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CIP School in the Phils.

Philippines!! HAVE A GUN you WILL “DIE” that is how you have a “Dictator”

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Martial Law confiscation of guns remembered

On this eve of the 38th Anniversary of the declaration of Martial Law in the Philippines, we recall with outrage how one of the first acts the dictator Ferdinand Marcos’s was to proclaim that all persons shall not posses or carry any firearm outside of residence. The alleged basis was lawless terrorism, open rebellion, and assassinations of government officials – all of which were later proven to be false, fabricated, and concocted – which sounds chillingly similar to recent orders today by the PNP tightening rules on firearms. Nevertheless, the infamous General Order N. 6 was used by the Military and Philippine Constabulary as a basis to order the surrender and confiscation of all privately owned firearms in the Philippines.

 

GENERAL ORDER No. 6

WHEREAS, Proclamation No.1081, dated September 21, 1972, declaring a state of martial law throughout the land was issued because of wanton destruction of lives and property, wide- spread lawlessness and anarchy, and chaos and disorder now prevailing throughout the country, which condition has been the in- tended consequences of the activities of groups of men now actively engaged in criminal conspiracy to seize political and state power in the Philippines and to take over the Government by force and violence the extent of which has now assumed the proportion of an actual war against our people and their legitimate Government;

WHEREAS, terroristic activities, assassination of innocent citizens and leaders of our society are going on unabated due to the mounting efforts of those radical and lawless elements who are now actively challenging and defying the Government through actual military confrontation; and

WHEREAS, in order to restore the tranquility and stability of the nation and secure the people from violence, injuries and loss of lives in the quickest possible manner and time, it is necessary to prohibit the inhabitants of the country from keeping any firearm without a permit duly and legally issued for that purpose as well as to prohibit the carrying of such firearm outside the residence of the duly licensed holder thereof;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Ferdinand E. Marcos, Commander-in-Chief of all the Armed Forces of the Philippines, and pursuant to Proclamation No.1081 dated September 21, 1972, do hereby order that henceforth and until otherwise ordered by me or by my duly designated representative, no person shall keep, possess or carry outside of his residence any firearm unless such person is duly authorized to keep, possess or carry any such firearm and any person violating this order shall forthwith be arrested and taken into custody and held for the duration of the emergency unless ordered released by me or by my duly designated representative.

Done in the City of Manila, this 22nd day of September in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and seventy-two

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In reaction to such threats, the government authorized the registration of all firearms and the confiscation thereof, if required for “public safety.”

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The Weimar Republic’s well-intentioned gun registry became a tool for evil. The perennial gun-control debate in America did not begin here. The same arguments for and against were made in the 1920s in the chaos of Germany’s Weimar Republic, which opted for gun registration. Law-abiding persons complied with the law, but the Communists and Nazis committing acts of political violence did not. In 1931, Weimar authorities discovered plans for a Nazi takeover in which Jews would be denied food and persons refusing to surrender their guns within 24 hours would be executed. They were written by Werner Best, a future Gestapo official. In reaction to such threats, the government authorized the registration of all firearms and the confiscation thereof, if required for “public safety.” The interior minister warned that the records must not fall into the hands of any extremist group. In 1933, the ultimate extremist group, led by Adolf Hitler, seized power and used the records to identify, disarm, and attack political opponents and Jews. Constitutional rights were suspended, and mass searches for and seizures of guns and dissident publications ensued. Police revoked gun licenses of Social Democrats and others who were not “politically reliable.” During the five years of repression that followed, society was “cleansed” by the National Socialist regime. Undesirables were placed in camps where labor made them “free,” and normal rights of citizenship were taken from Jews. The Gestapo banned independent gun clubs and arrested their leaders. Gestapo counsel Werner Best issued a directive to the police forbidding issuance of firearm permits to Jews. In 1938, Hitler signed a new Gun Control Act. Now that many “enemies of the state” had been removed from society, some restrictions could be slightly liberalized, especially for Nazi Party members. But Jews were prohibited from working in the firearms industry, and .22 caliber hollow-point ammunition was banned. The time had come to launch a decisive blow to the Jewish community, to render it defenseless so that its “ill-gotten” property could be redistributed as an entitlement to the German “Volk.” The German Jews were ordered to surrender all their weapons, and the police had the records on all who had registered them. Even those who gave up their weapons voluntarily were turned over to the Gestapo. This took place in the weeks before what became known as the Night of the Broken Glass, or Kristallnacht, occurred in November 1938. That the Jews were disarmed before it, minimizing any risk of resistance, is the strongest evidence that the pogrom was planned in advance. An incident was needed to justify unleashing the attack. That incident would be the shooting of a German diplomat in Paris by a teenage Polish Jew. Hitler directed propaganda minister Josef Goebbels to orchestrate the Night of the Broken Glass. This massive operation, allegedly conducted as a search for weapons, entailed the ransacking of homes and businesses, and the arson of synagogues. SS chief Heinrich Himmler decreed that 20 years be served in a concentration camp by any Jew possessing a firearm. Rusty revolvers and bayonets from the Great War were confiscated from Jewish veterans who had served with distinction. Twenty thousand Jewish men were thrown into concentration camps, and had to pay ransoms to get released. The U.S. media covered the above events. And when France fell to Nazi invasion in 1940, the New York Times reported that the French were deprived of rights such as free speech and firearm possession just as the Germans had been. Frenchmen who failed to surrender their firearms within 24 hours were subject to the death penalty. No wonder that in 1941, just days before the Pearl Harbor attack, Congress reaffirmed Second Amendment rights and prohibited gun registration. In 1968, bills to register guns were debated, with opponents recalling the Nazi experience and supporters denying that the Nazis ever used registration records to confiscate guns. The bills were defeated, as every such proposal has been ever since, including recent “universal background check” bills. As in Weimar Germany, some well-meaning people today advocate severe restrictions, including bans and registration, on gun ownership by law-abiding persons. Such proponents are in no sense “Nazis,” any more than were the Weimar officials who promoted similar restrictions. And it would be a travesty to compare today’s situation to the horrors of Nazi Germany. Still, as history teaches, the road to hell is paved with good intentions.

Read more at: http://www.nationalreview.com/article/365103/how-nazis-used-gun-control-stephen-p-halbrook

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Infectious diseases (Small POX) killed 19 Million? people

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The 2010 census found 2,932,248 Americans who identified themselves as being Native American (or Alaskan Native), about 0.9% of the U.S. population.[1] No consensus exists on how many native people lived in the Americas before the arrival of Columbus, but extensive research has been, and continues to be conducted.[2][3] Estimates on the population of pre-Colombus North America range from a low of 2.1 million (Ubelaker 1976) to 7 million people (Russell Thornton) to 18 million (Dobyns 1983).[4]

As the direct result of infectious diseases, conflict with Europeans, wars between tribes, assimilation, migration to Canada and Mexico, declining birth rates, the numbers of Native Americans dropped to below half a million in the 19th century. Scholars believe that the overwhelming main causes were new infectious diseases carried by European explorers and traders. Native Americans had no acquired immunity to such diseases, which had been chronic in Eurasian populations for over five centuries.[5] For instance, some estimates indicate case fatality rates of 80–98% in Native American populations during smallpox epidemics.[6]

The United States Census Bureau (1894) provided their estimate of deaths due specifically to war during the 102 years between 1789 and 1891, including 8,500 Indians and 5,000 whites killed in “individual affairs”:

The Indian wars under the government of the United States have been more than 40 in number. They have cost the lives of about 19,000 white men, women and children, including those killed in individual combats, and the lives of about 30,000 Indians. The actual number of killed and wounded Indians must be very much higher than the number given… Fifty percent additional would be a safe estimate…[7]

In the same 1894 report, the Census Bureau dismissed assertions that millions of Native Americans once inhabited what is now the United States, insisting instead that North America in 1492 was an almost empty continent, and “guesstimating” that aboriginal populations “could not have exceeded much over 500,000

 

THE BRITISH WAS HELPING THE AMERICAN INDIANS TO KILL AMERICANS!!!

For the Americans the American Revolutionary War was essentially two parallel wars: while the war in the east was a struggle against British rule, the war in the west was an “Indian War”. The newly proclaimed United States competed with the British for control of the territory of Native American nations east of the Mississippi River. Some Native Americans who joined the struggle sided with the British, as they hoped to win the opportunity to reduce settlement and expansion onto their land. The Revolutionary War was “the most extensive and destructive” Indian war in United States history.[12]

Some native communities were divided over which side to support in the war. For the Iroquois Confederacy, based in New York and Pennsylvania, the American Revolution resulted in civil war; the Six Nations split, with the Oneida and Tuscarora siding with the rebels, and Mohawk, Seneca, Cayuga, and Onondaga fighting with and for the British. While the Iroquois tried to avoid fighting directly against one another, the Revolution eventually forced intra-Iroquois combat. Both sides lost territory following the United States establishing its independence. The Crown aided the landless Iroquois by rewarding them with a reservation at Grand River in Ontario and some other lands. In the Southeast, the Cherokee split into a neutral (or pro-patriot) faction and a pro-British faction, whom the Americans referred to as the Chickamauga Cherokee; they were led by Dragging Canoe. Many other tribes were similarly divided.

Both immigrant and native noncombatants suffered greatly during the war, and villages and food supplies were frequently destroyed during military expeditions. The largest of these expeditions was the Sullivan Expedition of 1779, which razed more than 40 Iroquois villages.

When the British made peace with the Americans in the Treaty of Paris (1783), they ceded a vast amount of Native American territory (without the consent of the indigenous peoples) to the United States. The United States treated the Native Americans who had fought with the British as enemy allies, a conquered people who had lost their land. The federal government of the United States was eager to expand, and the national government did so by purchasing Native American land in treaties and through warfare.

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Will we go through another “EIGHT” “YEARS” will The Clintons??

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Presidents are often defined by foreign policy doctrines.

The Reagan Doctrine famously overwhelmed the Soviet Union by supporting freedom movements and communist resisters in Europe and Central America.

The Monroe Doctrine telegraphed U.S. intentions to consider further colonization of North or South America by European nations as an act of war requiring U.S. military response.

In the 2008 presidential campaign, liberal television reporter, Charles Gibson, infamously tried to trap Sarah Palin into explaining the Bush Doctrine, a multi-faceted policy. At its core, it stated that in order to keep our borders safe from future attacks on our homeland, we will root out bad guys being harbored in hostile countries.

It is fair to ask, what is The Clinton Doctrine? It is self-evident:

The Clinton Doctrine leverages the influence of Bill and Hillary Clinton to increase their wealth, even if the consequence of influenced-policy is harmful to our nation.

Put another way:

The Clinton Doctrine puts Clinton interests ahead of national interests. In other words, they’ll sell out the United States for big bucks.

It is a doctrine of greed.

It is a doctrine of disloyalty.

It is cynically immoral.

Liberal pundits suggest that their entire greedy gambit is too complex for stupid voters to understand. Even more, they state that the Clintons have been through scandals before, and they always seem to come out unscathed.

In fact, sometimes they come out better than ever.

With another Clinton presidency in the offing, it is worth revisiting Peter Schweitzer’s book, “Clinton Cash,” that puts the pattern of Clinton wealth enrichment on full display.

I don’t think the pattern is difficult to understand. The most famous example was reported by the liberal New York Times:

THE URANIUM SCAM

–> A Canadian uranium mine owner gives the Clinton Foundation $2 million.

–> The Clinton Foundation fails to report the largesse to the White House in violation of Ms. Clinton’s promise otherwise.

–> The Uranium company buys up mines all over the world and wants to cash out by selling them to a Russian based company controlled by Vladimir Putin, our enemy.

–> The sale requires Clinton’s approval.

–> She says yes.

–> Uranium is critical to our nuclear defense capabilities. Now Vladimir Putin controls a fifth of our uranium needs.

Whereas a Donald Trump proudly proclaims his willingness to buy influence, “Clinton Cash” presents one example after another tainted with the whiff of influence peddling.

Whereas previous presidents espoused doctrines that they believed represented the best interest of the country, the Clinton Doctrine is all about Bill and Hillary.

Always.

Voters get it. The question is, who is least repugnant: influence peddlers or influence buyers?

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A “White Boy” helping the “HOMELESS” WOW “NEVER”

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Let me tell you a :Story about a little “BOY” with a “BIG” Heart!!

Little Red Wagon is a 2012 docudrama directed by David Anspaugh and written by Patrick Sheane Duncan. The film stars Anna Gunn, Daveigh Chase, Frances O’Connor, and Chandler Canterbury.

Little Red Wagon covers Zach Bonner‘s philanthropic work as founder of the Little Red Wagon Foundation. It begins with his volunteer work gathering food and supplies for survivors in the aftermath of Hurricane Charley‘s carnage. The film then details his walks across the United States between 2007 and 2010 totaling 4,263 miles (6,861 km) to draw attention to the plight of homeless children. Filmed in and around Charleston, South Carolina in May 2010, Little Red Wagon cost a reported US$5 million to produce.

The film received mixed reviews. Reviewers praised it for being inspiring and making tangible how aiding the homeless significantly affects their lives for the better. Other reviewers found the film’s plot too simplified, finding that aside from the sibling rivalry between Bonner and his sister, the film lacked conflict, an imperative component of a drama. They also found some parts of the film unrealistic such as the portrayal of homelessness and the managing of a non-profit organization.

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SOCIAL SERVICES THINK’S THEY CAN RAISE CHILDREN BETTER “SO” THEY MAKE LAW’S TO TAKE YOUR CHILDREN AWAY FROM “YOU” IT IS ALL ABOUT MONEY FOR THEM

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  • Legislation related to the new requirements of the Preventing Sex Trafficking and Strengthening Families Act of 2014 to include human trafficking, missing children and development of a reasonable and prudent parenting standard.
  • Adoption re-homing laws (re-homing describes the practice of adoptive parents seeking to relinquish care of their adopted children outside the control and purview of the courts or public child welfare agencies).
  • Child sexual abuse prevention school curricula.
  • Reporting of child abuse and neglect.
  • Services for older youth in foster care.

This document was prepared using StateNet, a legislative tracking database, to perform bill searches and analysis. Summaries provided in this document and in the 50-state, online searchable database (please see the link below) are provided by StateNet. This document is intended to provide an overview of significant enacted legislation in each state. It does not represent a comprehensive list of enacted bills and does not include all child welfare legislative enactments.

This document does not contain bills with technical changes, state budget appropriations bills, adopted resolutions, or Executive Orders. Please note that the total number of enacted bills do not add up due to bills that address multiple topics.

Please contact Nina Williams-Mbengue at nina.mbengue@ncsl.org or (303) 856-1559 if you have questions or corrections.  To access 2005-2011 legislation, view the NCSL Child Welfare Legislative Enactments webpage. Also check out NCSL’s2013 Child Welfare Legislative Action Overview.

Administration/Oversight/Interagency Collaboration

Approximately 20 states enacted 34 bills related to the administration, oversight and interagency collaboration of state child welfare agencies. Topics addressed included legal representation for children and indigent parents; development of commissions, task forces and working groups; and, collaboration between child welfare, law enforcement, the courts and other critical stakeholders.

Administration

  • Oklahoma required a one-year trial period for any Department of Human Services employee who transfers to become a Child Welfare Specialist.
  • Oklahoma lawmakers also authorized the DHS Citizen Advisory Panels to meet, no more than six times per year, at their discretion to solicit input from department employees, persons receiving services from the department and community stakeholders and requires that the meetings comply with the provisions of the Open Meetings Act.

Commissions, Task Forces, Working Groups and System Recommendations

  • California required the department, in consultation with counties and labor organizations, to establish a process to receive disclosures from social workers, if a social worker has cause to believe that a policy, procedure, or practice endangers the health or well-being of a child.
  • Colorado created a new advisory work group related to the Office of the Child Protection Ombudsman with the purpose of making recommendations for autonomy and accountability.
  • Delaware added the superintendent of the State Police, the Chair of the Child Death, Near Death and Stillbirth Commission, an investigation coordinator responsible for tracking reported cases of alleged child abuse or neglect, a foster care youth and a representative of the Public Defender’s Office to the Child Protection Accountability Commission.
  • Delaware established the Child Placement Review Board to provide a citizen-based independent monitoring of Delaware children in the care and custody of a placement agency to ensure that children achieve permanency.
  • Illinois charged the Children’s Justice Task Force with the exploration, research and development of recommendations on a multidisciplinary team approach for the investigation of reports of abuse or neglect of children.
  • Maine required the Department of Health and Human Services to convene a working group to review current laws and the scope of department authority with respect to the abuse and neglect of children; to identify gaps in the system; and, to make recommendations to strengthen the protection of children from abuse and neglect.
  • Michigan required the ombudsman to notify the Department of Human Services of any immediate safety concerns regarding a child or children who are part of an active or open protective services or foster care case; allowed the ombudsman to request substance use disorder records if a valid consent or court order is obtained; specified the ombudsman’s authority to request records from the court, attorney general, prosecuting attorney, DHS attorney, or county child fatality review team and detailed when the ombudsman is required to investigate child fatality cases.
  • Missouri recommended ways to improve abuse and neglect proceedings.
  • Oklahoma directed that the Office of Juvenile System Oversight receive foster parent complaints and then work with the Office of Client Advocacy within DHS to ensure that the complaint is investigated and resolved within 60 days; requires annual report for Legislature on the complaints.
  • Rhode Island created an advisory committee to the Office of the Child Advocate to provide advice and support to the Child advocate and to review and assess patterns of treatment and services, policy implications and necessary systemic improvements.
  • Vermont required the Chief Performance Officer to annually report to the General Assembly on the state’s progress in reaching the population-level outcomes for each area of the state’s quality of life by providing data for the population-level indicators relating to economy, health, environment, children’s services, services for the elderly and people with disabilities.

Collaboration and Data Sharing

  • Delaware created a Child Welfare Data Sharing Task Force to make recommendations for data sharing between Family Court, the Department of Education and the Department of Services for Children, Youth, and Their Families.
  • Oklahoma permitted the Department of Human Services to contract with active or retired social work, medical or law enforcement personnel to assist child welfare workers responding to a report of child abuse or neglect.

Adoption

family of three on a walkApproximately 19 states enacted 26 bills regarding adoption. Topics included re-homing adopted children, information sharing, original birth certificates and confidentiality, post-adoption services, and adoption and post-adoption supports, subsidies and tax credits. (Re-homing describes the practice of adoptive parents seeking to relinquish care of their adopted children outside the control and purview of the courts or public child welfare agencies.)

Adoption Re-Homing

  • Colorado prohibited advertising through a newspaper, periodical, telephone book, outdoor advertising sign, radio, television, computerized communication system or other public medium for the purposes of finding a child to adopt, finding an adoptive home for a child, or offering to place a child for adoption.
  • Florida established a new criminal offense for so called “re-homing” when an adopted child is given up illegally to another family.
  • Louisiana created the crime of re-homing an abused child without court approval and required the multidisciplinary team approach applicable to children who have been abused and neglected to apply to children who are re-homed.
  • Ohio prohibited, unless otherwise permitted by law, a person from offering money or anything of value in exchange for the placement of a child for adoption and prohibited a biological parent from requesting money or anything of value in exchange for placement of the parent’s child with a qualified adoptive parent, however lawmakers permitted a biological parent of a child to advertise about the availability for placement of the parent’s child for adoption to a qualified adoptive parent and permitted a government entity to advertise its role in the placement of children for adoption or other information that would be relevant to qualified adoptive parents.
  • Wisconsin detailed and clarified the requirements and definition of advertising related to adoption or other permanent physical placements of a child and clarified delegation of parental power regarding the care and custody of a child for more than one year.

Information Sharing, Original Birth Certificates and Contact Preferences

  • Colorado required access to all adoption records for an adult adoptee or an adoptive parent, guardian, or legal representative of a minor adoptee, allowed the registrar to conduct a search of death certificates to determine whether an adoptee or a birth parent is deceased and required the custodian of birth records to provide a child’s birth parent the original birth certificate and other documents.
  • Connecticut required the Department of Public Health to give adopted individuals at least age 18, or their adult children or grandchildren, uncertified copies of the adoptee’s original birth certificate on request.
  • Illinois added adult grandchildren, age 21 or over, to the list of people who may obtain information about an adult adopted person.
  • New Jersey allowed adult adopted persons and certain other individuals to obtain an adopted person’s original birth certificate and other related documents, with certain restrictions.
  • Ohio specified requirements for contact preference and biological parent’s name redaction request forms, repealed provisions allowing post-1963 adoptees to file a petition to obtain information about the adoptee’s biological family and allowed an adopted person, who is at least 18, to submit a written request to obtain a copy of the person’s adoption file.
  • Virginia allowed the commissioner of Social Services to release identifying information requested by an adult adopted person who is seeking disclosure of identifying information about his or her birth parents and consent of the birth parents is not obtainable due to the death or mental incapacity of the birth parents.
  • West Virginia detailed what information is available to be disclosed to specified individuals, including the identity of abuse and neglect reporters, adoption records, juvenile records and others.

Post-Adoption Services

  • Alabama made children 14 years of age or older who were adopted from foster care eligible for $15,000 in post-secondary education assistance and extended eligibility until the adopted child turns 26.
  • Connecticut extended medical subsidies for certain adopted children over 18 but younger than 21.

Adoption and Post-Adoption Supports, Subsidies and Tax Credits

  • Indiana allowed individuals eligible to claim the federal adoption tax credit to also claim an adjusted gross income tax credit and required the established committee on adoption to study how other states provide services under public adoption programs, the legal and regulatory costs associated with foster care and private adoption, and to make recommendations.
  • Iowa allowed for an individual income tax credit for adoptions that are completed by the department of human services, a child placing agency, an agency complying with the interstate compact on placement of children or an independent placement.
  • Ohio and Michigan increased the adoption tax credit.

View more NCSL adoption and post-adoption support, subsidies and tax credits state legislation.

Other

  • Idaho clarified when an unmarried biological father has manifested a full commitment to his parental responsibilities and when an unmarried biological father is deemed to have waived and surrendered any right in relation to a child.
  • Illinois defined “related,” for purposes of adoption and guardianship, to include relationships by civil union, step-grandparents and second cousins.
  • Indiana prohibited granting an adoption while custody appeals are pending and clarified that the court handling the adoption has exclusive jurisdiction over the child if there is a petition for adoption and a paternity action pending at the same time.
  • Iowa required a pre-placement investigation and report to include examination of the criminal and child abuse records of the prospective adoption petitioner.
  • Louisiana required that a petitioner for an intra-family adoption be related to the child’s mother or father, whether or not their parental rights are intact.
  • Ohio defined living expenses that may be paid to a birth mother on behalf of a petitioner by an attorney or agency arranging a minor’s adoption to include rental or mortgage payments, utility payments, payments for products or services required for the birth mother’s or minor’s sustenance or safety including food, household goods, personal care items, and the cost of transportation to work or school.
  • Maryland expanded search, contact, and reunion services for a minor who was adopted through a local department of social services and a local department determines that reunification with the minor’s adoptive parents is not in the minor’s best interests.
  • Michigan set forth requirements for consent or release for adoption and required that certain pre‑birth adoption notifications be sent to each putative father, reduced the time which a putative father must register with the putative father registry, reduced the time period to appeal an adoption decree, permitted entities to advertise regarding the adoption of children and defined living expenses of a birth mother for purposes of adoption.
  • Utah required a birth mother to reside in the state for a specified time before she consents to the adoption or relinquishment of her child.
  • Wisconsin enacted legislation requesting the bill requests the Joint Legislative Council to study adoption disruption and dissolution including the extent of, and efforts to prevent, adoption disruption and dissolution, recommended legislation to define, prevent, track and report on the issue and legislation options to prepare prospective adoptive parents for adoption and to support them after adoption.

Child Fatality/Near Fatality

Approximately nine states enacted 12 bills related to child fatality or near fatality.

  • Georgia required each county’s child fatality review committee to determine the manner and cause of death and if the death was preventable; required the Georgia Child Fatality Review Panel to oversee the local child fatality review process and report to the Governor on the incidence of child deaths with recommendations for prevention.
  • Oklahoma created the Child Death Reporting Act of 2014 which detailed child death or near death reports, permitted notification to legislative designees of a child protective services review, detailed procedures for release of information and evidence of wrongdoing by the department and recreated the Child Death Review Board.
  • Oklahoma lawmakers also specified that the Oklahoma Commission on Children and Youth include in its report of a child death or near death confirmation of whether previous reports of suspected child abuse or neglect have been made concerning the alleged victim of death or near death or against the person responsible for the child and provides that any statements or gestures by DHS expressing apology or sympathy relating to the injury or death of a child are inadmissible as evidence of liability.
  • Pennsylvania provided for the postmortem investigation of deaths.
  • Tennessee required the department, during investigations of child fatality for abuse or neglect, to release the child’s age, the child’s gender and whether the department has had a history with the child, within five business days following the fatality.

View more NCSL child fatality and near fatality state legislation.

Child Protection

child smelling flowerNearly 34 states enacted almost 100 bills addressing child protection in the areas of child abuse investigations, child sexual abuse, confidentiality and information sharing, definitions and health care.

Child Abuse Investigations

  • Alaska expanded the ability to recruit a multidisciplinary team, including clarifying who may be part of a team, to assist law enforcement in criminal investigations that involve an alleged crime against a child.
  • California required a community youth athletic program to provide written notice to the parent or guardian of a youth participating in the program regarding the program’s policies relating to criminal background checks for volunteer and hired coaches in the program.
  • Delaware clarified the duties of the Investigation Coordinator in the child protection system to have the authority to track each reported case of abuse or neglect, and to be responsible for tracking and monitoring each reported case of death, serious physical injury, and sexual abuse of a child and created confidentiality and immunity clauses to protect the information and records obtained by the Investigation Coordinator.
  • Georgia required each county to establish a protocol for investigating and dealing with cases of abuse and neglect.
  • Idaho required all investigative or risk assessment interviews of alleged victims of child abuse conducted by personnel of child advocacy centers to be documented by audio or video taping.
  • Illinois lawmakers provided that the differential response program is to become a permanent program, upon completion of the demonstration project period.
  • Minnesota required counties to maintain sufficient information on reports alleging child maltreatment that were not accepted for assessment or investigation so that repeat reports involving the same child can be identified.
  • Minnesota allowed child welfare agencies access to child support data on the child, the parents, and relatives of a child.
  • New York required the Office of Children and Family Services to examine the telephone call history of previous reports of child abuse or maltreatment alleged in other counties and districts of the state.
  • Oklahoma directed the Department of Human Services to consider risks of children unable to communicate effectively about abuse or neglect in investigations and assessments.
  • Pennsylvania lawmakers clarified that an investigative team convened through protocol developed by the county agency and the district attorney is referred to as a multidisciplinary investigative team and allowed a county agency to require a medical examination when deemed necessary due to information discovered during the course of the investigation and without an indication of serious physical injury.
  • Pennsylvania provided that child protective services must provide for exchange of information regarding the medical health and treatment of a child by certified medical practitioners.
  • Virginia prohibited a person from being employed in a position that involves direct contact with a patient of, or person or child receiving services from, a nursing home, home health organization, hospice, assisted living facility, adult day care, child welfare agency, or family day home approved by a family day system until the results of a criminal history background check have been received.
  • Washington required that the State School Directors’ Association adopt a model policy to implement statutory provisions regarding the interview of children in child abuse and neglect investigations on school premises.

Child Sexual Abuse

  • Colorado addressed protection of the victim of a sexual assault in cases where a child was conceived as a result of the sexual assault and required notification of the Indian tribe if the child is an Indian child.  The legislation also provided waivers for legal counsel and filing fees and provided procedures for voluntarily relinquishing the child by the victim.
  • New Mexico required all licensed school employees to complete training to detect and report sexual abuse and assault within the first year of employment, or during the 2014-2015 school year for current employees.
  • South Dakota established the Jolene’s Law Task Force to study the impact of sexual abuse of children and to make policy recommendations to the Legislature.
  • Virginia required every attorney for the Commonwealth to establish a multidisciplinary child sexual abuse response team to conduct regular reviews of cases involving child sexual abuse in the jurisdiction.

Definitions

  • California provided that a minor who was not a victim of, but who was physically present at the time of, an act of domestic violence is a witness and is deemed to have suffered harm. It also expanded the definition of domestic violence to include abuse perpetrated against a child of a party to the domestic violence proceedings.
  • California defined sexual exploitation to include a person who knowingly downloads, streams, or accesses through any electronic or digital media, a film, photograph, videotape, video recording, negative, or slide in which a child is engaged in an act of obscene sexual conduct.
  • Louisiana redefined safety plan to mean a plan for the purpose of assuring a child’s health and safety by imposing conditions for the child to safely remain in the home, or for the continued placement of the child with a custodian.
  • Oklahoma allowed a parent or guardian to use reasonable and ordinary force as a means of discipline.
  • Pennsylvania created the offense of luring a child into a motor vehicle or structure, redefined “perpetrator” and “person responsible for the child’s welfare,” broadened the definition of “child abuse” by lowering thresholds necessary to substantiate various types of child abuse and created the offense of false reporting of child abuse and the offense of intimidation or retaliation in child abuse cases.
  • >Tennessee created the offense of continuous sexual abuse of a child.
  • Utah modified the offense of aggravated sexual abuse of a child by defining the term “position of special trust” and clarifying that the definition of a teacher includes adult employees and volunteers at public and private schools; expanded the definition of position of special trust to include an adoptive parent, an athletic manager who is an adult, an aunt, a babysitter, a coach, a cohabitant of a parent if the cohabitant is an adult, a counselor, a doctor or physician, an employer, a foster parent, a grandparent, a legal guardian, a natural parent, a recreational leader who is an adult, a religious leader, a sibling or a step sibling who is an adult; and, expanded the definition of abuse to include a child’s natural parent intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly causing the death of another parent of the child or being the primary suspect in an investigation for causing the death of another parent of the child.

Confidentiality and Information Sharing

  • Connecticut expanded the circumstances in which the departments of Children and Families (DCF) and Social Services (DSS) must disclose the names and records of certain individuals to specific entities and the circumstances in which DSS must disclose information to DCF about a child receiving DSS services or the child’s immediate family.
  • Maryland required the Department of Human Resources or a local department of social services to provide specified information, on request, to a health care practitioner or another entity which is providing treatment or care to a child who is the subject of a report of child abuse or neglect.

Health Care and Medical Services

  • New Hampshire established a commission to study public-private partnerships to fund medical care for abused and neglected children.
  • New York allowed the local commissioner of social services or local commissioner of health to give consent for medical, dental, health and hospital services for any child found by the family court to be an abused, neglected or destitute child.
  • South Carolina enacted the State Children’s Advocacy Medical Response System Act to provide coordination and medical service resources statewide to agencies and entities that respond to victims of child abuse and neglect.

Courts and Legal Representation

Approximately 18 states enacted 20 bills to address court procedure and legal representation in child welfare cases. Topics included child and parent representation and court procedures.

Child and Parent Representation

  • Colorado established the Office of the Respondent Parents’ Counsel in the state judicial department to provide legal representation to parents involved in dependency and neglect proceedings who lack the financial means to obtain legal representation.
  • Florida required the court to appoint an attorney for a dependent child who: resides in, or is being considered for placement in a skilled nursing facility, is prescribed a psychotropic medication and declines it, has a developmental disability, is being placed in, or is considered for placement in, a residential treatment center, or is a victim of human trafficking. The bill also clarified who will contract with the appointed attorney, the compensation for the appointed attorney and required the Department of Children and Families to identify and request attorney representation for qualifying children.
  • Louisiana detailed legal representation for children and indigent parents in child protection cases and established the Child Representation System and the Child Protection Representation Commission.
  • Oklahoma allowed any party to file an application for an emergency hearing that demonstrates harm to the health, safety or welfare of a child who is the subject of a deprived child proceeding.
  • Oregon authorized the court to appoint a protected person special advocate in a protective proceeding at any time after the appointment of a fiduciary.
  • Utah allowed the district court to appoint an office attorney guardian ad litem upon a determination that no private attorney guardians ad litem are reasonably available. The state also required any savings to the Office to reduce caseloads, improve juvenile court and to recruit and train private attorneys.
  • Virginia allowed Court Appointed Special Advocate volunteer appointments to continue for youth ages 18 and older who are in foster care when the juvenile court has retained jurisdiction and the juvenile and domestic relations district court judge determines such services are appropriate.
  • Washington required the court to appoint an attorney for a child in a dependency proceeding within 72 hours of granting a petition to terminate the parent and child relationship and established a pilot program to study the effect of appointing an attorney for the child at the time of the shelter care.

Court Procedure

  • Delaware clarified the standard under which the Family Court must determine competing guardianship and permitted that when a child has been in a guardianship for at least two years after the termination of parental rights, the Department may petition the court for permission to provide reports on a 12-month basis, instead of every six months.
  • Georgia detailed the allowance of a child to testify outside the presence of the accused in criminal proceedings, including the requirement that the child be under age 18.
  • Maryland altered the jurisdiction of an equity court to include custody or guardianship of an immigrant child pursuant to a Motion for Special Immigrant Juvenile Factual Findings requesting a determination that the child was abused, neglected, or abandoned before the age of 18 for purposes of the Federal Immigration and Nationality Act.
  • Michigan created a juvenile mental health court.
  • Oklahoma prohibited a court, in private custody proceedings, from awarding custody or guardianship of a child to a person who has been convicted of certain crimes regarding the abuse, endangerment, exploitation of children or of first-degree rape.
  • Oklahoma also gave group homes the same rights as foster parents throughout the various stages of a deprived-child proceeding.
  • Pennsylvania required the court to consider whether the child has been identified as an abused child and whether a party has been identified as a perpetrator of child abuse in custody cases and specifies the information the court should consider and be provided in order to make a custody determination.

Disproportionality

  • Illinois required the African-American Family Commission to advise the Governor and General Assembly, as well as work directly with State agencies, to improve and expand existing policies, services, programs, and opportunities for African-American families and to promote research efforts to document the impact of certain policies and programs on African-American families.
  • Minnesota created the Cultural and Ethnic Communities Leadership Council.

For more, view NCSL Disproportionality and Disparity in Child Welfare.

Education of Children and Youth in Foster Care

students at graduationApproximately 10 states enacted 10 bills providing for the education of current and former foster children. Topics included the educational goals and stability of children in foster care and tuition assistance. For more, view NCSL’s Educating Children in Foster Care: State Legislation 2008 – 2012.

Educational Goals and Educational Stability

Seven states—Connecticut, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, South Dakota, Washington and West Virginia—enacted legislation dealing with the educational goals and stability of foster children.

  • Connecticut required the superintendent of each school district providing education to foster youth, to provide the department, a foster parent, and the attorney for the child a description of the child’s educational status and academic progress that is substantially similar to the description provided to parents of non-foster youth.
  • Iowa encouraged the area education agency board to employ a child welfare liaison to provide services and guidance to local school districts to facilitate the efficient and effective transfer and enrollment of a child in foster care to another school district.
  • Maine set forth the process for the Department of Education to follow in awarding a Department diploma to a student who has experienced an education disruption.
  • Maryland defined educational stability as the continuous process of identifying and implementing the appropriate educational placement, training, resources, services and experiences that will address successful educational outcomes of a child and contribute to the child’s overall well-being. The legislation required a court to inquire as to the educational stability of a child at a shelter care hearing, adjudicatory hearing, disposition hearing, and at any change of placement proceeding.
  • South Dakota required the education of children placed in residential treatment centers to be the responsibility of the school district where the center is located.
  • Washington directed the Family Assessment Response worker to assess for child well-being and child safety when collaborating with a family to determine the need for child care, preschool, or home visiting services, and to refer children involved in the child welfare system to certain preschool programs, and to provide referrals to high quality child care and early learning programs and appropriate state and federally subsidized programs.
  • West Virginia allowed special needs students with an individualized education plan to participate in graduation ceremonies; and, prohibited county boards from denying continuing special education services to the student due to participation in a graduation ceremony.

Foster Care

kids laying in circleAbout 15 states enacted 30 bills dealing with foster care. The topics included: credit reporting, foster parent rights, health and mental health, parent rights and residential group homes/congregate care.  (See also NCSL Preventing Sex Trafficking and Strengthening Families Act legislation.)

Credit Reports

  • California lawmakers required a county welfare department, county probation department, or the State Department of Social Services to inquire of each of the three major credit reporting agencies as to whether a child in foster care has any consumer credit history.
  • Oklahoma lawmakers required DHS to provide an annual credit report to youth in its custody.

Foster Parent Bill of Rights

  • Michigan authorized the children’s ombudsman to commence and conduct investigations into alleged violations of the Foster Parent’s Bill of Rights law.
  • Oklahoma required foster parents be given a copy of the liability insurance policy the Department of Human Services maintains for every Department-contracted foster home placement.
  • Oklahoma lawmakers also required the Office of Juvenile System Oversight to receive any complaint alleging that an employee of the Department of Human Services or a child-placing agency has threatened a foster parent with removal of a child from the foster parent, harassed a foster parent, or refused or disrupted a child placement as retaliation or discrimination; required foster parents be informed of their rights annually.

For more, view NCSL Foster Care Bill of Rights.

Health and Mental Health

  • California required the State Department of Social Services to convene a stakeholder group to identify barriers to the provision of mental health services for children receiving medically necessary specialty mental health services.
  • Virginia eliminated the requirement that an individual under the age of 19 must have been without health insurance for at least four months or must meet the requirements set forth in the Children’s Health Insurance Program to be eligible for assistance under the Family Access to Medical Insurance Security Plan.
  • Washington allowed foster children access to health care through the health benefit exchange in the state.

For more legislation, view NCSL Health Oversight for Children and Youth in Foster Care.

Parent Bill of Rights

  • Oklahoma created the Parents’ Bill of Rights; prohibited the state from infringing upon parental rights, directed the board of education of a school district to develop a policy listing parental rights related to education, including sex education; prohibited a surgical procedure on a minor without parental consent—excluding abortion— and, prohibited a mental health evaluation of a minor without parental consent.

For more, view NCSL Foster Care Bill of Rights.

Residential Group Homes, Congregate Care

  • Oklahoma recognized the interests of group homes in child placement proceedings and authorized the Department to contract with designated youth services agencies or designated child-placing agencies for the management and operation of the shelter and for management and operation of youth group homes. The legislation also required continuing education for its employees in the area of cultural competency regarding race and gender-based disparities faced by youth in group homes.
  • Wisconsin allowed a child to be placed in a shelter care facility for no more than 20 days under a voluntary agreement and further allowed a child’s parent, guardian, or Indian custodian, DCF, the Department of Corrections, a county department of human or social services, or a child welfare agency licensed to place children in shelter care facilities to place the child in a shelter care facility.

For more, view NCSL Congregate Care, Residential Treatment and Group Home State Legislation.

Other

  • Hawaii appropriated funds for programs and services for children of incarcerated parents and to assist with family reunification.
  • Louisiana prohibited a child from being placed in a foster home for temporary care, except for emergency placement, or for adoption until it is determined that the prospective foster or adoptive parent has not been convicted of nor pled nolo contendere to a felony drug possession offense unless five or more years have elapsed between the date of placement or until the individual has submitted to and passed an initial drug test and has provided written consent to any plan of random drug testing required by the Department of Children and Family Services; required drug tests shall be at the expense of the individual. The legislation authorized the department of child and family services to consider prior convictions in determining whether to place a child in a foster home for temporary care or for adoption.
  • Minnesota lawmakers required the home study of prospective foster parents to address the capacity of the prospective parents to provide a smoke-free home environment for the child and that child-placing agencies must ensure foster homes maintain a smoke-free environment.  The legislation provided that this subdivision does not apply to traditional or spiritual Native American or religious ceremonies involving tobacco use.
  • Oklahoma gave parents in crisis the legal authority to place their children with a host family without DHS involvement and modified existing child placement licensure laws so as not to hinder the work of private groups and host families who assist families in crisis.
  • Wisconsin prohibited any person from sending a child out of this state, bringing a child into this state, or causing a child to be sent out of this state or brought into this state for the purpose of permanently transferring physical custody of the child to a person who is not a relative of the child. That prohibition, however, does not apply to a placement of a child that is authorized under the Interstate Compact on the Placement of Children or any other statutory provisions governing the interstate placement of children or a placement of a child that is approved by a court of competent jurisdiction of the sending state or receiving state.

Fostering Connections To Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008

  • Washington expanded eligibility criteria to allow a youth to request extended foster care services if the youth engages in employment for 80 hours or more per month or if the youth is not able to engage in any established qualifying activities due to a documented medical condition.

For more state actions related to provisions of the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008, view NCSL Fostering Connections State Actions.

Funding

At least 16 states enacted 26 bills regarding the funding of child welfare services. While the majority dealt with basic funding and appropriations, a few bills addressed specific financing strategies.

  • Arkansas enacted two bills that provide funding to the State Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Board and the State Veterans’ Child Welfare Service Office respectively.
  • Colorado detailed supplemental appropriations to the Department of Human Services and aligned certain state medical assistance programs’ eligibility laws with the federal patient protection and affordable care act.
  • Connecticut extended the period for which the Department of Children and Families may provide periodic adoption subsidies to special needs children between the ages of 18 and 21 under specified circumstances.
  • Delaware created a Stop Child Abuse license plate, allowing for the proceeds to go to the Protecting Delaware’s Children Fund, created a check box for donations to the Protecting Delaware’s Children Fund on the individual income tax return and provided that all amounts shall be forwarded to the Delaware Community Foundation for use in public awareness campaigns promoting the reporting of child abuse.
  • Maryland allowed $150,000 of the general fund appropriation to be expended to fund a research project at the University of Maryland, Baltimore School of Social Work to study issues regarding unsuccessful reunifications of children with their parents after entering the foster care system.
  • Michigan eliminated county administrative rates for foster care services.
  • Pennsylvania increased funding for domestic violence and rape victim services and created a grant program to fund children’s advocacy centers. The bill also increased the costs paid by criminals to provide additional funds to domestic violence and rape victim services and required criminal defendants to fund children’s advocacy centers.

Infant Abandonment/Safe Surrender

  • Pennsylvania permitted a police officer at a police station to accept newborns from parents who wish to relinquish the newborn; required police officers to take newborns into protective custody, deliver the newborn to the hospital and immediately notify the county agency and submit a written report to the county agency and the police department. Provided the police officer the same immunity that health care workers currently receive when accepting a newborn. Required the Department of Public Welfare to provide educational materials to police officers regarding newborn protection. Exempts parents from criminal liability for solely leaving the newborn with the police, so long as the newborn is not a victim of child abuse or criminal conduct.

Kinship Care

grandparents with grandaughterEight states enacted 11 bills in 2014 related to kinship care in the topic areas of expanded definition of relative; licensing; relative preference; and, school enrollment and medical consent.

For more legislation supporting relative caregivers, view NCSL’s Supporting Relative Caregivers of Children.

Expanded Definition of Relative

  • Illinois expanded the definition of relative to include fictive kin and defined fictive kin to mean any individual, whether related or unrelated by birth or marriage, who is shown to have close personal or emotional ties with the child or the child’s family prior to the child’s placement with the individual.

Licensing

  • Illinois required fictive kin with whom a child is placed to apply for licensure as a foster family home and restricted the removal of a child from the home of fictive kin on the basis that the kin fails to apply for licensure or fails to meet licensure standard. Indiana allowed a person to operate a foster family home without a license if the person is a relative of the child for whom the person is providing supervision.

Relative Preference

  • California permitted a social worker to place a child who has been removed from the custody of his/her parents in the home of a relative or non-relative extended family member (NREFM) after a detention hearing and pending the dispositional hearing; clarified legislative intent that a social worker may place a child in the home of an appropriate relative or NREFM pending the consideration of other relatives who request preferential consideration.
  • Virginia required the Department of Social Services to review current policies governing facilitation of placement of children in kinship care to avoid foster care placements and to develop recommendations for regulations governing kinship placements.
  • Virginia specified that a child placed in kinship foster care shall not be removed from the physical custody of the kinship foster parent, provided the child has been living with the kinship foster parent for six consecutive months and the placement continues to meet approval standards for foster care, unless the kinship foster parent consents to the removal, the removal is agreed upon at a family partnership meeting, is court ordered, or warranted under existing law.

School Enrollment and Medical Consent

  • Missouri allowed relative caregivers, acting under an affidavit, to consent to medical treatment and educational services for a minor child with whom such caregiver lives if consent of the legal parent or guardian cannot be obtained through reasonable efforts.

For more, view NCSL School Enrollment and Medical Consent Laws.

Other

  • The District of Columbia allowed the Grandparent Caregivers Program subsidy to be transferred to a relative caregiver under specified conditions, when a grandparent is no longer able to care for a child.
  • Kentucky required the Cabinet for Health and Family services to create a centralized statewide service program that provides information and referrals through a statewide toll-free telephone number to grandparents and other caregivers who are caring for minors who are not their biological children.
  • Maryland lowered, from 21 years to 18 years, the age that a person must be to serve as a kinship parent for a child in need of out-of-home placement; repealed a provision authorizing a local department to waive the age requirement for a potential kinship parent who is at least 18 years of age and who lives with a spouse who is at least 21 years of age.

Prevention/Treatment/Training

Prevention

  • Arizona, Pennsylvania and Virginia recognized April 2014 as Child Abuse Prevention Month.
  • California required crisis nurseries to be licensed to operate overnight programs and specified the maximum capacity of crisis nurseries.
  • Illinois required the Department of Children and Family Services to enter into an interagency agreement for the purpose of preventing children and youth who are not abused or neglected from entering the custody of the Department solely to receive services for a mental illness or emotional disturbance. The legislation also established the Custody Relinquishment Prevention Act which creates a pathway for families to receive services through the appropriate state child-serving agency, rather than through relinquishment of parental custody to the Department of Children and Family Services.

Training

  • New Mexico required health education courses for fourth through eighth grade and for high school graduation beginning with the class of 2014, to include age-appropriate sexual abuse and assault awareness and prevention training.
  • Tennessee required that the departments of education and children’s services work together to enhance or adapt curriculum materials that focus on child sexual abuse, including such abuse which may occur in the child’s home.

For more state actions around child sexual abuse prevention, view NCSL’s Child Sexual Abuse Prevention and Erin’s Laws.

Treatment

  • Minnesota allowed children in voluntary foster care for treatment to return to the care of a parent on a trial home visit under certain circumstances in order to provide planning and supports to meet the child’s needs following treatment so that the child can return to the parent’s home.
  • Wisconsin revised the provisions of existing law that relate to the admission of minors for the treatment of mental illness to include the need to file a petition for a minor who is voluntarily participating in inpatient treatment, protecting the minor’s rights if said minor withdraws the consent for treatment, and eliminated the provision regarding short-terms voluntary admission stays.
  • Wisconsin also enacted legislation relating to evaluation of infants for fetal alcohol spectrum disorder and referral of infants who have that condition for services and treatment.

Preventing Sex Trafficking and Strengthening Families Act of 2014

child holding flowersNew federal legislation, Preventing Sex Trafficking and Strengthening Families Act of 2014 (H.R. 4980), now requires state child welfare agencies to:

  • Develop policies and procedures to identify, document, screen and determine appropriate services for children under the child welfare agency’s care and supervision, who are victims of, or at risk of, sex trafficking.
  • Immediately report children in their care identified as sex trafficking victims to law enforcement.  States must also report the numbers of child trafficking victims to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
  • Report children missing from their care to law enforcement, within 24 hours, for entry into the National Crime Information Center and to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.
  • Develop and implement protocols to locate children runaway or missing from foster care, determine the child’s experiences while absent from care, develop screening to determine if the child is a sex trafficking victim, and report this information to HHS.
  • Develop a reasonable and prudent parenting standard for foster parents to make parental decisions to maintain the health and safety of foster youth and also to make decisions about the youth’s participation in extracurricular, enrichment, cultural and social activities.
  • Ensure that children in foster care age 14 or older participate in the development of, or revision to, his or her case plan which must describe the foster child’s rights.
  • Provide children aging out of foster care with a birth certificate, a social security card, health insurance information, medical records and a driver’s license or state identification.

NCSL tracked activity related to these provisions during the 2014 legislative session. The legislation included providing drivers’ licenses and other records to youth aging out of care, enacting foster child bill of rights legislation, enacting reasonable and prudent parenting standards and enacting legislation related to human/child sex trafficking and missing children.

Drivers Licenses and Other Records Provided to Youth Aging Out of Foster Care

  • Florida allowed a foster child that has reached 16 years of age, has been adjudicated independent, is residing in an out-of-home placement and has completed a driver education course to execute all contracts or agreements to obtain motor vehicle insurance.

Foster Child Bill of Rights

  • California authorized a dependent child or a non-minor dependent to request visitation with a sibling who is in the physical custody of a common legal or biological parent.
  • Illinois required the Department of Children and Family Services to provide each parent or guardian and responsible adult caregiver participating in a safety plan a copy of the plan and information on their rights and responsibilities that shall include information on how to obtain medical care, emergency phone numbers and information on how to notify schools or day care providers.

For more, view NCSL Foster Care Bill of Rights.

Human Trafficking/Child Trafficking Victims

  • Alabama established the Alabama Human Trafficking Task Force.
  • California also authorized any city, county, or community-based nonprofit organization to establish a multiagency, multidisciplinary family justice center to assist victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, elder or dependent adult abuse, and human trafficking.
  • Colorado created the Colorado Human Trafficking Council within the Department of Protective Services and specified the Council’s membership and duties.
  • Colorado changed the definition of human trafficking of an adult and of a child to include the distinction that the trafficking was for the purpose of either involuntary or sexual servitude and that human trafficking of a minor for sexual servitude is to be considered a sex offense against a child for which there is no statute of limitations.
  • Connecticut expanded the actions the Department of Children and Families can take to help children it identifies or believes are victims of trafficking to include (1) providing services, (2) forming multidisciplinary teams to review trafficking cases, and (3) providing training to law enforcement officers about trafficking and expanded the category of children or youths a court may find to be “uncared for” to include child-trafficking victims.
  • Maryland required the Secretary of State to establish the Human Trafficking Address Confidentiality Program for victims of human trafficking.
  • Florida prohibited the buying and selling of children into prostitution, clarified court procedures related to child sex trafficking and required screening and services for child sex trafficking victims.
  • Michigan created a presumption that a minor prosecuted for prostitution is a victim of human trafficking and is eligible for services provided to dependent minors subjected to abuse and neglect.
  • Michigan lawmakers also required a supervising agency that develops a medical passport for a child under its care to indicate in the passport that the child could be a victim of human trafficking and, if so, to have an assessment or evaluation of the child performed by an experienced and licensed mental health professional and provide appropriate counseling services. The legislation required a supervising agency, before placing a child in its care, to give special consideration to information that the child might have been a victim of human trafficking and allowed a supervising agency to find that adoption, reunification, or other traditional foster care services might not be suitable for a child who was a human trafficking victim.
  • Ohio authorized a judge or magistrate to order the testimony of a minor victim of human trafficking to be taken by closed circuit television equipment and prohibited disclosure of identifying information in a police report concerning a delinquent offender or abused minor. The bill further enacted the offense of commercial sexual exploitation of a minor.
  • Utah detailed that a child is not subject to a delinquency proceeding for prostitution unless a law enforcement officer has referred the child to the Division of Child and Family Services on at least one prior occasion for an alleged act of prostitution or sexual solicitation.
  • Wisconsin amended the definition of “trafficking” by eliminating the element that the act occurred without the individual’s consent and expanded the definition of “commercial sex act.”

Missing Children

  • Georgia allowed for missing child reports for foster children within the Missing Children Information Center and required certain procedures of law enforcement when any parent, guardian, caretaker, government unit responsible for the child, or other person with legal custody of the child, reports the child is missing.

For more on child sex trafficking and missing children, view Preventing Sex Trafficking and Strengthening Families Act of 2014.

Reasonable and Prudent Parenting Standard

Washington provided caregivers with the authority to give permission without prior approval of the Department of Social and Health Services or a court to allow a child in their care to participate in normal childhood activities based on a reasonable and prudent parenting standard through the use of careful and thoughtful parental decision-making. The bill defined normal childhood activities to include extracurricular, enrichment, and social activities, and may include overnight activities outside the direct supervision of the caregiver. The legislation characterized a reasonable and prudent parent standard as thoughtful parental decision-making intended to maintain the child’s health, safety, and best interest while encouraging the child’s emotional and developmental growth.

For more legislation, see NCSL Reasonable and Prudent Parenting Standard Laws.

Reporting of Child Abuse and Neglect

sad childDuring 2014, 14 states enacted 35 bills related to the reporting of child abuse and neglect. Topic areas included expanding categories of mandatory reporters, addressing immunity and requirements for organizations, reporting of abuse within schools, substance abuse and training and licensing.

Expanding Categories of Mandatory Reporters

  • Connecticut clarified the process by which animal control officers and employees of the Department of Children and Families report instances of animal abuse and neglect.
  • Connecticut lawmakers also required animal control officers to report to the Commissioner of Agriculture, as soon as practicable, if they have reasonable cause to suspect that an animal has been harmed, neglected or treated cruelly.

Immunity/Requirements for Organizations

  • South Carolina prohibited an employer from dismissing, demoting, suspending, or disciplining an employee who reports child abuse or neglect, whether required or permitted to report; and, created a cause of action for reinstatement and back pay which an employee may bring against an employer who violates this prohibition.
  • Washington defined terms that are used throughout the mandatory reporting statute to include the terms organization, reasonable cause, and sexual contact. Clarified that when any person, in his or her official supervisory capacity with a nonprofit or for-profit organization, has reasonable cause to believe that a child has suffered abuse or neglect caused by a person over whom he or she regularly exercises supervisory authority, he or she shall report such incident. The legislation specifically defined organization to include: a sole proprietor, partnership, corporation, limited liability company, trust, association, financial institution, governmental entity other than the federal government, and any other individual or group engaged in a trade, occupation, enterprise, governmental function, charitable function, or similar activity in this state whether or not the entity is operated as a nonprofit or for-profit entity.

Reporting of Abuse within Schools

  • Pennsylvania required that when a school employee suspects another school employee of abusing a student, the standard for substantiating abuse, the reporting requirements and procedures, and the investigative response will parallel those for other alleged perpetrators of child abuse.

Substance Abuse

Minnesota required local welfare agencies to accept reports of prenatal exposure to controlled substances made by reporters notwithstanding the refusal of the reporter to provide the reporter’s name and address, as long as the report is otherwise sufficient.

Training/Licensing

  • Illinois required the acceptance of continuing education credit for mandated reporter training on how to recognize and report child abuse offered by the Department of Child and Family Services and completed by any person who holds a professional license and who is a mandated reporter under the Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act.
  • Indiana required reporting related to the safety of children and information to be prepared and distributed concerning the duty to report known or suspected child abuse or neglect.
  • Maryland required the Naturopathic Medicine Advisory Committee within the Board of Pharmacy and the State Board of Nursing to adopt regulations for the potential suspension of a license for failure to report child abuse or neglect.
  • New York required school athletic directors and school personnel or other persons required to hold a temporary coaching license or professional coaching certificate to report cases of suspected child abuse.
  • Pennsylvania required licensing boards to require licensees to submit documentation of completion of a minimum number of hours of approved child abuse recognition and reporting training.

Other

  • Pennsylvania lawmakers addressed a number of reporting issues including: confidentiality; broadening the scope of mandated reporters; reports by employees, independent contractors and staff members of organizations that are required to report; privileged communications and exceptions from reporting requirements; advanced communication technology and electronic reporting; establishment of a pending complaint file, a file of unfounded reports and a toll-free telephone number; protection from employment discrimination for reporting child abuse or suspected child abuse and penalties for failure to report, interference with making a report and concealment of abuse to protect another.

Services for Older Youth

teenagers standing togetherFifteen bills were enacted in 12 states addressing services and supports for older youth in the foster care system. For more, view NCSL’s Supports for Older Youth in Foster Care.

Engaging Youth

  • Illinois required the Department of Children and Family Services to convene and maintain a Statewide Youth Advisory Board and regional youth advisory boards to help the Department determine how to best provide services to current and former youth in foster care living in each of the regions.

Extended Foster Care

  • Nebraska renamed the Young Adult Voluntary Services and Support Act the Young Adult Bridge to Independence Act and made changes to the program to allow young adults to remain in extended guardianship until they turn 21 regardless of whether they are regularly attending school or training program.
  • Washington expanded eligibility criteria to allow a youth to request extended foster care services if the youth engages in employment for 80 hours or more per month or if the youth is not able to engage in any established qualifying activities due to a documented medical condition. Defined “medical condition” to mean a short-term or long-term physical or mental health condition as verified and documented by any licensed health care provider.
  • Wisconsin extended out-of-home care to 21 years of age for children with individualized education programs.

Housing

  • California authorized a county to, at its option, extend transitional housing to a former foster youth who is not more than 25 years of age, and for a total of 36 cumulative months, if the former foster youth is completing secondary education or is enrolled in an institution that provides post-secondary education.
  • Massachusetts promoted housing and support services to unaccompanied homeless youth.

Prevention

  • Rhode Island created a youth pregnancy and at-risk prevention services program to be administered by the Department of Human Services.

Transitional and Independent Living Services

  • Rhode Island requested that the Department of Children, Youth and Families examine best policies and practices in the transition for youth aged 18-21 who leave the child welfare system.
  • Virginia required local departments of social services and child-placing agencies to provide independent living services to any person between 18 and 21 years of age who is transitioning from a commitment to the Department of Juvenile Justice to self-sufficiency when such individual was in the custody of the local department of social services immediately prior to his commitment and to ensure that local departments that provide independent living services to persons between 18 and 21 years of age make certain the information about the availability of independent living services is provided to any person who chooses to leave foster care or who chooses to terminate independent living services before his 21st birthday.

Tuition Assistance

Three states—Arizona, California and Illinois—enacted legislation regarding education of older youth through tuition waivers or assistance.

  • Arizona modified requirements for qualified students under Lexie’s Law, which provides for tax credits for corporations which donate to School Tuition Organizations, so that any student who is a prior qualified student who continues to attend a qualified school, is placed in foster care, or is identified as having a disability under relevant laws is eligible for the program.
  • California authorized the Office of the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges to enter into agreements with community college districts to provide additional funds for services in support of postsecondary education for foster youth.
  • Illinois required the Department to select a limited number of students who are in foster care, who aged out of care at age 18 or older, were formerly under foster care but were adopted, or who have been placed in private guardianship, to receive scholarships and fee waivers to assist them in attending and completing their post-secondary education at a community college, university, or college.
  • Maryland added unaccompanied homeless youths to the list of individuals who may be eligible for a waiver of certain tuition and fees at public institutions of higher education; requires a financial aid administrator to verify that the youth qualifies as an independent student under the Federal College Cost Reduction and Access Act.

Termination of Parental Rights

Eight states enacted twelve bills around termination of parental rights.

  • Alabama required the juvenile court to have exclusive original jurisdiction over termination of parental rights proceedings and expressed the intent of the Legislature regarding jurisdiction of the juvenile court in termination of parental rights cases and provided for retroactivity to Jan. 1, 2009.
  • Colorado created a process for reinstatement of the parent-child legal relationship in limited circumstances for a child whose parent’s rights have previously been terminated voluntarily or involuntarily.
  • Missouri allowed for drug use or prior drug convictions to be considered in determining parental fitness in termination of parental rights proceedings; and, addressed children who test positive for alcohol or drugs at birth.
  • Oklahoma provided for termination of parental rights if substantial erosion of relationship exists; provided for a signed voluntary agreement to termination of parental rights; modified timing of out-of-home placements based on age of the child; clarified dates used to determine entry into foster care; added rape, pornography, murder, felony assault or causing the death of a sibling to list of termination of parental rights conditions; required termination of parental rights if no measurable parental progress is made within a certain time period and addressed parental rights to an Indian child.
  • South Carolina provided that a family court may order termination of parental visits and termination of parental rights due to continued parental drug abuse and required a drug test before returning a child to the parents’ care when the removal of the child was due to parental drug use.

Tribes

Child standing in field

  • Colorado required notification of an Indian tribe in accordance with the federal Indian Child Welfare Act in cases where a termination of parental rights petition is being filed against a person who committed a sexual assault in which a child was conceived.
  • Iowa required county attorneys to comply with provisions of the Iowa Indian Child Welfare Act and the federal Indian Child Welfare Act.
  • Minnesota provided that in a proceeding for the pre-adoptive or adoptive placement of an Indian child not within a specified jurisdiction, the court, in the absence of good cause to the contrary, shall transfer the proceeding to the jurisdiction of the tribe.
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“YOUR CHILDREN ARE A PRIVILEGE NOT A “RIGHT” SAME AS YOUR CAR AND HOME THE SOCIAL SERVICES ARE IN CONTROL “OMG”

coat and tie

kid jumpingThe National Conference of State Legislatures’ (NCSL) Child Welfare Project in the Children and Families Program tracks legislative enactments related to the safety, permanence and well-being of children and families through its yearly compilation of state legislative enactments.

During the 2014 legislative session, NCSL identified at least 294 child welfare-related bills enacted in approximately 45 states.

This report provides an overview of those enactments in the following major topic areas: administration/ oversight/interagency collaboration, adoption, child fatality, child protection, courts and legal representation, education of children in foster care, foster care, fostering connections to success act of 2008, funding, infant abandonment, kinship care, prevention, reporting of child abuse, services for older youth and termination of parental rights. The largest number of legislative enactments occurred within the topics of foster care, child protection and reporting.

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False child report by Women “The hate start’s here” “KILL” Them

coat and tie

 

Upset businesswoman standing behind bars in jail

Health Impact News

A Florida woman was recently arrested for making too many false charges of child abuse to the Florida Department of Children and Families, which were reportedly directed against two families. When asked why she made the multiple false child abuse charges, her reply reportedly was  “to create havoc.”

According to Chipleypaper.com, Jessica Elizabeth Combee, 28, of Westville, Florida is charged with 28 felony counts of false child abuse reports, and is currently being held in the Holmes County Jail with a $28,000.00 bond.

“This is just one example of how people use the ‘system’ to carry out their agenda against whomever they felt has done them wrong,” said Bonifay Police Chief Chris Wells. (Source.)

While we frequently report abuses from within State run Child Welfare programs such as CPS, which can lead to innocent families being torn apart, we do want to acknowledge when a child welfare agency does the right thing and takes the time to prosecute someone who is falsely accusing families of child abuse.

As the testimony from the Bonifay Police Chief reveals, this is a common practice of how people abuse the child welfare system for their own agenda. We hope that more people will be prosecuted for abusing the system, including not just nosy neighbors or jealous family members, but medical personnel as well who take out their anger against parents who choose not to follow their medical advice, or want to seek a second medical opinion. Those doctors also deserve to be arrested and prosecuted for false charges

– See more at: http://medicalkidnap.com/2014/12/26/woman-arrested-for-filing-28-false-child-abuse-reports-in-florida/#sthash.DShsp2PJ.dpuf

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We are to “TRUST” Social Services” There “ALL” “DRUNK”

 

coat and tie

WASHINGTON, BEAUFORT COUNTY –

[UPDATE 6/12] A Department of Social Services supervisor arrested for DWI while she was on call has been fired, an official told NewsChannel 12 Thursday.

Karma Davis Warren, 43, of Washington, has been terminated from her position as a supervisor for the DSS in Pitt County, said Kiara Jones, the county’s director of public information.

PREVIOUS STORY:

A Department of Social Services supervisor was arrested for DWI after she was found passed out behind the wheel of her car while she was on call, police said.

According to documents from the Washington Police Department, 43-year-old Karma Davis Warren was found passed out behind the steering wheel of her car while the engine was running. It happened at about 3:44 a.m. on May 21.

The vehicle was parked near BB’s Tavern in Washington.

The police report states, “She had difficulty staying awake initially and had problems rolling her window down. Her breath emitted an odor of an alcoholic beverage. She was unsteady on her feet while walking. She had droopy eyelids”

Warren, of Washington, blew a .18 on her breathalyzer test, according to police. She was charged with driving while impaired and was issued a $500 bond.

Warren is a supervisor for the Department of Social Services in Pitt County. She was on call when the alleged incident happened, said Interim DSS Director Earl Marett. The county was paying Warren $1 an hour to be on call.

Marett said he could not give details on Warren’s employment situation because it is a personnel matter.

But Marrett did say three people are on call for Pitt County DSS at all times.

“We generally have a social worker on call to investigate the abuse and neglect of children. We also have a social worker supervisor on call to assist them in some cases that require two-party involvement. We also have an attorney on call for legal advice at night too,” Marett said.

Marett said even if the supervisor cannot be contacted, there’s a chain of command and the DSS worker would never be left without help.

NewsChannel 12 tried to talk with Warren, but could not reach her. Her court date is scheduled for Aug. 12.

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Social Services “STEALS” KILL”S “KID”S “WHY DO WE NOT FIGHT”

coat and tie

 

Social Services Supervisor Arrested Again On Fraud Charges

October 25, 2000

WATERBURY — A supervisor at the state Department of Social Services who was charged two months ago with welfare fraud was arrested again Tuesday and accused of taking funds intended for welfare recipients, authorities said.

Helen “Pearl” Byrd, 66, of 220 Chipper Road in Waterbury, a department supervisor for 20 years, is accused of diverting more than $180,000 by making illegal credits to the electronic benefits accounts of at least five welfare recipients between June 1998 and August 2000.

Byrd was charged Tuesday with four counts of first-degree larceny by defrauding a public community, felony counts that carry a maximum prison term of 20 years each.

In the latest charges, Byrd is accused of making illegal benefit credits to the accounts of four female recipients. Byrd would then tell the women that she made a mistake and ask them to return the funds, estimated at more than $37,000, which they did, according to the office of Chief State’s Attorney John M. Bailey, which conducted the investigation.

In August, Byrd was arrested on larceny and fraud charges in connection with another scheme in which she made illegal credits to the account of welfare recipient Griselle Ramirez, 28, according to Bailey’s office. Byrd and Ramirez, who also was arrested in August, would then share the illegally diverted funds, authorities said.

Byrd was released Tuesday on a promise to appear in Waterbury Superior Court on Nov. 8.

 

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Real killers of CHILDREN in America

imgG5

 

 

DSS worker arrested after boy found handcuffed to porch with dead chicken around neck

Posted November 15, 2013
Updated November 16, 2013

— Authorities arrested a Union County Department of Social Services worker and a Monroe man Friday night after an 11-year-old boy was found handcuffed to the front porch of a home with a dead chicken tied around his neck, investigators said.

WBTV of Charlotte reported a deputy was answering an animal services complaint next door to the home on Austin Road, south of Monroe, when he saw a child secured to the front porch at the ankle, by what appeared to be a pair of handcuffs.

The child also had a dead chicken hanging around his neck, and appeared to be shivering, the deputy said.

Moments later, 57-year-old Dorian Lee Harper appeared on the porch along with another child who released several large dogs onto the officer.

When additional officers arrived, they removed five children from the home.

According to authorities, Harper and Wanda Sue Larson, 57, were arrested.

Larson was a supervisor with Union County Department of Social Services.

Officials told WBTV that while Larson was not present at the time the children were discovered, she is accused of being complicit in the ongoing mistreatment of the children. She and Harper had adopted four of the children, and were serving as foster parents of the 11-year-old, who was found on the porch.

Harper and Lawson were being held in the Union County jail Friday. Both were scheduled to be in court Monday.

Harper and Larson were charged with intentional child abuse, inflicting serious injury, false imprisonment and cruelty to animals, according to authorities.

The children are now in the custody of an undisclosed Social Services agency outside of Union County.

Read more at http://www.wral.com/sheriff-dss-worker-arrested-after-boy-found-handcuffed-to-porch-with-dead-chicken-around-neck/13117884/#r7SmriArqsTbzt0F.99

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Alex Jones is telling the TRUTH

 

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LOOKNG FOR WORK “HELP”

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Alvin Lester Davis
1555 MLK Fayetteville ARK 72701
949-278-6549 / 479-316-9766 alvindavis99@gmail.com
Driving Lic: 935715029 Arkansas Expire: July 15, 2019
Stationary Engineer/English Teacher
Summary of Experience
· Supervising mechanics on Central Plant equipment and Boiler Rooms for Industrial Plant, Hospitals and Airports.
· In excess of 15 years with civilian and mechanical engineering equipment concerned with the maintenance and repairs of wide range of equipment in boiler rooms operation and maintenance such as four (4) units of oil fired high temperature water boilers with a capacity of 45,000,000 BTU/hr. per unit and four (4) Centrifugal Refrigeration Units with a capacity of 5000 tons per unit, Water and Waste Treatment Plants, Utilities Supports, and D.I. system for a Pharmaceutical Company.
CIP School in Angeles City www.cipschool.com
January 2009 to October 2014
Teacher
· Teaching Korean and Japanese student all English subjects
· As of May 2011 took over as Head Teacher of 58 Teachers and 80 Students
Shane English School –Dongying, China
January 2008 to September 2009
English Teacher
· Taught 5yr to 15yr old Chinese children with a class size of 8 to 32 equaling 200 students a week.
· Taught Basic English to advanced English in a night class of 20yr to 40yr people
· Skill’s Interviews, passing SAT for enrollment for the USA
Novartis– Emeryville, CA
Novartis Vaccines & Diagnostics, Inc.
4560 Horton Street
Emeryville, CA.94608-2916
(800) 524-4766
2006 to 2008
Master Mechanic
· Served as Master Mechanic for 22 Buildings with Pharm Equipment, such as: Boilers, Chillers, Sterilizers and performed P.M’s Corrective Maintenance.
VERIZON DATA BASE –Sacramento, CA
2005-2006
3635 N Freeway Blvd, Spc 100
Sacramento, CA 95834
(916) 419-6200
H.V.A.C. TECH / SUPERVISOR
· Responsibilities included: Chillers, Boilers, H.V.A.C. System in the Building. P.M.’s Corrective Maintenance On all Building System’s, including but not limited to VAV, Air-Handlers, Cooling Towers, Helping the Electricians on there Craft as well.
COMPUTER SCIENCES CORP –(EUSA CH-47 FLIGHT SIMULATOR UNIT 15367 APO) / South Korea, AP
Boeing / L3 703-876-1000 3170 Fairview Park DrFalls Church, VA 22042-4516
2002 to 2005
Stationary Engineer / HVAC Engineer
· Repair of Chillers, Boilers, working with Building Control Systems.
· Teaching English and Engineering A.C.T. to 20,166 Collage Students
· Supervising HVAC tech’s for all Army Bases in South Korea
Yamas Controls
1 S Linden Avenue
South San Francisco, CA 94080 Phone:
2001 to 2002
Chiller Specialist
· Working with Company’s such as Genentech, Highland Hospital, Our Lady of Holy Angels.
· Responsibilities: Repair of Chillers, Boilers, Air-Handling Units, Controls
· Equipment: Trane, Clever-Brooks, Westinghouse, Carrier, Copeland.
· Left Company to go overseas.
Saudi Oger Ltd — Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
1996 to 2001
HEAD OFFICE
P. O. Box 1449
Riyadh 11431 Saudi Arabia
Tel. No. : (966-11) 4773115
Fax No. : (966-11) 477-0079
Supervisor/H&C Maintenance
· King Khalid International Airport Project
· Utilities Division, Heating & Cooling Section
· Supervising Maintenance personnel of Central Plant Heating & Cooling Section composed of Foremen, Lead Mechanics, Mechanics, HVAC Personnel, I&C Technicians, and Plant Electricians.
· Responsibilities: include plant machinery’s e.g. four (4) Centrifugal Refrigeration Units, each with a capacity of producing 5000 tons per hour of chilled water, four (4) diesel fuel oil fired high temperature water boilers, each with a capacity of producing 45,000,000 BTU per hour with an output temperature of 204OC, six (6) cooling towers and fans, CHW & HTW piping equaling a total length of 12.8 Kilometers. In addition, submitting daily, weekly and monthly reports to the Superintendent and Project Manager.
· Maintenance Duty Officer: On many occasions assumed the duties and responsibilities for all contractual decisions and work co-ordinations at the KKIA Airport during night shifts and weekends.
Boot’s Pharmaceutical Co. –Shreveport, LA
1993 to 1996
3188618200
8800 Ellerbe Shreveport, LA71101
Chief Stationary Engineer of Central Plant
· Responsibilities: included (4) 1000 tons Trane Centrifugal Units, (4) 250 PSI water tube steam Ryans D.I. Water system, 4 Culligan water softeners. Also responsibilities submit time sheets, scheduling of shifts, man-hour reports, monthly reports, weekly reports, chemical reports. Compressors, Super Cooled Systems, Automatic Controls for Boilers & Chillers, Barbare / Colman, Blue Prints, P.I.D. Fiber Optic Systems. February 1996 went to Saudi Arabia (company was sold to B.A.S.F)

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ALEX JONES AND THE STORY OF DONALD TRUMP

Alexander EmerickAlexJones (born February 11, 1974) is an American conspiracy theorist,[1][2]radio show host, documentary filmmaker, and writer.[3] His syndicated news/talk show The Alex Jones Show, based in Austin, Texas, airs via the Genesis Communications Network[4] and shortwave station WWCR[5] across the United States, and on the Internet in video form.[6][7]

Jones has been the center of many controversies, including his controversial statements about gun control in the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting.[8] He has accused the U.S. government of being involved in the Oklahoma City bombing,[9] the September 11 attacks[10] and the filming of fake Moon landings to hide NASA‘s secret technology.[11][12][13] He believes that government and big business have colluded to create a New World Order through “manufactured economic crises, sophisticated surveillance tech and—above all—inside-job terror attacks that fuel exploitable hysteria”.[14] Jones describes himself as a libertarian, paleoconservative and an “aggressive c onstitutionalist“.[15][16]

New York magazine described Jones as “America’s leading conspiracy theorist”,[17] and theSouthern Poverty Law Center describes him as “the most prolific conspiracy theorist in contemporary America.”[18] When asked about these labels, Jones said that he is “proud to be listed as a thought criminal against Big Brother“.[17]                                                               https://youtu.be/m7n2AMpbAu4                                                                                                         https://youtu.be/FvpihVNsRTs                                    

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READ THIS CRAP !!!!!! WHITE IS NOT WHITE !!!!!

alvin in mustache

 

READ THIS CRAP !!!!!!

WHITE IS NOT WHITE !!!!!

White Hispanic and Latino Americans
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the white population of Latin America, see White Latin Americans.

This article possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. (June 2013)
White Hispanic and Latino Americans
Americanos hispanos y latinos blancos
Total population
(26,735,713[1]
8.7% of total U.S. population, 2010[1]
53.0% of all Hispanic and Latino Americans, 2010[1])
Regions with significant populations
All areas of the United States
California California 6,503,487[2]
Texas Texas 5,398,738[3]
Florida Florida 2,867,365[3]
Languages
American English • American Spanish • Spanglish • Nuyorican English
Religion
Predominantly Christianity
(mostly Roman Catholic, sizeable Protestant)
Minority Judaism and others.
Related ethnic groups
White Latin Americans, White Americans, Hispanic and Latino Americans
In the United States, a White Hispanic[4] is an American citizen or resident who is racially white (i.e., of primarily European descent) and of Hispanic descent. White American, itself an official U.S. racial category, refers to people “having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa” who reside in the United States.[5]

Based on the definitions created by the Office of Management and Budget and the U.S. Census Bureau, the concepts of race and ethnicity are mutually independent, and respondents to the census and other Census Bureau surveys are asked to answer both questions. Hispanicity is independent and thus not the same as race, and constitutes an ethnicity category, as opposed to a racial category, the only one of which that is officially collated by the U.S. Census Bureau. For the Census Bureau, Ethnicity distinguishes between those who report ancestral origins in Spain or Hispanic America (Hispanic and Latino Americans), and those who do not (Non-Hispanic Americans).[6][7] The U.S. Census Bureau asks each resident to report the “race or races with which they most closely identify.”[8]

White Americans are therefore referenced as “White Hispanic” and “Non-Hispanic Whites,” the former consisting of White Americans who report Hispanophone identity (Spanish Hispanic Latin America), and the latter consisting of White Americans who do not report Hispanophone ancestry.

As of 2010, 50.5 million or 16.3% of Americans identified as Hispanic or Latino.[1] Of those, 26.7 million, or 53%, also identified as WHITE!!!!!!!!

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2015 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 5,100 times in 2015. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 4 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

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5 Ways To Give To The Homeless This December

cip class july2012

 

5 Ways To Give To The Homeless This December


In this Oct. 4, 2013, photo, a person walks by the Right 2 Dream Too homeless camp in Portland, Ore.

In this Oct. 4, 2013, photo, a person walks by the Right 2 Dream Too homeless camp in Portland, Ore.

Don Ryan/AP

Every night, about 4,000 people in Portland sleep on the streets, in their cars or in a shelter.In October, the City Council declared a housing and homeless emergency, and in recent weeks local nonprofits have partnered with the city to open two new shelters for veterans and for women.

Here are five ways you can give to the homeless this winter.

In Kind Donations

Many shelters need new and gently-used blankets, coats, socks, hats, scarves and gloves for adults and children. Unused hygiene products, new underwear and hand warmers are also helpful. Here are wish lists and instructions for donating to nonprofits that run many of the shelters in the Portland metro area: Transition Projects, The Portland Rescue Mission, Street Roots,Human Solutions and Central City Concern.

The Right 2 Dream Too camp also accepts donations and supplies at the front desk on Fourth Street. Right2Dream Too appreciates supplies like tarps, sleeping bags, blankets, flashlights, and laundry vouchers.

Holiday Gift Drives

Bradley Angle, which provides services and housing to survivors of domestic violence, is inviting 200 families to pick out gifts from a “holiday shop” this year.

The nonprofit has a comprehensive list of toys, houseware and personal items they’re looking for online. The most popular gifts include gift cards to Fred Meyer, Target and Ross; gas gift cards; tickets to zoos, movies and kids parks; and art supplies.

The Portland Rescue Mission provides personal holiday gifts to each person in their addiction recovery program.

“We have their growth leaders picking out individual presents, for every single one of those 160 people, to get them something that’s really special to them,” said Mike Deacon, the Portland Rescue Mission’s engagement manager.  The organization says a $40 donation covers the cost of one gift.

Sock Drives

Socks are one of the most needed items at homeless shelters, and for the past 10 years, the outdoor store Next Adventure has partnered with its customers and with Wigwam socks to donate hundreds of pairs to Portland nonprofits.

On Saturday, Dec. 12, all socks in the store will be 20 percent off, and for every pair customers purchase, Next Adventure and Wigwam will donate a pair to Bradley Angle and P:ear, an organization that works with homeless youth.

“Warm, dry feet are very, very important, and as we started to think about people in their community that, the outdoors is their home. We realized that would be a great way to give back to the community,” said Deek Haycamp, co-owner of Next Adventure.

To get customers into the giving spirit, Haycamp dresses up as an elf and co-owner Bryan Knudsen makes an appearance as Santa.

Portland Commissioner Amanda Fritz also runs a city sock drive through Dec. 15.

Donation bins are in City Hall, the entrance to the Portland Building, at the Housing Bureau and Office of Equity and Human Rights in the Commonwealth Building on 6th Avenue, and at 1900 SW 4th.

Food

Transition Projects, which operates several of the city’s homeless shelters, relies on volunteer groups to help cook and serve meals:

The group purchases, prepares, and serves dinner to up to 90 residents at one of our temporary housing facilities (Clark Center,Doreen’s Place, or Jean’s Place.)

People interested in providing a meal can contact Lauren Holt at Transition Projects for more information: Lauren.Holt@tprojects.org or 503.280.4741.

The Oregon Food Bank accepts donations of both food and money. Cash donations help the organization purchase bulk food and cover expenses like trucks and freezers. The food bank has a list of its most needed foods online, including canned meat and beans, whole grains and shelf-stable milk.

Human Solutions, which runs Multnomah County’s winter family shelter, needs donations of milk, juice, instant oatmeal, cereal, fruit and children’s snacks.

The Portland Police Bureau Sunshine Division also accepts donations of food. The Sunshine Division operates a food pantry six days a week and uses first responders to deliver emergency food boxes to people in need. People can drop donations off at police precinct offices. The most needed items include cereal, tuna, rice and beans.

Finally, the Portland Rescue Mission says donations of $1.60 cover the cost of one meal at its Burnside shelter. People can donate online or at participating New Seasons and Whole Foods stores.

Help Out At a New Shelter

Transition Projects is looking for volunteers to help out at the city’s new temporary shelter at the Jerome Sears Army Reserve Center.

The organization is looking for volunteers who can help prepare and serve Sunday suppers and deliver bagged lunches for 150 people. Volunteers can also partner with Ride Connection to pick up vans and drive guests to and from the new shelter.

Do Good Multnomah has opened a new shelter for veterans in partnership with the First Congregational United Church of Christ. The shelter is looking for volunteers to help out at the shelter overnight, between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m.

More News

More OPB

Art is All in the Family

OPB | Dec. 17, 2015

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Go to a homeless person, and share what you want to share

http://www.homelessnessolutions.com

homeless family

Stop giving to organizations that just stuff the money in there pockets.  Go to a homeless person, and share what you want to share.

Most of the time, they will share what they have to you.

Most have worked there whole life, and paid TAX’s more then what is given to them.  There are endless ways to help the causes you believe in. Not only can you donate money, create charity fundraisers, or give charitable gifts, but you can also volunteer your time.

Here are several simple steps you can take to more actively participate in your local community and support charities around the world:

“It hasn’t crept up on us,” Commissioner Bratton said during a panel discussion on quality-of-life issues in New York, held by the Manhattan Institute, a right-leaning think tank. He also suggested the mayor had been slow to acknowledge the problem.

Utah Reduced Chronic Homelessness By 91 Percent; Here’s How

Advocates and officials say a few factors helped Utah near its goal of ending chronic homelessness.

For one, Utah is small. Ten years ago, when the efforts first started, there were nearly 2,000 chronically homeless people in Utah. By comparison, there are currently more than 29,000 chronically homeless individuals in California.

Second, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which has significant influence in Utah, was a big supporter of Housing First.

As well, Utah had a champion in Lloyd Pendleton — someone who believed in the idea and was willing to push politicians and advocates to go along.

And finally, most of the advocates and agencies in Utah know each other and work well with each other. They also know most of the homeless people by name.

Matching The Homeless With Homes

Every Tuesday in Salt Lake City, people in all the organizations that work with the chronically homeless gather in a small meeting room at a nonprofit called The Road Home.

On a recent Tuesday, Kevin Austin, the group’s housing supervisor, looks through a list of 86 chronically homeless people in the Salt Lake region who qualify for housing.

Even though Utah is committed to Housing First, there still isn’t enough housing for every one of the chronically homeless. And so the group has to assess need, and match the right apartment opening with the right person.

(For privacy reasons, NPR is not revealing clients’ names.)

For instance, there’s an opening at a group living site with shared bathrooms. Austin notes they need a candidate who is male and “plays semi-nice with others.”

One person recommends a name from the list. And just before the group is ready to finalize that decision and move on, Ed Snoddy, who does medical outreach for Volunteers of America, a faith-based nonprofit, speaks up.

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THE WORST MOVIE I EVER WATCHED “OMG” THE TREE OF LIFE

alvin in mustache

 

 

 

 

 

THE TREE OF LIFE

The Tree of Life is a 2011 American experimental drama film written and directed by Terrence Malick and starring Brad Pitt, Sean Penn, and Jessica Chastain. The film chronicles the origins and meaning of life by way of a middle-aged man’s childhood memories of his family living in 1950s Texas, interspersed with imagery of the origins of the universe and the inception of life on Earth.

After several years in development and missing 2009 and 2010 release dates,The Tree of Life premiered in competition at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, where it won the Palme d’Or. It ranked #1 on review aggregator Metacritic‘s “Top Ten List of 2011”,[4] and in January 2012 was nominated for threeAcademy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Cinematography.

Although early reviews for The Tree of Life were polarized, many critics and scholars have since declared the film a masterpiece. In the 2012 Sight & Soundcritics’ poll, 16 critics, including Roger Ebert, voted it one of the ten greatest films of all time; this placed it at #102 in the final list (making it the third film on the list which had been released since the year 2000, behind Wong Kar-wai‘sIn the Mood for Love and David Lynch‘s Mulholland Drive). The film also received five votes in the directors’ poll (placing it at #132),[5] and in 2015, theBBC listed it one of the 100 greatest American films ever made.[6]

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I WANT TO TEACH YOU ENGLISH TRY ME FOR FREE

 

Learn english with alvin (all)

image 1

www.homelessnessolutions.com
https://youtu.be/CeAma4pjjCc?t=18
www.alvindavis99.wordpress.com
Alvin Lester Davis
1555 MLK Fayetteville ARK 72701
949-278-6549 / alvindavis99@gmail.com
Driving Lic: 935715029 Arkansas Expire: July 15, 2019
Stationary Engineer/English Teacher
Summary of Experience
· Supervising mechanics on Central Plant equipment and Boiler Rooms for Industrial Plant, Hospitals and Airports.
· In excess of 15 years with civilian and mechanical engineering equipment concerned with the maintenance and repairs of wide range of equipment in boiler rooms operation and maintenance such as four (4) units of oil fired high temperature water boilers with a capacity of 45,000,000 BTU/hr. per unit and four (4) Centrifugal Refrigeration Units with a capacity of 5000 tons per unit, Water and Waste Treatment Plants, Utilities Supports, and D.I. system for a Pharmaceutical Company.
CIP School in Angeles City www.cipschool.com
January 2009 to October 2014
Teacher
· Teaching Korean and Japanese student all English subjects
· As of May 2011 took over as Head Teacher of 58 Teachers and 80 Students
Shane English School –Dongying, China
January 2008 to September 2009
English Teacher
· Taught 5yr to 15yr old Chinese children with a class size of 8 to 32 equaling 200 students a week.
· Taught Basic English to advanced English in a night class of 20yr to 40yr people
· Skill’s Interviews, passing SAT for enrollment for the USA
Novartis– Emeryville, CA
Novartis Vaccines & Diagnostics, Inc.
4560 Horton Street
Emeryville, CA.94608-2916
(800) 524-4766
2006 to 2008
Master Mechanic
· Served as Master Mechanic for 22 Buildings with Pharm Equipment, such as: Boilers, Chillers, Sterilizers and performed P.M’s Corrective Maintenance.
VERIZON DATA BASE –Sacramento, CA
2005-2006
3635 N Freeway Blvd, Spc 100
Sacramento, CA 95834
(916) 419-6200
H.V.A.C. TECH / SUPERVISOR
· Responsibilities included: Chillers, Boilers, H.V.A.C. System in the Building. P.M.’s Corrective Maintenance On all Building System’s, including but not limited to VAV, Air-Handlers, Cooling Towers, Helping the Electricians on there Craft as well.
COMPUTER SCIENCES CORP –(EUSA CH-47 FLIGHT SIMULATOR UNIT 15367 APO) / South Korea, AP
Boeing / L3 703-876-1000 3170 Fairview Park DrFalls Church, VA 22042-4516
2002 to 2005
Stationary Engineer / HVAC Engineer
· Repair of Chillers, Boilers, working with Building Control Systems.
· Teaching English and Engineering A.C.T. to 20,166 Collage Students
· Supervising HVAC tech’s for all Army Bases in South Korea
Yamas Controls
1 S Linden Avenue
South San Francisco, CA 94080 Phone:
2001 to 2002
Chiller Specialist
· Working with Company’s such as Genentech, Highland Hospital, Our Lady of Holy Angels.
· Responsibilities: Repair of Chillers, Boilers, Air-Handling Units, Controls
· Equipment: Trane, Clever-Brooks, Westinghouse, Carrier, Copeland.
· Left Company to go overseas.
Saudi Oger Ltd — Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
1996 to 2001
HEAD OFFICE
P. O. Box 1449
Riyadh 11431 Saudi Arabia
Tel. No. : (966-11) 4773115
Fax No. : (966-11) 477-0079
Supervisor/H&C Maintenance
· King Khalid International Airport Project
· Utilities Division, Heating & Cooling Section
· Supervising Maintenance personnel of Central Plant Heating & Cooling Section composed of Foremen, Lead Mechanics, Mechanics, HVAC Personnel, I&C Technicians, and Plant Electricians.
· Responsibilities: include plant machinery’s e.g. four (4) Centrifugal Refrigeration Units, each with a capacity of producing 5000 tons per hour of chilled water, four (4) diesel fuel oil fired high temperature water boilers, each with a capacity of producing 45,000,000 BTU per hour with an output temperature of 204OC, six (6) cooling towers and fans, CHW & HTW piping equaling a total length of 12.8 Kilometers. In addition, submitting daily, weekly and monthly reports to the Superintendent and Project Manager.
· Maintenance Duty Officer: On many occasions assumed the duties and responsibilities for all contractual decisions and work co-ordinations at the KKIA Airport during night shifts and weekends.
Boot’s Pharmaceutical Co. –Shreveport, LA
1993 to 1996
3188618200
8800 Ellerbe Shreveport, LA71101
Chief Stationary Engineer of Central Plant
· Responsibilities: included (4) 1000 tons Trane Centrifugal Units, (4) 250 PSI water tube steam Ryans D.I. Water system, 4 Culligan water softeners. Also responsibilities submit time sheets, scheduling of shifts, man-hour reports, monthly reports, weekly reports, chemical reports. Compressors, Super Cooled Systems, Automatic Controls for Boilers & Chillers, Barbare / Colman, Blue Prints, P.I.D. Fiber Optic Systems. February 1996 went to Saudi Arabia (company was sold to B.A.S.F)

Attachments area

 

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American Slang Dictionary!!! JUST A FEW

 

 

American Slang Dictionary

ABOUT EVERY TEN YEARS IT CHANGES:

A dictionary that explains commonly used American slang words can be a very useful resource for anyone interested in learning more about how language continues to evolve throughout the United States. YourDictionary includes definitions of the most common of these slang words and provides additional usage information in various slang articles.

About Slang in Popular Culture

Slang is defined as a casual type of language that is playful or trendy. It consists both of coined words and phrases and of new or extended meanings attached to established terms. Slang tends to develop from the attempt to find fresh and vigorous, colorful, pungent, or humorous expression.

Examples of common slang within the United States include:

  • Ankle biter – a derogatory term for an infant or small child
  • Bail – leaving in a hurry
  • Chillin’ – spending time with your friends
  • For real – speaking honestly and truthfully
  • Hooker – a female prostitute or someone who is behaving like a prostitute
  • In a New York minute – to do something very fast
  • Juiced – to be very excited or eager to do something
  • Knocked up – a woman coping with an unplanned pregnancy, usually someone who is either very young or unmarried
  • Queen – a homosexual man
  • Trashed – to be very drunk or to completely destroy someone’s property
  • Zonked – completely exhausted, very tired

Since a number of slang terms make reference to sex, violence, drugs, or crime, the use of slang is often seen by many people as an indicator of the speaker’s lower social status. Slang used by particular ethnic groups is also frequently looked down upon, although it should be noted that use of slang in everyday speech bears no relationship to the speaker’s intelligence.

Regional Slang Words

Some slang words are commonly used nationwide and appear in nationwide communication such as movies, television and magazines; but, some slang words have not gone mainstream and are used only in certain regions of the U.S.

For example here are a few regional slang words highlighted by HuffingtonPost.com:

  • Y’all (South and Texas) – a shorthand way to say “you all.” Do y’all want to go?
  • Fixin’ to (South and Texas) – a quick way to say “about to.” I’m fixin’ to go. Are you ready too?
  • Wicked (New England) – it translates as “really.” These lobsters are wicked good.
  • Clothes tree (Northeast) – a piece of furniture with extended arms that stands against the wall for hanging clothes.
  • Hella (Northern California) – a very casual slang word used as an adjective to describe something that is really good. The waves are hella good, so it is a great day to surf.
  • Bubbler (Eastern Wisconsin, eastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island) – identifies a public drinking fountain. It was so hot after my walk that I looked for a bubbler in the park.
  • Pank (Michigan’s Upper Peninsula) – another way to say compress or push down. I had to pank down the garbage so that I could get more into the can.
  • Bufflehead (Pennsylvania) – slang for idiot. The guy was a real bufflehead.
  • Whoopensocker (Wisconsin) – a shorthand way to describe something that is really terrific. This multi-level burger is a real whoopensocker.
  • Punee (Hawaii) – a small couch or day bed.

Using Slang

Slang should be avoided in most types of writing, especially academic research papers and essays. Screenwriters and novelists sometimes use certain expressions to add a touch of their character’s personality to specific bits of dialogue, but this tactic can backfire if the slang is obscure and thus unfamiliar to the reader.

Although slang is informal speech, it is not equivalent to jargon. Generally, jargon refers to terminology that is associated with a particular profession—such as medicine, law, or computer science.

American Slang Dictionaries Online

Since slang is constantly changing, it can be difficult to find definitions of certain terms in a printed dictionary. Luckily, there are many different websites offering online American slang dictionaries. For example:

  • SlangVocabulary is an extensive dictionary of slang and colloquialisms that is neatly organized and easy to use. Definitions are fairly short, but example sentences are provided for the majority of terms.
  • Urban Dictionary is a large website that allows users to submit their own definitions for various slang terms. While the quality of the information can sometimes be questionable, this site is often the best resource for learning more about obscure slang usage.
  • Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE) breaks the U.S. into multiple regions and subregions. It only includes words that are used regionally. Audio clips are included for many words, giving you the opportunity to hear the regional slang word being used.
  • ManyThings has a list of more than 280 American slang definitions sorted alphabetically. Example sentences are provided with each term to make it easier for you to understand the correct usage.
  • Dave’s ESL Cafe has a short guide to American slang designed to assist those who are learning English as a second language.

Although it’s not a dictionary in the traditional sense, Slang City is a great resource for anyone interested in learning more about the use of slang in America. This entertaining website features articles, illustrated topical guides to various types of slang, and interactive games such as the “Random Insult Generator.”

Read more at http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/slang/american-slang-dictionary.html#vRJx7WaKZBhDh6RD.99

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awesome! is it REALY!!!!!

all

http://www.homelessnessolutions.com

Awesome (adj) is such a popular slang word in English all over the world and you’ll hear everyone from the young to old saying it. When you use the word awesome, you’re expressing that you think something is wonderful or amazing. It can be used in a sentence or it could be used in a one word reply.

Example 1)

“What did you think of Wolf on Wall Street?”

“It was awesome! I loved it!” (They thought it was a great movie).

Example 2)

“I’ll pick you up at 1 pm, okay?”

Awesome.” (Here it shows you’re cool with the idea and you agree).

Example 3)

“My friend Dave is an awesome single guy. You guys would be perfect for each other!”

“Really? I’d love to meet him.”

Cool (adj) like awesome means ‘great’ or ‘fantastic’. It also shows that you’re okay with an idea. Be careful the normal meaning of cool means a little cold so you have to listen to it in context to understand what’s being said.       

Example 1)

“How’s the weather in Canada these days?”

“It’s getting cooler. Winter’s coming!” (This is the literal meaning a little cold)

Example 2)

“What did you think of my new boyfriend?”

“I liked him. He seemed like a cool guy!” (He seemed like a nice guy). 

Example 3)

“I’m throwing a party next week for my birthday. Do you want to come?”

Cool! Sure, I’d love to!”

To be beat (adj) In normal terms ‘beat’ would be used meaning ‘to win’Manchester United beat Liverpool, or ‘to hit’ Marko, stop beating your brother, however, in slang or everyday English it means something completely different. If you hear your friend saying I’m beat, it means he or she is very tired or exhausted.       

        Example 1)

“Do you want to go out tonight? There’s a cool new rock bar that’s just opened.”

“Sorry, I can’t. I’m beat and I have to wake up early tomorrow.”

Example 2)

“You look beat, what have you been doing?”

“I’ve been helping my dad in the yard all morning.”

To hang out (verb) If someone asks you where you usually hang out, they want to know in which place you prefer to be when you have free time. And if your friend asks you if you want to hang out with them, they’re asking you if you’re free and want to spend some time together. And what about if you ask your friend what they’re doing and they just answer hanging out? It means that they are free and not doing anything special.    

       Example 1)

“Hey, it’s great to see you again.”

“And you. We must hang out sometime.”

“I would love that. I’ll call you soon.”

Example 2)

“Paulo, where do you usually hang out on a Friday night?”

“If I’m not working, usually at the diner across the road from school.”

“Cool, I’ve been there a few times.”

Example 3)

“Hi Simon, what are you doing?”

“Nothing much, just hanging out with Sally.” (In this case you can just use the word hanging without the out and say “Nothing much, just hanging with Sally.”)

And if it’s used as a noun?  It refers to the place where you spend your free time.     

      Example 4)

“Joey, where are you, guys.”

“We’re at our usual hang out. Come down whenever you want!” (It could mean their favorite café, the gym or even the park).

To Chill Out (verb) Everybody loves to chill out but what does it mean? It simply means to relax. Usually it can be used with or without the word ‘out’ and if you’re speaking with a native English speaker they’ll definitely understand.      

      Example 1)

“Hey Tommy, what are you guys doing?”

“We’re just chilling (out). Do you want to come round?”

Example 2)

“Sue, what did you do in the weekend?”

“Nothing much. We just chilled (out).”

But if someone tells you need to chill out it’s not as positive. It means that they think you’re overreacting to a situation or getting stressed about silly little things.      

      Example 3)

“I can’t believe that test we just had. I’m sure I’m going to fail.”

“You need to chill out and stop thinking too much. I’m sure you’ll be fine.”

[

 

 

 

 

 

 

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HENRY DAVIS “ANCESTOR”

 

Ancestors and

Descendants of

Henry Davis

who came to

Bedford County, TN,

from

Brunswick County, VA,

between 1800-1810

The DAVIS family history

Henry Davis, who emigrated from Brunswick County, VA, to Bedford County, TN, has always

been well-documented within Bedford County land and historical records. It is known that he

came to TN at or about the same time as one of his brothers, Thomas Davis, during the first

decade of the nineteenth century. Thomas and Henry bought property in and near Shelbyville

and Fairfield, Bedford County, TN, and occasionally purchased land together. In 1819, Henry

purchased a mill near present day Fairfield, Bedford County; for a time, that area was known as

Davis’ Mill. Henry, his son, John S. Davis, and John’s son, Benjamin F. Davis, all served as postmasters

of Fairfield. The Davis family remained in Fairfield until at least 1870, based on the federal

census of that year. Sometime during the 1870s, my great-grandfather, Benjamin F. Davis,

Henry’s grandson, built the first brick store in nearby Wartrace and went into business there.

Henry and Thomas Davis have been traced back to Brunswick County, VA. They are listed in

their father’s will: Benjamin Franklin Davis, who died in Brunswick County, VA, in 1817.

Benjamin Davis’ will stated specifically that Henry and Thomas were living in “the County of

Bedford, State of Tennessee.” Without question, this is the same family. Even naming patterns

continue to this day.

Other families related by marriage to Henry Davis and his ancestors/descendants include:

  • Ballard
  • Bullock
  • Burt
  • Collier
  • Jennings
  • Marriott

This history is in two parts; each begins with my great-grandparents, Benjamin Franklin Davis,

of Wartrace, Bedford County, TN, and his wife, Margaret Anita Jennings. Part 1 begins with this

couple and traces their ancestors back to 17th century Virginia and the Carolinas. Part 2 was my

mother’s family history project, completed in 1978, and includes all known descendants of Ben

and Maggie Davis during the 100 years following their marriage. Any information about family

members included in the family history was written by that person, or by a family member who

knew him/her. At this time (June, 2009), none of the grandchildren of Ben and Maggie Davis are

living; the youngest grandchild, Evelyn Davis Ervin, died last summer. The last page of Part 2

lists deaths and marriages since 1978 for which I have records; unfortunately not all branches of

the family have remained in contact, and so this information is, of necessity, incomplete. In deference

to the privacy of the living, current addresses or the names of younger descendants are not

included with this document. However, if you are researching this family, you may contact me

through our family history website: http://www.a-trails.com

The data provided here is intended only as basic information, although I do have reference copies

of all data included. It is my hope that this information may assist genealogical researchers, and

may help other Bedford County, TN, Davis descendants trace their ancestry.

Carolyn German Bausinger

June, 2009

  • Powell
  • Rose
  • Sims
  • Swepson
  • Warren

Ancestors of

Margaret Anita Jennings

and

Benjamin Franklin Davis

Married on February 3, 1876

In 1978, Marguerite Howard German, a granddaughter of Margaret Jennings and Benjamin

Franklin Davis, assembled a history of their descendants for 100 years following the date of their

marriage, from 1876 – 1976. Copies were sent to all descendants of the Jennings-Davis family.

This supplemental document begins in 1876 and traces earlier generations of both families. A list

of many sources is included. Some sources, however, are written notes based on conversations

with older family members; these were written by the children and grandchildren of Maggie and

Ben Davis. Only information which could be verified has been included here.

The Jennings family history is straightforward and brief. The original member of that family to

emigrate from England to the colonies was John Jennings, who (it is believed) received an eighteenth

century land grant in South Carolina, from King George III. The Jennings family is welldocumented

in South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Texas and other southern states. John

Jennings is listed as a Revolutionary War patriot by the Daughters of the American Revolution.

The Davis family relationships are extensive, convoluted and often difficult to follow. Benjamin

Franklin Davis’ parents were related to each other; and members of the Sims, Burt and other

families intermarried through a number of generations. Tracing them and noting these marriages

has been interesting! At least six Revolutionary War patriots are known to be among our Davis

ancestors: Leonard Henley Sims and Dempsey Powell of NC; Benjamin Davis, John Rose,

William Burt, and Richard Swepson, Sr., of VA. It is very possible there are others, as well.

No attempt has been made to identify each generation as I, II, III, etc; the large number of overlapping

generations and intermarriages would make this both difficult and confusing.

Carolyn German Bausinger

June 2009

INDEX

DAVIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

BALLARD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

BULLOCK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

BURT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

JENNINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

MARRIOTT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

POWELL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

ROSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

SIMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

SWEPSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

WARREN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

SOURCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

5

NAME: Benjamin Franklin Davis

FATHER: John Sims Davis

MOTHER: Frances Lenoir Burt

DATE PLACE

BORN: 5 July 1845 Fairfield, TN

DIED: 15 August 1881 Fairfield, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: 1) Susan Catherine “Kittie” Scruggs 1 26 Dec 1871 Bedford County, TN

2) Margaret Anita “Maggie” Jennings 3 Feb. 1876 Bedford County, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Frances Eudora “Dora” 3 25 Oct. 1876 Wartrace, TN

Benjamin Franklin “Frank” 4 4 July 1878 Wartrace, TN

Gertrude (died at birth) 5 ca 1880 Wartrace, TN

Sara Blanche “Blanche” 6 5 Jan. 1881 Wartrace, TN

NOTES: 1) Ben F. Davis’ first wife, Kittie Scruggs Davis, was born 26 March 1849 in

Fairfield, Bedford County, TN and died 22 Jan 1875. She is buried next to Ben

Davis in the New Hope Baptist Church cemetery in Fairfield; no children.

2) Ben Davis appears in the 1870 census as living with his mother; in the 1880 census,

as a retired merchant of Wartrace. He appears, too, in Goodspeed and other histories

of both Fairfield, where he was a postmaster, and Wartrace, where he owned a store.

3) Dora Davis married Thompson Allen. Dora died 16 Sept 1965 in Irvington, VA.

  • One daughter, Margaret Almira Allen (1905-1982): married Paul Jones Myatt.

4) Frank Davis (B.F. Davis, Jr.) married Mary Jane Boyle on 4 April 1905. Frank died

on 22 August 1943 in Wartrace, Bedford County, TN.

  • Seven children:

Benjamin Franklin “Ben” Davis, III (1906-1995); married Mary Frances Thompson

Mary Boyle Davis (1908 – 2002); unmarried

Ralph Houston Davis (1910 – 1990); married Susanne Cannon Moore

Polly Ann Davis (1912 -1994); married Otto Charles Bohlander

Willellen Davis ( 1915-1999); married John W. Blinn

Robert Jennings “Pete” Davis (1922-1944); unmarried

Evelyn Davis (1926 -2008); married Max Gore Ervin

5) The baby’s name, Gertrude, was found in Dora Davis Allen’s handwritten family

history notes

6) Blanche Davis married Frederick John Howard, 1 Nov 1909 in Birmingham, AL.

Fred Howard died on 30 April 1930. Blanche married Sidney Herbert Lynn, on

2 Sept. 1932. Blanche died on 21 Dec. 1969, in Safety Harbor, FL.

  • Three children:

Frederick John Howard, Jr. (1912-2004); married Beulah Sellers

Victor George Howard (1914-1999); married Nell Fairchild

Sara Marguerite Howard (1916-1986); married Harold Leedom German

NAME: John Sims Davis

FATHER: Henry Davis

MOTHER: Nancy Powell Sims

DATE PLACE

BORN: 15 Nov 1818 Shelbyville, TN

DIED: 1 Apr 1867 1 Fairfield, TN2

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Frances Lenoir “Fannie” Burt 3 31 Mar 1842 Franklin County, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William Henry 5 ca 1844 Fairfield, TN

Benjamin Franklin 5 5 Jul 1845 Fairfield, TN

Nancy 5 ca 1848 Fairfield, TN

Thomas Burt 5 ca 1849 Fairfield, TN

John Sims 5 ca 1851 Fairfield, TN

Samuel Powell 5 ca 1852 Fairfield, TN

Robert L. 5 ca 1855 Fairfield, TN

Emma 5 ca 1858 Fairfield, TN

NOTES: 1) John Sims Davis is buried in the New Hope Baptist Church cemetery, Fairfield,

Bedford County. It is not known where Frances Burt Davis is buried; no grave

stone has been found. However, there is the base of a headstone on the right of

John Sims Davis’ marker, and this may mark her grave; her newspaper obituary

stated that she was buried in Fairfield, and this is the only logical location.

2) John Sims Davis is well documented in various sources within Bedford

County, including:

The Bedford County, Tennessee, Family History Book (published 2002 by the

Turner Publishing Co.) lists John S. Davis as a postmaster of Fairfield (p. 41).

The book also indicates (p. 130) that additional land for the construction of

New Hope Baptist Church in Fairfield was given by Fannie and John S. Davis.

3) Frances Burt and her husband, John Sims Davis were closely related through the

Sims, Powell and Burt lines.

4) 1850 Bedford County TN census P 82b Dist 1 HH 61-61:

John S Davis 32 M Tn Farmer $4,000 (son of Henry Davis & Nancy Sims)

Frances – 25 F NC (Burt, daughter of William Burt & Susanna Sims)

Henry – 6 M Tn, Benjamin – 4 M Tn, Thomas – 1 M Tn

5) Wm Henry Davis did not marry

Benjamin Franklin Davis married 1) Kittie Scruggs; and 2) Margaret Jennings

Nancy Davis died young; did not marry; buried New Hope Baptist churchyard

Thomas Burt Davis married Alice Finch

John Sims Davis married Julia March; their son, Henry Davis, started the annual

Wartrace Tennessee Walking Horse celebration during the 1930s.

Samuel Powell Davis married Paralee Walker

Robert L. Davis did not marry

Emma Davis — no information; an E.W. D. marker is next to her father’s grave.

6

NAME: Henry Davis

FATHER: Benjamin Franklin Davis

MOTHER: Tabitha Rose

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1785-1790 prob. Mecklenburg Co., VA

DIED: prior to1839 Bedford County, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Nancy Powell Sims 3 ca 1818 Bedford County, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: John Sims 4 15 Nov 1818 Bedford County, TN

Emily M. 4 ca 1820 Bedford County, TN

Sarah Ann 4 27 Apr 1822 Bedford County, TN

Virginia P. 4 25 Oct 1825 Bedford County, TN

Mary R. 4 ca 1826 Bedford County, TN

Charlotte S. 4 ca 1828 Bedford County, TN

NOTES: 1) Goodspeed History of Bedford County lists Henry Davis as an early settler.

2) The Bedford County, Tennessee, Family History Book (Turner Publishing Co.; 2002)

lists Henry Davis as an early mill owner (1819) and postmaster of Fairfield, TN.

3) Nancy Sims was the daughter of John Sims [p. 43] and Charlotte Powell [p. 34]

4) John Sims married Frances L. Burt [p. 30]; sister of Wm. Burt, who married John’s

sister, Virginia Davis

Emily Davis married George W. McQuiddy

Sarah Davis married William T. Edmunson

Virginia Davis married 1) Mr. Charlton (?); and 2) William H. Burt

Mary Davis married Wiley F. Stone

Charlotte Davis married Nathan A. Yeargin and moved to TX

5) Henry and his brother, Thomas Davis, arrived in Bedford County at or about the

same time. The brothers bought property separately and together in Shelbyville

and Fairfield, Bedford Co, TN ca. 1810-1820. They were sons of Benjamin Davis

of Brunswick County, VA, and listed in his April, 1817, will, filed in Brunswick

County (B.C. Will Book 8, pg. 342; B.C. Deed Book 24, pg. 52). During the

resulting property settlement in Oglethorpe County, GA, where their brother,

Benjamin Davis, Jr., lived, the residence of all the Davis siblings was provided:

“William Davis, John Brown and Elizabeth his wife, Martha Davis and Merritt

Davis of the County of Brunswick, State of Virginia, Benjamin Davis of Oglethorpe

County, State of Georgia, Peter Ragsdale of Bedford County, State of Tennessee,

as attorney in fact for Thomas Davis and Henry Davis of the County of

Bedford, State of Tennessee, and as attorney in fact for John Davis of the County

of Robertson, State of Tennessee…” (From Emigration to Other States From Southside

Virginia, Volume I, by Katherine B. Elliott; 1966.)

7

8

NAME: Benjamin Franklin Davis

FATHER: Henry Davis

MOTHER: Mary Marriott

DATE PLACE

BORN: Surry County, VA

DIED: April 1817 1 Brunswick County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Tabitha Rose 2 ca 1778-80 prob.Brunswick County,VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William

Elizabeth 3

Benjamin Franklin, Jr. 4 25 April 1784 VA

Martha

Merritt

Henry 5 ca 1785-90 VA

Thomas 5

John

NOTES: 1) Emigration to Other States from Southside Virginia, Volume I, includes a copy of

Benjamin Franklin Davis’ April, 1817 will; all living children are listed in the will.

(Original is in Brunswick County, VA, Deed Book 24, page 52)

2) Tabitha Rose was the daughter of John Rose [p. 38] and Abigail Hicks.

Tabitha Rose Davis died before 1810.

3) William, Elizabeth, Martha Merritt and John were living in Brunswick Co., VA,

at the time their father died in 1817.

Elizabeth married John Brown in Brunswick Co., VA, on 27 February 1800.

(Brunwick County Marriage Records, page 119)

4) Benjamin Franklin, Jr., moved, first, to GA land claimed by his father for service in

the GA militia during the Revolutionary War, and was living in Oglethorpe Co.,

GA, at the time his father died in 1817. In 1809, he sold part of that land. Later,

he moved to Autauga Co., AL. He married Martha Taylor, in 1816. Martha was the

daughter of Benjamin Taylor of Oglethorpe County, GA.

5) Henry and Thomas both moved to Bedford County, TN, about 1800-1810. When

their father’s will was probated, they were represented by Peter Ragsdale, a

Bedford County TN attorney, and named, specifically as living in the County of

Bedford, State of Tennessee.” Both men are well doucmented in Bedford County.

9

NAME: Henry Davis

FATHER: James Davis, Sr.

MOTHER: Elizabeth Warren

DATE PLACE

BORN: Surry County, VA

DIED: bef 17 March 1767 1 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Mary Marriott 2 ca 1732/33 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William Surry County, VA

Ann Surry County, VA

Hannah Surry County, VA

Benjamin 3 Surry County, VA

Isham Surry County, VA

Randolph Surry County, VA

Elizabeth 3 Surry County, VA

Henry Surry County, VA

Kezia Surry County, VA

Marriott Surry County, VA

Silvia Surry County, VA

James Surry County, VA

NOTES: 1) Virginia Historical Genealogies, by John Bennett Boddie, includes a chapter on this

Davis family, beginning on pg. 255. Date for his death is sometime between the

date of his will (Feb. 18, 1767) and the date it was probated (March 17, 1767).

The original of the will is filed in Surry County, VA—B.K. 1754-68, p.448.

2) Mary Marriott was the daughter of William Marriott [p. 31] and his wife, Sarah

Collier. William Marriott was the son of Matthias Marriot and his wife, Alice

Warren, daughter of Thomas Warren. Alice’s half brother, Thomas Warren, Jr., was

the father of Elizabeth Warren, who married James Davis, Sr., and was Henry

Davis’ mother.

3) Elizabeth Davis married John Rose in Brunswick County, VA, on January 28, 1775.

John’s sister, Tabitha Rose, married Elizabeth’s brother, Benjamin Davis (pp. 8, 37

and 38).

All children listed above were named in the will. There may have been other

children who died unmarried and before their parents.

10

NAME: James Davis, Sr.

FATHER: Thomas Davis

MOTHER: Elizabeth

DATE PLACE

BORN: ? Surry County, VA

DIED: 1746 1 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Elizabeth Warren 2 bef. 1704 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Thomas 3 Surry County, VA

Jane 3 Surry County, VA

John 3 Surry County, VA

James 3 Surry County, VA

Henry 3 Surry County, VA

Robert 3 Surry County, VA

Nathaniel 3 Surry County, VA

Anne 3 Surry County, VA

NOTES: 1) Virginia Historical Genealogies, by John Bennett Boddie, includes a chapter on this

Davis family, beginning on pg. 255. Date for his death is sometime after the date of

his will (Sept. 4, 1746).

2) Elizabeth Warren was the daughter of Elizabeth and Thomas Warren, Jr (see p. 57).

Mary Marriott, who married Henry Davis (son of James Davis, Jr., and Elizabeth

Warren), was Elizabeth’s cousin. Mary Marriott’s grandmother was Alice Warren

Marriott, who was the older half-sister of Thomas Warren, Jr.

3) Thomas Davis died 1848; lived Isle of Wight County, VA.

Jane Davis married a Warren.

John Davis may have moved to Brunswick County, VA.

James Davis died 1783; lived Surry County, VA; married Elizabeth Baldwin.

Henry Davis died 1767; lived Surry County, VA; married Mary Marriott.

Robert Davis died 1749; lived Pasquotank County, NC; married Sarah Chapman?

Nathaniel Davis may have moved to Hyde County, NC

Anne Davis married James Nicholson ca. 1740; their son, also named James,

married Elizabeth Woodruff.

All children listed above were named in the will. There may have been other

children who died unmarried and before their parents.

11

NAME: Thomas Davis

FATHER: Unknown

MOTHER: Unknown

DATE PLACE

BORN: Probably England

DIED: Sept 1716–Dec. 1720 1 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Elizabeth Unknown

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: James 2

Elizabeth 3 Surry County, VA

Thomas Surry County, VA

Jane Surry County, VA

Henry Surry County, VA

NOTES: 1) Virginia Historical Genealogies, by John Bennett Boddie, includes a chapter on this

Davis family, beginning on pg. 255. Date for his death is between the date of his

will (Sept. 28, 1716) and the date it was probated (Dec. 21, 1720).

Thomas Davis was in the Surry County Militia and appeared as a tithable in 1688.

His son, James, recieved a grant of 100 acres in Surry County in 1722, for imporing

his parents many years before. Since Thomas and his wife had lived in VA for

over 40 years, it is assumed they made a return trip to England.

2) I have assumed that James Davis was the oldest son of Thomas and Elizabeth

Davis, because his father left him “all land and houses” he possessed.

3) Elizabeth Davis married Matthew Ellis; their children, Matthew, Thomas, Elizabeth

and Isabel, were named in James Davis’ will.

All other children listed above were named in the will. There may have been other

children who died unmarried and before their parents.

The Ballard Family

Beginning with Salumith Ballard

Wife of William Burt

[See page 21]

13

NAME: Salumith Ballard

FATHER: William Ballard (believed to be William Sorrell Ballard

MOTHER: Elizabeth Clopton

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1750

DIED: 1841 Warren County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: William Burt ca 1780 ? Halifax County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William 11 Nov 1782 Warren County, NC

John A. 1 June 1800 Warren County, NC

Salumith “Sallie”

Lucretia A.

Elizabeth

Ann

Harriet D. ca 1797

NOTES: 1) See page 21 for notes about the children of Salumith Ballard and William Burt.

NAME: William Ballard

FATHER: John Ballard — unverified

MOTHER: Elizabeth Bland — unverified

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1715 VA

DIED: 2 Feb 1774 Halifax County NC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Elizabeth Clopton 2 ca 1735

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Mary 5 ca 1737 probably VA

Joyce 5 ca 1740 probably VA

Elizabeth 5 ca 1743 probably VA

William Sorrell 5 ca 1746 probably VA

Martha F 5 ca 1749 probably VA

Salumith 5 ca 1750 probably VA

Nancy Ann 5 ca 1751 probably VA

Walter Clopton 5 ca 1753 probably VA

Devereaux 5 ca 1756 probably VA

NOTES: 1) William Ballard is often written of as Captain William Ballard or as William

Sorrell Ballard

2) Elizabeth Clopton is said to be the daughter of Walter Clopton and Mary Jarrat;

the name, “Devereaux,” is from the Clopton family, which some researchers

believe can be traced as far back as the 12th century in Suffolk, England.

3) A Lunenburg County, VA, deed, dated 3 Dec 1735, mentions William Ballard.

4) William Ballard appears to have moved to the Scotland Neck area in Halifax

County, NC, ca. 1760.

5) The children of William and Elizabeth Ballard married:

Mary married Mr. Allen

Joyce married Mr. Langley

Elizabeth married Mr. Freeman

Martha married Mr. Finch

Nancy married General William Lenoir

Salumith married William Burt [p. 21]

Walter C. married Rebecca Taylor

Devereaux — no information

14

The Bullock Family

Beginning with Sarah Bullock

Wife of John Sims, Jr.

[See page 45]

NAME: Sarah Bullock

FATHER: Richard Bullock

MOTHER: Ann Henley

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1720 or earlier

DIED: 1766 Granville County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: John Sims, Jr. ca. 1734 Hanover County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William ca. 1736

Leonard Henley 2 July 1738

Elisha

Agness

Dorcas

Sarah

Susanna

Mary

Lucretia

Euphrates

NOTES: 1) See page 45 for notes about the children of Sarah Bullock and John Sims, Jr.

16

NAME: Richard Bullock

FATHER: Edward Bullock

MOTHER: Sarah Dalby

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1690

DIED: ca 1764 Granville County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Ann Henley ca 1710-1715 ? New Kent County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Agnes ca 1715

Susannah ca 1717

Zachariah ca 1718

Sarah ca 1720

William ca 1721

John ca 1724

Henry ca 1727

Anne ca 1728

Leonard Henley ca 1736

? Nathaniel

NOTES: 1) Ann Henley was the daughter of Leonard Henley and Elizabeth Richardson. She

was born in VA ca 1693 and died ca 1764 in Granville County, NC

2) Some sources list all the above children as those of Richard and Ann Henley

Bullock. Not all are verified, although records indicate that Sarah Bullock Sims was

one of their children. Certainly, the fact that one of her sons was named Leonard

Henley Sims would appear to support this.

17

The Burt Family

Beginning with Frances Lenoir Burt

Wife of John Sims Davis

[See page 6]

NAME: Frances Lenoir Burt

FATHER: William Burt

MOTHER: Susanna Sims

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca. 1826 Warren County, NC

DIED: 6 Aug 1891 Wartrace, Bedford Co., TN

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: John Sims Davis 31 Mar 1842 Franklin County, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William Henry 1 ca 1844 Fairfield, TN

Benjamin Franklin 1 5 Jul 1845 Fairfield, TN

Nancy 1 ca 1848 Fairfield, TN

Thomas Burt 1 ca 1849 Fairfield, TN

John Sims 1 ca 1851 Fairfield, TN

Samuel Powell 1 ca 1852 Fairfield, TN

Robert L. 1 ca 1855 Fairfield, TN

Emma 1 ca 1858 Fairfield, TN

NOTES: 1) See page 6 for notes about the children of Fannie Burt and John Sims Davis

19

NAME: William Burt

FATHER: William Burt

MOTHER: Salumith Ballard

DATE PLACE

BORN: 11 Nov. 1782 Warren County, NC

DIED: 31 Dec 1848 Winchester Springs,TN

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Susanna (or Susan) Sims 3 Nov 1812 Mecklenburg County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Elizabeth Jane ca 1813 NC

Sally Ann ca 1815 NC

Harriett Amanda 4 Aug 1817 Nash County, NC

William H. 1818/1819 Nash County, NC

Thomas S. 1819/1820 Nash County, NC

Susan A. before 1824 Warren County, NC

Frances Lenoir “Fannie” ca. 1826 Warren County, NC

Cassandra L. 6 Mar 1829 Nash County, NC

John L. 21 Oct 1830 Nash County, NC

Mary Ballard before 1832 Warren County, NC

Nash H. 27 Jun 1832 Nash or Warren Cty, NC

Richard Burt 4 Nov 1836 Nash or Warren Cty, NC

Lucy 1839

Salumith “Luna” 1840-1842

NOTES: 1) In 1838, William and Susanna Sims moved to Franklin County, TN.

2) William Burt made his will on 30 May 1848. All of the children listed above were

named in the will. Additional information from his will includes:

Lucy and Salumith were his youngest daughters

Sally Ann married Peter Arrington and lived in North Carolina

Harriett A. married James J. Phillips and lived in North Carolina

Elizabeth J. married John R. Horne; Elizabeth predeceased her father; she and

John Horne had three sons: Leonidas, Oscar and Clarence Horne

Frances L. married Mr. (John) Davis (see p. 6).

Susan A. married Mr. (John) Streeter

Thomas S. married Martha (MNU)

William H. Burt, his son, was one of three executors of William Burt’s will,

which was proved in Franklin County court on 7 Feb. 1849

3) Additional marriages of interest within the Davis-Sims families:

William H. Burt married Virginia P. Davis, sister of John Sims Davis (see p. 7).

Lucy Burt married William E. Sims; parents of Luna Mildred Sims (see p. 43).

4) After her husband’s death, Susan Sims Burt (see Sims Family, p. 44) moved to

Bedford County, TN, where she died on 1 Dec 1876. She is buried at Willow

Mount Cemetery in Shelbyville, Bedford County, TN. Several of her children are

buried next to her.

20

NAME: William Burt

FATHER: William Burt

MOTHER: Lucy (MNU)

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1754 ? Mecklenburg County, VA

DIED: 8 July 1823 2 Warren County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Salumith Ballard ca 1780 ? Halifax County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William 11 Nov 1782 Warren County, NC

John A. 1 June 1800 Warren County, NC

Salumith “Sallie”

Lucretia A.

Elizabeth

Ann

Harriet D. ca 1797

NOTES: 1) The Halifax County NC deed book provides the first record of William Burt in

NC in Book 17, p. 442 11 June 1778. This date is more likely to be 1788, as Wm.

Burt does not appear in the 1779 or 1784 Warren County tax lists. He is, however,

listed on the 1790 Warren County census as having 3 white males over age 16,

2 white males under age 16, 3 white females and 20 slaves.

2) Revolutionary War Records Mecklenburg County, Virginia, by Katherine B.

Elliott, 1964 uses as a source, Virginia DAR Register, page 445; gives William’s

death as 8 July 1823, Warren County, NC.

3) William Burt made his will on 10 May 1823, which was presented to the August

1823 Court (Will Book 25, page 178). All of the children listed above were

named in the will. Additional information from his will and other sources:

  • Salumith married Henry Sims on 29 Nov 1813 in Warren County, NC
  • Lucretia married Martin R. Garrett on 25 Jan 1820 in Warren County, NC

4) Salumith Ballard Burt made her will on 23 April 1840, which was proved in 1848.

Her will adds the following information about her children:

  • John A. Burt married Emily M. Cheek on 9 Oct 1830 in Warren County, NC;

died on 27 Mar 1845

  • No marriage is indicated for daughter Elizabeth; died 1852 in Nash County, NC
  • No marriage is indicated for daughter Ann; died after 1852
  • No marriage is indicated for daughter Harriet died 24 Sept 1823 in Warren Cty.
  • Salumith Sims had a daughter named Harriet William Ballard Sims and a son

named Leonard S. Sims

  • Lucretia Garrett had a son named Samuel Brown Garrett

21

NAME: William Burt

FATHER: Richard Burt the Elder

MOTHER: Elizabeth Moody

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1700 – 1702 York County, VA

DIED: ca 1783/1784 Greensville County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Lucy (MNU) ca 1732 VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Mary ca 1735 VA

Lucy ca 1739 VA

Elizabeth ca 1745 VA

Harwood ca 1746 VA

William ca 1750 VA

NOTES: 1) William Burt’s will was recorded in Book 1, pp. 32-33, Greenville County, VA and

was dated 15 Oct 1782. Executors were William Burt and Harwood Burt. The will

was proved on 27 Feb 1783.

2) Mary Burt was named in her father’s will with a married name of Tooke

Elizabeth Burt was named in her father’s will with a married name of Kelbie

Lucy Burt was named in her father’s will with a married name of Haley

Harwood Burt md. Margaret Tenham ca 1761 in VA; died ca 1803, York Cty. VA

22

NAME: Richard Burt (the Elder)

FATHER: ? Richard Burt?

MOTHER: Unknown

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1665 ? VA ?

DIED: 1745 York County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: 1) Elizabeth Hansford ca 1687 VA

2) Elizabeth Moody 2 ca 1695 York County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: By his first wife, Elizabeth Hansford:

Richard Burt (the Younger) ca 1691 VA

By his second wife, Elizabeth Moody:

Moody Burt 3 ca 1696 York County, VA

Josias Burt 3 ca 1698 York County, VA

Martha Burt 3 ca 1700 York County, VA

William Burt 3 ca 1701 York County, VA

Judith Burt 3 ca 1702 York County, VA

Elias Burt 3 ca 1705 York County, VA

NOTES: 1) Richard the Elder’s father may have been named Richard Burt, too. There are

records showing a Richard Burt was living in Charles River County of colonial

VA in 1642 and 1649. This person was in the portion of Charles River County

that later became Gloucester County.

2) Some sources indicate that Richard’s second wife, Elizabeth Moody, was the

daughter of Josias Moody and Elizabeth Folliott; the Folliott family has been

traced to the 16th century in England and show that the family came to Hampton

Parish in the Virginia colony in the mid-17th century.

3) Online records indicate that the children of Richard and Elizabeth Moody Burt

married:

  • Josias Burt married Elizabeth Moody, daughter of Philip Moody and Elizabeth
  • Moody Burt married Elizabeth (MNU)
  • William Burt married Lucy (MNU)
  • Judith married Francis Peters
  • Elias Burt married Anne Finnell
  • Martha Burt — no information available

23

The Jennings Family

Beginning with Margaret Anita Jennings

Wife of Benjamin Franklin Davis, Sr.

[See page 5]

NAME: Margaret Anita Jennings

FATHER: Hasting Jennings

MOTHER: Susannah Newton

DATE PLACE

BORN: 26 Mar 1843 Edgefield District SC

DIED: 23 Oct 1921 Chattanooga TN

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Benjamin Franklin Davis 3 Feb 1876 Wartrace, Bedford Cty, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Frances Eudora “Dora” Oct. 1876 Wartrace, TN

Benjamin Franklin “Frank” 4 July 1878 Wartrace, TN

Gertrude ca 1880 Wartrace TN

Sara Blanche “Blanche” 5 Jan. 1881 Wartrace, TN

NOTES: 1) Margaret Jennings Davis lived in a number of locations during her lifetime. She

was born in the Edgefield District of SC and lived there until she was 8 – 10

years of age. Her father, Hasting Jennings, sold their land in SC and moved his

family to GA during the early 1850s. Her mother, Susannah, died there in 1854.

Her father, Hasting, remarried and it appears the unmarried daughters may not have

gotten along well with his second wife, Nancy Anna (MNU) as the 1860 census

shows both Margaret (age 16) and her older sister, Elizabeth (age 18), living with

their oldest sister, Sarah Jennings Healan and her family in LaFayette, Walker

County, GA. The 1870 census shows her still living in LaFayette, GA, but with

another sister, Martha “Mattie” Jennings Fulmer and her children (Mattie’s husband

died during the Civil War). Margaret was listed in 1870 as teaching school. The

book, Documented Notes on Jennings and Allied Families, by Beatrice Mackey Doughtie,

quotes a letter from a Fulmer descendent, stating that, in 1873, Margaret Jennings

was teaching school in southwest GA and living with one Tillman Jennings (who

would have been her cousin). Some time between 1873 and 1876, Margaret moved

to Wartrace, TN, probably at the same time or shortly after her sister’s family (Sarah

and A.J. Healan) moved there to open a hotel, Healan House. Based on later census

data, Margaret remained in Wartrace nearly forty years before moving to Chattanooga,

where she spent the last seven years of her life with her youngest daughter, Blanche

Davis Howard, and her family.

2) Margaret Jennings Davis was well-educated. She attended Mary Sharp College, in

Winchester, Tennessee, and Louisville Female College, in Louisville, Kentucky.

3) Margaret and Ben Davis were married less than 6 years when he died, leaving her

with 3 very small children. Blanche, the youngest, was only 7 months old at that

time. Although in reduced financial circumstances, Margaret saw that they had the

best education she could provide, and supplemented their education at home.

4) Margaret is interred in Forest Hills Cemetery in Chattanooga, TN, between her

sons-in-law, Frederick Howard and Thompson Allen.

5) See page 5 for notes about the children of Margaret and Ben Davis.

25

NAME: Hasting Jennings

FATHER: William Jennings

MOTHER: Nancy Dove

DATE PLACE

BORN: 25 Jan 1814 Edgefield District, SC

DIED: Apr 1870 Walker County, GA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: 1) Susannah Newton 2 1812 Edgefield District, SC

2) Nancy Ann (MNU) ca 1858 GA

3) Sarah Elizabeth (MNU) ca 1867 GA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: By first wife, Susannah Newton:

Sarah Dove “Sallie” 27 Oct 1833 Edgefield District, SC

Mary A. 18 Jun 1836 Edgefield District, SC

Robert William 19 Mar 1838 Edgefield District, SC

Martha C. “Mattie” 29 Jul 1839 Edgefield District, SC

Elizabeth Newton 10 Jun 1841 Edgefield District, SC

Margaret Anita “Maggie” 26 Mar 1843 Edgefield District, SC

Tyre 16 Sep 1845 Edgefield District, SC

By second wife, Nancy Anna:

Richard Hasting 23 Oct 1858 Walker County, GA

Julia ca 1860 prob. Walker County, GA

John H. ca 1862 prob. Walker County, GA

Emma Jan 1866 prob. Walker County, GA

By third wife, Sarah Elizabeth:

Thomas ca 1868 prob. Walker County, GA

NOTES: 1) Hasting Jennings did not inherit property when his father, William, died.

William’s will states, in part: “The remaining part of my estate to be distributed

among my children in equal division, except my two sons, Tyre and Hasting

Jennings who are to receive $5 and no more on account of their misconduct to me.”

2) One of Hasting’s granddaughters, Bertie Healan Berry, wrote the following in 1918:

“Hasting Jennings [was] a student and a dreamer, the father of a large family and

was never able to maintain the financial status of his youth.”

3) From the Edgefield Advertiser, July 20, 1854: “Died on July 11, 1854, at Roswell,

Cobb County, Georgia, Mrs. Susannah Jennings, wife of Hasting Jennings, in the

43rd year of her age. She was raised, and lived, in Edgefield, S.C., until a few years

back, when with her husband and children moved to Georgia. Being not permanently

settled, she had not moved her membership from the Pleasant Grove

Baptist Church in Edgefield District.”

26

NAME: William Jennings

FATHER: John Jennings

MOTHER: Mary (MNU)

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1771/1772 SC

DIED: ca 1842 Edgefield District, SC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: 1) Nancy Dove ca 1793 Edgefield District, SC

2) Mrs. Eleanor Etheredge Richardson ca 1827 Edgefield District, SC

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: By first wife, Nancy Dove:

Tyre 16 Sep 1794 SC

Lucy 1795 SC

John B. 4 Feb 1797 SC

Nancy 1800 SC

Elizabeth 3 Nov 1802 SC

Mary 1804 Edgefield District, SC

Susannah 1807 Edgefield District, SC

Martha 1809 Edgefield District, SC

Hasting 29 Jan 1814 Edgefield District, SC

Letitia “Let” 1816 Edgefield District, SC

By second wife, Eleanor Etheredge Richardson:

Lott 31 Aug 1828 SC

Rachel 1830 SC

Eleanor “Ellen” 1832 SC

Frances “Fannie” 16 Nov 1834 SC

William 1836 SC

Philip 19 Feb 1846

NOTES: 1) William Jennings was a planter and, by all accounts, a man of wealth. He died at

home in the Edgefield District of SC.

2) A complete listing is available of the spouses and children of William’s children,

but it is not included here; see Documented Notes on Jennings and Allied Families, by

Beatrice Mackey Doughtie; 1961.

27

NAME: John Jennings, Sr.

FATHER: Unknown

MOTHER: Unknown

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1740-1745 probably SC

DIED: ca 1819 Edgefield District, SC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Mary (MNU)

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: James ca 1765-1770 probably SC

Lucy ca 1765-1770 probably SC

John, Jr. ca 1765-1770 probably SC

William ca 1771-1772 probably SC

Philip ca 1775-1780 probably SC

Jesse ca 1782 probably SC

Mary 1780-1790 probably SC

NOTES: 1) There are records showing that a John Jennings received a land grant from King

George III about 1770. Family names such as Tyre and Hasting are recorded with

this John Jennings, so it is likely this record is about “our” John Jennings. John

Jennings, Sr., bought land in Fairfield County, SC in1785. At that time, he

was living in Chester County, SC. He was listed in the 1790 census as living in the

Camden District, Fairfield County, SC. The 1800 census indicated he was living

in the Fairfield District. In 1804, he and wife, Mary, were living in Edgefield

District, SC, according to land records of the county.

2) John Jennings, Sr., died before 15 April 1820, for on that day, William Jennings

sold land on Dailey’s Creek, a branch of the Little Saluda River, to his brother,

Jesse. This land had belonged to their father, John Jennings, dec’d., and had been

bought by William at his father’s estate sale. In this deed, John Jennings was

referred to as John Jennings, Sr. On 2 February, 1828, Jesse and James Jennings,

executors of the estate of John Jennings, dec’d., conveyed 52 acres of land on the

north side of Beaver Dam Creek to William Jennings. Use of the term, executors,

would indicate that John Jennings, Sr., died testate but, to date, no will has been

found.

3) John Jennings, Sr. had seven known children, those listed above, who were identified

in the Philip Jennings estate file. (Apt. 60, Pkg. 2475, Edgefield County, SC)

Philip Jenning died in Edgefield District, SC, on 30 May 1848. He died intestate

and without issue. His estate was divided between his widow, Lucy Jennings, his

brother, Jesse Jennings, and the children of his deceased siblings. John Jennings,

Sr., may have had other children but no record of them has been found. If they

existed, either they died young or died prior to 1848 and without issue.

4) John Jennings has been identified as a Revolutionary patriot of SC, based on militia

duty with a Col. Anderson; SC Archives, Accts. Aud. #4027, Roll #48.79, Indent

442T; and Andrews, SC Revolutionary War Indents: A Schedule, page 33.

28

The Marriott Family

Beginning with Mary Marriott

Wife of Henry Davis

[See page 9]

NAME: Mary Marriott

FATHER: William Marriott

MOTHER: Sarah Collier

DATE PLACE

BORN: Surry County, VA

DIED:

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Henry Davis 1 bef 1725 2 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William Surry County, VA

Ann Surry County, VA

Hannah Surry County, VA

Benjamin Surry County, VA

Isham Surry County, VA

Randolph Surry County, VA

Henry Surry County, VA

Kezia Surry County, VA

Marriott Surry County, VA

Silvia Surry County, VA

James Surry County, VA

NOTES: 1) Virginia Historical Genealogies, by John Bennett Boddie, includes a chapter on this

Davis family, beginning on pg. 255, and on the Warren family, beginning on pg.

244.

2) The will of Thomas Collier, Sarah Collier Marriott’s father, dated 15 February 1728,

mentions “my daughter Sarah Marriott, wife of William Marriott… my grand

daughter, Mary Marriott…my grandsons William and Thomas Marriott…”

3) Mary Marriott was the daughter of William Marriott and his wife, Sarah Collier

William Marriott was the son of Matthias Marriot and his wife, Alice, daughter of

Thomas Warren. One of Alice’s half brothers, Thomas Warren, Jr., was the father of

Elizabeth Warren, who married James Davis, Sr., and, therefore, was Henry Davis’

mother.

All children listed above were named in the will. There may have been other

children who died unmarried and before their parents.

30

NAME: William Marriott

FATHER: Mathias Marriott

MOTHER: Alice Warren

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca. 1688 1 Surry County, VA

DIED: bef. 20 January 1767 2

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Sarah Collier bef. Nov. 1725 3

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Mary 4 Surry County, VA

William 4 Surry County, VA

Thomas 4 Surry County, VA

Mathias 4 Surry County, VA

Benjamin 4 Surry County, VA

John 4 Surry County, VA

NOTES: 1) William Marriott was the only son of Matthias Marriott. When his father’s will was

written in 1707, he appeared to be a minor; in 1710, he proved a legal document

under oath, so must have been of legal age at that time.

2) William Marriott’s will was dated 20 September 1765 and proved 20 January 1767.

3) Sarah and William Marriott signed a deed together on that date, so they must have

married earlier.

4) All children listed were named in William Marriott’s will. His wife, Sarah, was not

mentioned in the will, so it is assumed she died earlier.

31

NAME: Mathias Marriott

FATHER: Unknown

MOTHER: Unknown

DATE PLACE

BORN:

DIED: bef. 2 September 1707 1

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Alice Warren 2 bef Sept 1670 3

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William

Margaret 4

Elizabeth 4

Marion 4

NOTES: 1) Matthias Marriott’s will was dated 12 June 1707 and probated 2 September 1707.

Matthias Marriott and Alice Warren Marriot are included in the chapter on the

Warren family in Virginia Historical Genealogies, by John Bennett Boddie, beginning

on pg. 244.

2) One of Alice’s half brothers, Thomas Warren, Jr., was the father of

Elizabeth Warren, who married James Davis, Sr.; Alice and Mathias Marriott’s

granddaughter, Mary Marriott, married James Davis, Sr.’s son, Henry Davis.

3) On 24 September, 1670, an agreement was signed, settling a property dispute

between Jane Warren, Alice Warren Marriott’s stepmother, and her husband,

Mathias Marriott.

4) Margaret Marriott married Mr. Flake.

Elizabeth Marriott married Mr. Hill.

Marion Marriott married Mr. Chips

All children listed above were named in the will. There may have been other

children who died unmarried and before their parents.

32

The Powell Family

Beginning with Charlotte Powell

Wife of John Sims

[See page 42]

NAME: Charlotte Powell

FATHER: Dempsey Powell

MOTHER: Nancy [surname is believed to be Dempsey; unverified]

DATE PLACE

BORN: 29 July 1774 Wake Co., NC

DIED: 1828 Bedford County, TN

(or 7 October 1837?) (or Rutherford Co., TN?)

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: John Sims 30 Dec 1793 Wake County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Nancy Powell 18 Nov 1794 Wake County (?), MC

Leonard Powell 31 May 1797 Granville County, NC

Pleasant Benton 17 Feb 1799

John Swepson 20 Mar 1801

Richard Henry 1 Mar 1803 NC

James Lewis 11 Aug 1805

Sarah 12 Jun 1811

NOTES: 1) From the family Bible of Louisa Batey Sims and Leonard Henley Sims (son of

Swepson Sims; grandson of Leonard Henley Sims and Sarah Swepson):

“Leonard Sims, my grandfather, was born July 2nd, 1739, and died in 1804.

Sarah Swepson Sims, my grandmother, was born October 27th, 1752, and

died June 14, 1811. My uncle, John Sims, was born 1773, and died 1841.

Charlotte Sims, his wife, was born July 29th, 1774, and died October 7th,

  1. I remember the last two with great fondness, having no recollection

of my Grandfather and Mother. Signed: L.H. Sims”

This information was provided by George Ann Sims in May, 1999.

2) Nancy Powell Sims married Henry Davis; see page 7.

3) See page 42 for notes about the children of Charlotte Powell and John Sims

34

NAME: Dempsey Powell

FATHER: Nathaniel Powell

MOTHER: Elizabeth (MNU)

DATE PLACE

BORN: 2 sources: ca 1730 and ca 1740 Wake County, NC

DIED: 2 sources: 1793 and 15 Oct 1808 Wake County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: 1) Nancy (MNU); probably Dempsey ca 1765

2) Pleasant Benton

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN:

By his first wife, Nancy:

Elizabeth ca 1769 NC

Chloe ca 1770 NC

Charlotte 7 July 1774 Wake County, NC

By his second wife, Pleasant Benton:

Caswell

Jesse

Patsy ca 1780

Mildred 1785 Wake County, NC

Benton

Dempsey 29 Mar 1802 NC

NOTES: 1) Dempsey Powell is listed in the DAR Patriot Index as follows:

  1. ca. 1730 NC; d. 1793 NC; m . 1) Nancy MNU 2) Pleasant MNU;

Private and Patriotic Service NC

2) The Powell Families of Virginia and the South, compiled by S. E. Lucas, lisrs Thomas

Powell as the immigrant ancestor. He is said to have come to North America before

  1. His children, as listed, were William Powell, born ca 1607 and Nathaniel

Powell, Sr.. Nathaniel was born ca 1610 in Isle of Wight County, VA, and died

ca 1678; he married Lucretia (MNU). Their son was Nathaniel Powell, Jr., who was

born ca 1650 in Isle of Wight County, VA, and married Mary (MNU); and their son

was Nathaniel Powell III, who was Dempsey Powell’s father. Nathaniel III was born

in Isle of Wight County, VA, and married Elizabeth (MNU). Their known children

were Jordan, William, Shadrack, Dempsey, Nathan, Sarah, Patsy, Jesse and Willis.

4) Mildred, born 1785, died 1845, married John Streeter. She came to Bedford County,

TN, with her children and settled on her division, which was located south of

Warner’s Bridge. Her son, John, married Susan Burt; her daughter, Cassie, married

Henry Shapard (their daughter was Cassie Streeter Shapard).

3) Elizabeth married Robert Temple of Wake County., NC. They came to Bedford

County and settled on her division of 201 acres which lay south of Sims Rd. near

Powell Creek School. In 1817, she sold this tract to John Sim

 

 

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The Battle of Britain – Full Length Documentary

Battle of Britain is a 1969 British Second World War film directed by Guy Hamilton, and produced by Harry Saltzman and S. Benjamin Fisz. The film broadly relates the events of the Battle of Britain. The script by James Kennaway and Wilfred Greatorex was based on the book The Narrow Marginby Derek Wood and Derek Dempster.

The film endeavoured to be an accurate account of the Battle of Britain, when in the summer and autumn of 1940 the British RAF inflicted a strategic defeat on the Luftwaffe and so ensured the cancellation of Operation Sea LionAdolf Hitler‘s plan to invade Britain. The film is notable for its spectacular flying sequences, in contrast with the unsatisfactory model work seen in Angels One Five (1952) and on a far grander scale than had been seen on film before; these made the film’s production very expensive.

 

 

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Today’s Video: Richard Gere and Oren Moverman Discuss Homelessness

stdnts

 

 

Today’s Video: Richard Gere and Oren Moverman Discuss Homelessness

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Homeless Along San Diego River Warned Of El Niño

67363-prism6

 

 

Homeless Along San Diego River Warned Of El Niño

Outreach team tells people living along the 52-mile river of flood dangers

Aired 10/28/15 on KPBS News.

An estimated 500 homeless people live along the flood-prone 52-mile river. Outreach teams have been scouring the riverbanks to alert the homeless to the dangers that will come with predicted heavy rains.

Navigating El Niño

Special Feature Navigating El Niño

Homeless advocates are scrambling to help unsheltered men, women and children ahead of El Niño — especially those living along the flood-prone San Diego River.

“Hello? Anybody home?” called out Brandon Smith, outreach supervisor with the nonprofitAlpha Project.

Smith and his team recently scoured the riverbanks along Qualcomm Stadium in Mission Valley for people in need.

“We’re from Alpha Project,” he shouted downstream.

Tucked behind thick vegetation along the slow trickling stream were dozens of tents and makeshift dwellings. Trash and soiled clothes outlined the public land that the destitute have claimed as their own.

“How are you doing, sir?” Smith asked a man who peered out of his tent. “All right,” he answered. “Good,” Smith replied. “Just coming by to see if you need any food, snacks or assistance.”

The river-dwellers seemed wary of visitors. Smith said some are alcoholics or mentally ill. Others prefer the solitary lifestyle. A few see the river as a place to live while they recover after losing a job.

Alpha Project workers offer assistance to a homeless woman near the San Diego River in Mission Valley, Oct. 15, 2015.

Alpha Project workers offer assistance to a homeless woman near the San Diego River in Mission Valley, Oct. 15, 2015.

Smith estimates 500 people live along the 52-mile river, which after four years of drought appears in some sections as more of a long, stagnant puddle. But history shows when heavy rains fall, the river can quickly transform into an overflowing raging torrent, washing away everything in its path.

“We always stress that river rescues are the most dangerous,” said Lt. John Sandmeyer, leader of the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department’s River Rescue Team. “We’re very used to dealing with ocean currents and we’re very comfortable in the ocean. But when you’re in the river, it’s just moving all the time — same direction. There’s no let up.”

Sandmeyer recently voiced his concerns to county leaders and emergency officials. He said his team is working diligently to train other emergency crews for flood rescues.

“We do feel if we get a few days in a row of rain and then repeat it week to week this winter, it’s going to really stress the system and our network of responders,” Sandmeyer said.

That’s why along the river Smith was warning homeless people of the potential risk from El Niño.

After four years of drought, some sections of the San Diego River, including this portion near Mission Valley, appear as more of a long, stagnant puddle, Oct. 15, 2015.

After four years of drought, some sections of the San Diego River, including this portion near Mission Valley, appear as more of a long, stagnant puddle, Oct. 15, 2015.

“The El Niño season’s coming up so there’s going to be a lot of bad rain,” Smith told a homeless man, whose encampment was set up near the water’s edge. “We want to make sure everyone’s notified in the riverbed so we don’t have any casualties.”

The team offered housing referrals to those they encountered, though options are slim, Smith said. The encampments are evidence of San Diego’s limited shelter space, he added.

A homeless count taken in January found more than 8,700 homeless people in San Diego County. Nearly 4,500 were in shelters, while another 4,000 were living outdoors — a 4.3 increase from last year. The unsheltered included 131 children under the age of 18.

“If the inn is full, then we do turn people away. We try to get to them as quickly as we can and we also assess their vulnerability out there,” said Deacon Jim Vargas, president and CEO of Father Joe’s Villages.

The nonprofit organization shelters 1,500 people each night, including 350 beds that replaced the two winter tents that the city used to set up annually.

Vargas said he’s noticed the population boom in the homeless.

“We’re seeing it in our lines, in those who come to us,” he said. “We’re seeing (it) in those who have to wait longer as a result.”

Vargas said he’s concerned about the El Niño forecast and is working with other faith communities to secure more emergency beds for the homeless.

“We’re trying to all band together in order to add up those numbers,” he said.

Vargas opens his two dining halls during cold winter storms to accommodate 200 additional people.

Despite his efforts and those by other groups that help the homeless, hundreds will likely have to endure potentially treacherous conditions on the streets.

“Heat, cold weather, wet, rain, wind — it’s very hard out here,” said Terrance Livingston, who was homeless for three years after he and his wife became buried in medical billsfrom her cancer treatment.

Terrance Livingston and his wife, Pamela Cooks, stand in a lunch line at St. Vincent de Paul Villages in downtown San Diego, Oct. 5, 05.

Terrance Livingston and his wife, Pamela Cooks, stand in a lunch line at St. Vincent de Paul Villages in downtown San Diego, Oct. 5, 05.

The couple now lives at St. Vincent de Paul Village shelter. Livingston said he’s worried about those who aren’t so lucky.

“You’re going to be wet constantly,” he said. “There’s a lot of people that are going to be sick, from either a cold, pneumonia — especially the elderly that’s out here.”

Smith said his Alpha Project team plans to work around the clock this winter, as they do every year, to keep people safe.

“We provide blankets, socks, plastic ponchos … tarps, so that they can have some sort of covering,” he said.

Forecasters expect El Niño’s wet weather to hit the San Diego region as early as next month.

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Vigil pays homage to homeless lives lost

Mugshot of Lyndsay Winkley

http://www.lyndsay.winkley@sduniontribune.com

 

 

— Crowding the steps that lead to the San Diego County Administration Building on Sunday were 91 empty pairs of shoes, each one representing a man or woman who died on the streets of San Diego over the last year.

The heart-wrenching display came at the end of an annual, silent, mile-long walk to commemorate the homeless who died and to bring awareness to the plight of nearly 9,000 people still without homes in the city. Those 91 deaths, which happened between Oct. 1, 2014 and Sept. 30, represented a 61 percent jump from the 56 who died the previous year.

More than 100 people, most carrying a pair of shoes, marched from the San Diego Rescue Mission, which hosted the event, to the county building on Harbor Drive. Once there, they read the names of those who died. The demonstration was meant to be a wake-up call, said Herb Johnson, the rescue’s president.

“These are our brothers, these are our sisters, these are people that were somebody’s child… and we as a community have a responsibility to provide support, as much support as we can, so that we can get as many of these people off the streets as we can,” he said.

It was also meant to be a time of reflection for those who are working to get off the streets, Johnson said. Many who toted shoes were residents at the rescue mission, he said.

“Most of the people who carry those shoes will tell you they start to get really heavy, because what they start to understand is those shoes could very well have been theirs,” Johnson said.

Even though Elizabeth Mathews has been off the streets and drug-free since 2011, hearing the names of the dead and seeing each pair of shoes “hits me in the heart,” she said.

Mathews, who now works at the rescue mission, shared her story at Sunday’s event. She was 22 years old, a mother of two, when she got hooked on crystal methamphetamine. It took years, but she ended up on the streets.

The now 54-year-old would spend much of her time at the El CajonTransit Center and most nights at the Viejas Casino. Other times, though, she’d sleep in the bushes with a blanket that staved off the cold, but not the bugs.

“That’s no life,” Mathews said. “Talking about it now makes me want to cry, but I know I’m better than that old Elizabeth.”

Then, in 2011, her brother found her “methed out” at the trolley station, she said. He told her that their mother had died 15 days earlier. It was a turning point for Mathews.

She attended the funeral and checked into a rehabilitation center a week later. After that program, she moved to the San Diego Rescue Mission to continue her recovery.

Slowly, with help from programs at the mission, she started piecing her life back together. She mended ties with her children, and got a job at the rescue. Now she helps others get off the street

“I love what I do because I’m constantly giving back by sharing my hopes, dreams and story to the new ladies who come into the program,” Mathews said. “I just hope I can plant a seed here and there. If you plant even one seed, it might grow and they can pass that on.”

lyndsay.winkley@sduniontribune.com

http://tap2-cdn.rubiconproject.com/partner/scripts/rubicon/emily.html?rtb_ext=1&pc=7476/68756&geo=na&co=us

 

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VETERANS TO NEVER BE HOMELESS UNDER PRESIDENT TRUMP

coat and tie

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION REFORMS THAT WILL MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN

The Goals Of Donald J. Trump’s Veterans Plan

The current state of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is absolutely unacceptable. Over 300,000 veterans died waiting for care. Corruption and incompetence were excused. Politicians in Washington have done too little too slowly to fix it. This situation can never happen again, and when Donald J. Trump is president, it will be fixed – fast.

The guiding principle of the Trump plan is ensuring veterans have convenient access to the best quality care. To further this principle, the Trump plan will decrease wait times, improve healthcare outcomes, and facilitate a seamless transition from service into civilian life.

The Trump Plan Will:

  1. Ensure our veterans get the care they need wherever and whenever they need it. No more long drives. No more waiting for backlogs. No more excessive red tape. Just the care and support they earned with their service to our country.
  2. Support the whole veteran, not just their physical health care, but also by addressing their invisible wounds, investing in our service members’ post-active duty success, transforming the VA to meet the needs of 21st century service members, and better meeting the needs of our female veterans.
  3. Make the VA great again by firing the corrupt and incompetent VA executives who let our veterans down, by modernizing the VA, and by empowering the doctors and nurses to ensure our veterans receive the best care available in a timely manner.

The Trump Plan Gives Veterans The Freedom To Choose And Forces The VA To Compete For Their Dollars

Politicians in Washington have tried to fix the VA by holding hearings and blindly throwing money at the problem. None of it has worked. In fact, wait times were 50% higher this summer than they were a year ago. That’s because the VA lacks the right leadership and management. It’s time we stop trusting Washington politicians to fix the problems and empower our veterans to vote with their feet.

Under a Trump Administration, all veterans eligible for VA health care can bring their veteran’s ID card to any doctor or care facility that accepts Medicare to get the care they need immediately. Our veterans have earned the freedom to choose better or more convenient care from the doctor and facility of their choice. The power to choose will stop the wait time backlogs and force the VA to improve and compete if the department wants to keep receiving veterans’ healthcare dollars. The VA will become more responsive to veterans, develop more efficient systems, and improve the quality of care because it will have no other choice.

The Trump Plan Treats The Whole Veteran

We must care for the whole veteran, not just their physical health. We must recognize that today’s veterans have very different needs than those of the Greatest Generation.

The Trump Plan Will:

  1. Increase funding for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury and suicide prevention services to address our veterans’ invisible wounds. Service members are five times more likely to develop depression than civilians. They are almost fifteen times more likely to develop PTSD than civilians. This funding will help provide more and better counseling and care. More funding will also support research on best practices and state of the art treatments to keep our veterans alive, healthy and whole. With these steps, the Trump plan will help the veteran community put the unnecessary stigma surrounding mental health behind them and instead encourage acceptance and treatment in our greater society.
  2. Increase funding for job training and placement services (including incentives for companies hiring veterans), educational support and business loans. All Americans agree that we must do everything we can to help put our service men and women on a path to success as they leave active duty by collaborating with the many successful non-profit organizations that are already helping. Service members have learned valuable skills in the military but many need help understanding how to apply those skills in civilian life. Others know how to apply those skills but need help connecting with good jobs to support their families. Still others have an entrepreneurial spirit and are ready to start creating jobs and growing the economy. The Trump plan will strengthen existing programs or replace them with more effective ones to address these needs and to get our veterans working.
  3. Transform the VA to meet the needs of 21st century service members.Today’s veterans have very different needs than those of the generations that came before them. The VA must adapt to meet the needs of this generation of younger, more diverse veterans. The Trump plan will expand VA services for female veterans and ensure the VA is providing the right support for this new generation of veterans.
  4. Better support our women veterans. The fact that many VA hospitals don’t permanently staff OBGYN doctors shows an utter lack of respect for the growing number female veterans. Under the Trump plan, every VA hospital in the country will be fully equipped with OBGYN and other women’s health services. In addition, women veterans can always choose a different OBGYN in their community using their veteran’s ID card.

The Trump Plan Will Make The VA Great Again

The VA health care program is a disaster. Some candidates want to get rid of it, but our veterans need the VA to be there for them and their families. That’s why the Trump plan will:

  1. Fire the corrupt and incompetent VA executives that let our veterans down.Under a Trump Administration, there will be no job security for VA executives that enabled or overlooked corruption and incompetence. They’re fired. New leadership will focus the VA staff on delivering timely, top quality care and other services to our nation’s veterans. Under a Trump Administration, exposing and addressing the VA’s inefficiencies and shortcomings will be rewarded, not punished.
  2. End waste, fraud and abuse at the VA. The Trump plan will ensure the VA is spending its dollars wisely to provide the greatest impact for veterans and hold administrators accountable for irresponsible spending and abuse. The days of $6.3 million for statues and fountains at VA facilities and $300,000 for a manager to move 140 miles are over. The Trump plan will clean up the VA’s finances so the current VA budget provides more and better care than it does now.
  3. Modernize the VA. A VA with 20th century technology cannot serve 21stcentury service members and their needs. The VA has been promising to modernize for years without real results. The Trump plan will make it happen by accelerating and expanding investments in state of the art technology to deliver best-in-class care quickly and effectively. All veterans should be able to conveniently schedule appointments, communicate with their doctors, and view accurate wait times with the push of a button.
  4. Empower the caregivers to ensure our veterans receive quality care quickly.Caregivers should be able to easily streamline treatment plans across departments and utilize telehealth tools to better serve their patients. As we have seen from the private sector, the potential for new, innovative technology is endless. Abandoning the wasteful and archaic mindset of the public sector will give way to tremendously effective veteran healthcare.
  5. Hire more veterans to care for veterans. The more veterans we have working at the VA, the better the VA will be. They understand the unique challenges facing their community. To increase the number of veterans hired by the VA, this plan will add an additional 5 points to the qualifying scores of veterans applying for VA jobs.
  6. Embed satellite VA clinics in rural and other underserved areas. The Trump Administration will embed satellite VA clinics within hospitals and other care facilities in rural and other underserved areas. This step will ensure veterans have easy access to care and local hospitals and care facilities can handle the influx of patients without backlogs while tapping the specialized knowledge of VA health specialists.
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LEARNING ENGLISH IS FUN

yes i am

  eslschoolforenglish.wordpress.com

http://eslschoolforenglish.wordpress.com

Learn english with alvin (all)

image 1

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https://youtu.be/CeAma4pjjCc?t=18
www.alvindavis99.wordpress.com
Alvin Lester Davis
1555 MLK Fayetteville ARK 72701
949-278-6549 / alvindavis99@gmail.com
Driving Lic: 935715029 Arkansas Expire: July 15, 2019
Stationary Engineer/English Teacher
Summary of Experience
· Supervising mechanics on Central Plant equipment and Boiler Rooms for Industrial Plant, Hospitals and Airports.
· In excess of 15 years with civilian and mechanical engineering equipment concerned with the maintenance and repairs of wide range of equipment in boiler rooms operation and maintenance such as four (4) units of oil fired high temperature water boilers with a capacity of 45,000,000 BTU/hr. per unit and four (4) Centrifugal Refrigeration Units with a capacity of 5000 tons per unit, Water and Waste Treatment Plants, Utilities Supports, and D.I. system for a Pharmaceutical Company.
CIP School in Angeles City www.cipschool.com
January 2009 to October 2014
Teacher
· Teaching Korean and Japanese student all English subjects
· As of May 2011 took over as Head Teacher of 58 Teachers and 80 Students
Shane English School –Dongying, China
January 2008 to September 2009
English Teacher
· Taught 5yr to 15yr old Chinese children with a class size of 8 to 32 equaling 200 students a week.
· Taught Basic English to advanced English in a night class of 20yr to 40yr people
· Skill’s Interviews, passing SAT for enrollment for the USA
Novartis– Emeryville, CA
Novartis Vaccines & Diagnostics, Inc.
4560 Horton Street
Emeryville, CA.94608-2916
(800) 524-4766
2006 to 2008
Master Mechanic
· Served as Master Mechanic for 22 Buildings with Pharm Equipment, such as: Boilers, Chillers, Sterilizers and performed P.M’s Corrective Maintenance.
VERIZON DATA BASE –Sacramento, CA
2005-2006
3635 N Freeway Blvd, Spc 100
Sacramento, CA 95834
(916) 419-6200
H.V.A.C. TECH / SUPERVISOR
· Responsibilities included: Chillers, Boilers, H.V.A.C. System in the Building. P.M.’s Corrective Maintenance On all Building System’s, including but not limited to VAV, Air-Handlers, Cooling Towers, Helping the Electricians on there Craft as well.
COMPUTER SCIENCES CORP –(EUSA CH-47 FLIGHT SIMULATOR UNIT 15367 APO) / South Korea, AP
Boeing / L3 703-876-1000 3170 Fairview Park DrFalls Church, VA 22042-4516
2002 to 2005
Stationary Engineer / HVAC Engineer
· Repair of Chillers, Boilers, working with Building Control Systems.
· Teaching English and Engineering A.C.T. to 20,166 Collage Students
· Supervising HVAC tech’s for all Army Bases in South Korea
Yamas Controls
1 S Linden Avenue
South San Francisco, CA 94080 Phone:
2001 to 2002
Chiller Specialist
· Working with Company’s such as Genentech, Highland Hospital, Our Lady of Holy Angels.
· Responsibilities: Repair of Chillers, Boilers, Air-Handling Units, Controls
· Equipment: Trane, Clever-Brooks, Westinghouse, Carrier, Copeland.
· Left Company to go overseas.
Saudi Oger Ltd — Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
1996 to 2001
HEAD OFFICE
P. O. Box 1449
Riyadh 11431 Saudi Arabia
Tel. No. : (966-11) 4773115
Fax No. : (966-11) 477-0079
Supervisor/H&C Maintenance
· King Khalid International Airport Project
· Utilities Division, Heating & Cooling Section
· Supervising Maintenance personnel of Central Plant Heating & Cooling Section composed of Foremen, Lead Mechanics, Mechanics, HVAC Personnel, I&C Technicians, and Plant Electricians.
· Responsibilities: include plant machinery’s e.g. four (4) Centrifugal Refrigeration Units, each with a capacity of producing 5000 tons per hour of chilled water, four (4) diesel fuel oil fired high temperature water boilers, each with a capacity of producing 45,000,000 BTU per hour with an output temperature of 204OC, six (6) cooling towers and fans, CHW & HTW piping equaling a total length of 12.8 Kilometers. In addition, submitting daily, weekly and monthly reports to the Superintendent and Project Manager.
· Maintenance Duty Officer: On many occasions assumed the duties and responsibilities for all contractual decisions and work co-ordinations at the KKIA Airport during night shifts and weekends.
Boot’s Pharmaceutical Co. –Shreveport, LA
1993 to 1996
3188618200
8800 Ellerbe Shreveport, LA71101
Chief Stationary Engineer of Central Plant
· Responsibilities: included (4) 1000 tons Trane Centrifugal Units, (4) 250 PSI water tube steam Ryans D.I. Water system, 4 Culligan water softeners. Also responsibilities submit time sheets, scheduling of shifts, man-hour reports, monthly reports, weekly reports, chemical reports. Compressors, Super Cooled Systems, Automatic Controls for Boilers & Chillers, Barbare / Colman, Blue Prints, P.I.D. Fiber Optic Systems. February 1996 went to Saudi Arabia (company was sold to B.A.S.F)
http://tokyo.craigslist.jp/edu/5268656577.html

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HOGS, PIGS. OR SWINE, WHAT IS CORRECT!!!!

 

What is a group of pigs called?

Pigs also are called hogs or swine. A male pig of any age is called a boar; female pigs are sows. A baby pig is called a piglet.

Pigs are very social; they form close ties to one another and are comforted by the close proximity of other pigs. They are extremely intelligent and gregarious, communicating with each other constantly through a complex vocabulary of oinks, grunts and squeals. Most pigs are peaceful and rarely show aggression unless they perceive a threat. Contrary to their reputation, pigs are very clean. Even very young pigs relieve themselves in an area far away from where they lie down and sleep.

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English collective nouns

 

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NOUNS WITH PHOTO’S

A
Assembly of God
B
bare-metal
bloodthirsts
C
clave
climate denialists
coextracts
comarcas
conjunctive modes
corporate taxes
crown colonies
CSEs
cuatros
D
degree places
DLLs
double-take
E
ejidos
F
frontal planes
H
ha
hamantasch
hamantash
hamentasch
hamentash
J
jews
K
Kiwis
L
lamens
M
midlife crises
minutiae
P
plumtrees
poltergeister
Postmasters General
Q
QVTs
R
representational state transfers
RTMs
S
sayonaras
scenarii
software development lifecycles
software development processes
software life cycles
software lifecycles
still lives
subjunctive modes
sumos
W
webhooks
wind-break

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The Davis Family Story

Copy of stdnts

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The Davis Family Story

I transcribed the following from documents given to me by Great Aunt Georgia. The documents were copies of a copy of her handwritten account of the family history and of her research. Some county names and/or people names may be misspelled due to lack of clarity in the documents I worked with so any suggested corrections are weclomed. I know its a long article but you’ll find a lot of good information I’m sure.

A little History of the Davis name and Wales

David/Davis/Davies: was the patron saint of Wales, and the name was popular throughout early Britaina. As a result, there a many surnames derived from the given name David, including Davis, and Davies as the Welsh equivalent.

Wales- the land of the legendary King Arthur and Camelot. The land of Sir Lancelot, of castles and fair princesses. The land which has inspired poets and writers to greatness. It was in Whales that Lewis Carroll began his classic “Alice in Wonderland” and it was of this land and people that inspired the warm story “How Green Was My Valley”. Wales is a land of mountains and valleys. On its barren hillside and in her secluded valleys a brave and hardy race has lived since a day earlier than the history of man is recorded.

History records that man first appeared in Wales somewhere between 12,000 to 8000 BC. Evidence to this effect has been found in the limestone cliffs of Cadry Island and Gover, and near Ross in King Arthur’s Cave. The Welsh have always been tenacious in the face of difficulty, thrifty, sturdy, and industrious. They have a quick wit, adaptability, love of religion, fighting and singing. There has always been present in the Welsh’s hearts a strong love of their country. These traits have been born of the numerous struggles they have endured for thousands of years and against numerous adversaries who have tried to conquer them. For ages the Welsh have resisted these successive attempts to invade their country and subject the inhabitants and event today, although for seven centuries a principality of the British Empire, the still cling to their native tongue and customs in many localities. Even the might of the Roman Empire was futile in its efforts to conquer this little country, although the Romans dominated the rest of Great Britain for over four hundred years.

During the periods of Roman domination, Wales remained a haven of refuge to the natives and their Celtic kinsmen who fled their from other parts of the Island. After the Romans abandoned the Island in 408 AD, England was overrun with savage Picts and Scotts from the North, but again Wales was impregnable. Then came barbaric tribes from Continental Europe-the Jute’s, Angles and Saxons, and although these fierce warriors subdued Britain, the were unable to pierce the dogged little country to the west. Even though under the intimate influence of England, the Welsh have in many respects preserved their mother tongue and customs event to the present day.

The race is very fond of music and poetry and the language is peculiarly adapted to poetic harmony and rhythm . Today there are more than 100 stone castles still standing, some in decay but other almost all intact as they were more that one thousand years ago. A few of them are still inhabited. The story book of the Wales abound everywhere throughout its valleys with winding streams and over its snow capped mountains, the legendary and real reach out together to the present. They tell of a proud land and a proud people. They tell that Wales is an exceptional place to grow men.

Davis History

In the early 1800’s, John M. Davis 1777-1851, his father, and his grandfather came by ship from Wales and settled in Virginia. Some say Culpepper county while other say Louisa county. His great grandfather was C. M. Davis was born and died in Wales. John M. Davis’ father and grandfather died and are buried in Virginia. When John M Davis and his people lived in Wales they spoke Welch, but after coming to America the learned to speak the English language.

John M. Davis married Susannah ___?____ born in 1777 or 1778. They lived in Abington Virginia in Washington county. While living there they owned a large plantation. This was before the civil war when people were allowed to purchase slaves. John M. Davis owned many slaves.

In 1818, John M. Davis and Susannah migrated by covered wagon to Tennessee. They traveled as far as Popular Creek in Anderson County and because the territory was so thickly populated with Indians they lived there for awhile. They later lived in the Coves, a northwestern part of Oliver Springs Tennessee in Roane County. They later moved to Nemo, in Morgan County Tennessee.

John M. Davis and Susannah had eight children, 8 sons and 3 daughters. 1. Joseph Davis born 1800, married Amanda Williams- children: Rueben born 1833(Colonel in Civil War-11th Team Calvary, his uncles John R and U.C. served under him), married Lucinda Summers

  1. John L. Davis, (Enlisted in the Union Army-Civil War, discharged at 53 for physical reasons)1810-1890, married Martha Stonecypher 1825-1902. Children: Anna 1842, married an Englishman; Mary, 1843-1893, married John C. Jackson; Savannah 1845; Eliza 1846; Malinda 1847, married E. Phillips; Noah 1848-1902, married a Cromwell, then a Hall, then a Bingham
  2. Hugh R. Davis, 1813-1859, married Charlotte Goddard (raised her family alone, listed in census as farm manger)- children: Elizabeth 1843, blind John M. 1845; William 1848-1912, married a Schooler. One of his children was Henry who married Tilda Liles

Most of the Davis family who lived in Coalfield lived in the Fairview Community. William Carr and Rebecca lived on the road in Coalfield leading to the school house off what is now Highway 62. The Davis Cemetery is located off Highway 62 and was named such because the Davis’ were the first people to be buried there. John M. Davis, 1777-1851 was the first to be buried there. John M. Davis and Mary (Butler) Davis and some of their children are buried in their family Cemetery located on their property which is now the Mabel Wilson property at Fairview, Coalfield Tennessee.

The early Davis’ were of the Baptist faith. Charlotte Davis, Elizabeth Davis, Susannah Davis, Martha Davis (Georgia’s Great Grandmother) Thomas Davis, Mary (Davis) Jackson (Georgia’s Grandmother), Susan Davis, and Anne Davis were on the list of twenty four members who were dismissed from the Liberty Baptist Church, Morgan County, to organize Pleasant Grove Baptist Church. The date of their dismission was dated 27 Aug 1866. The church was constituted 13 October 1866.

Mrs. Charlotte (Lattie) Goddard, who was born May 6, 1864 was a half sister to Professor John L. Davis told about life in Coalfield turning the last half of the eighteenth century. She was then 100 years old, and lived to be older, but her mind was bright. She said she remembered going to Pleasant Grove which was also known as Pleasant Grove Academy. The building which was a log building was also used as a school as well as a church. Lattie went to school here in 1873, 1874, and 1876. She remembered that she received a book as a prize for receiving the most high marks in spelling for the year. The teachers she remembered were Joe Staples 1873, John Davis 1875, and Mark Williams 1876. She said the school lasted three months each year. She said her mother Mrs. Mary Langley Davis, attended Waldens Academy at Montgomery, Tennessee, located North of Wartburg Tennessee, and that she taught school at Fairview, Coalfield. She remembered that her mother as a little ashamed of teaching. Women in those days did not work outside their home very much.

Some of the prominent early settlers of Coalfield were Professor John M. Davis, a member of county court and a teacher for many years. One of the schools where he got his education was American Temperance in Harriman Tennessee. Professor Tom Davis was a teacher, a member of the county court and a slave owner. William C. Davis was a school commissioner when John (Shack) Ruffer deeded the area of land to be used as a church and school. Thomas H. Davis married Lucinda Stonecypher and they had a son John M. Davis in 1843. After John M. Davis 1777-1851 died his son Thomas H. Davis inherited his slaves. Thomas H Davis’ property was in Fairview Community. One was of the slaves was old “Major Davis”. He is buried in the Davis cemetery by the side of his master John M. Davis. After the civil war was over and the slaves were freed, Major Davis stayed on with the Davis family. He had learned to love them and this was his only life. Thomas Davis has spent hours playing with the slave when the were children.

When John M. Davis went off to college he took Major Davis with him to wash his clothes and carry his books. Major Davis was listed in the 1870 census as Black, age 60, living in the household of Thomas H. Davis. When John M. Davis, 1843, mother died she left him her property. This is where Mabel Wilson lived now in Fairview, Coalfield Tennessee. Note: John M. Davis had $1500 loses from 1860 until time of his death in personal property.

Kenneth Scarbrough a grandson of Lattie Goddard relates to a interesting incident:

John M. Davis always kept some good stock (horses, pigs, chickens, etc) and people all around knew this. He always had fine mules. As is the truth today there were thieves back in those days. If anyone had anything they wanted bad enough, they took it. One night someone stole one of John M. Davis’ fine mules. He didn’t wait for the law to take over. He climbed on his horse and tracked down the man with his mule. The thief had gone nearly all the way to Kentucky with it. John M Davis followed the tracks to a house and walked in. The man was asleep but had awakened. John M Davis beat the mule thief to the draw and killed him in his own bed. He paid for his burial and returned home.

Mary M. Davis who married John C. Jackson was my Great Aunt Georgia’s grandmother. Georgia never had the privilege of meeting her. She died when Georgia’s father was six years old. Mary and John C. had children, Georgia’s father being the youngest. Georgia’s grandfather married two years later after Mary’s death to Abigail Duncan and they had four children. “Abba” was good to Mary’s children and they loved her . Mary’s picture is in Georgia’s “Jackson Family Tree Book”. Georgia’s sister Irene Jackson married Thomas Ellis Davis a son of Samuel L. Davis who was Thomas H. Sr.’s son. They had a son Tommy Heath Davis and a daughter Mary Jo, Mrs. Dickey Wilson. Ellis died June 18, 1978, born June 26, 1931. Georgia’s sister Ruth married Glenn Davis a son of Hugh Davis whose father and mother was Joseph Davis and Lucy Morgan.

John M. Davis 1907 Wartburg Tennessee was listed in the ad of county lawyers found in the county newspaper and catalogs of this period. John M. Davis (a later John M. Davis) was a lawyers for Morgan County. He served in the office of sessions judge.

To become a lawyer in earlier days did not require as many qualifications as are necessary today. John M. Davis was listed as having practiced in the circuit court of Morgan county in 1894. He made application for law license and was issued on Marc 28 1994.

Honorable Rueben A. Davis was county Judge for Morgan County January 6. 1890. The county clerk minutes gives records of the following people owning slaves. Among them were Rueben Davis.

Miss Eliza Williams told the following story:

Rueben A. Davis, grandfather of Eliza Williams, married Lucinda Summers, daughter of Bill and Clarisson Staples Summers, of White Oak, near Sunbright. They live at Eatons Cross Road in Loudeon County Tennessee. When the Civil War broke out they then had two small children, Virginia who married John B Williams and John M. Davis, who was a prominent Morgan County lawyer. Reuben.A. Davis as a Captain made up a company of men and took them to Kentucky to join the Union Army. He left his wife, Lucinda, and two small children on a small farm that had a brick house containing 14 rooms, and a slave to help her.

During the time that Reuben was gone, the confederates camped at their farm, and also burned up the rail fence, using all the food that she had such as meat, chicken, turkeys, etc. The slave kept the two horses under a large cliff on the hillside near by. When Mrs. Davis wanted him to come to the house to eat she would blow an old cows horn. He would then take back grain for the horses. The confederate officers who camped in her home told her that they would not bother her, but that she had better go to her people.

So she got the woman who was helping her to ride one of her horses and she rode the other, bringing the two small children and all the belongings that they could carry on the horses about a distance of 66 miles and came to her parents on White Oak Creek. She told the slave that he would have to go as she no longer could keep him. Reuben .A. Davis later became a Lt. Col. . After the war was over, he purchased a farm which is now the State Honor Farm on upper Flat Fork, and lived there until his death. This farm is located about 5 miles east of Wartburg.

Once during the war, he got word to his wife Lucinda, that they were marching through Montgomery and asked her to come there so he could see her. Mrs. Davis was at Montgomery at sunrise, having come alone on a horse. She waited all day and just before dark, she got to see him marching by and could only wave to him. On the farm that Reuben. A. Davis bought, there was a Negro preacher named Henry Curd and his wife, Vina Curd, who had been slaves. They lived on the place with Mr. and Mrs. Davis and besides preaching, he did blacksmith work. Mrs. Lottie Goddard told of going to school in Wartburg with her brother Thomas H. Davis. She remembered going to the big spring for water. You can find her name Charlotte Davis and that of her brother, Thomas H. Davis in the list of students that is listed as some to the students of Waldin’s Academy

Ancestors and

Descendants of

Henry Davis

who came to

Bedford County, TN,

from

Brunswick County, VA,

between 1800-1810

The DAVIS family history

Henry Davis, who emigrated from Brunswick County, VA, to Bedford County, TN, has always

been well-documented within Bedford County land and historical records. It is known that he

came to TN at or about the same time as one of his brothers, Thomas Davis, during the first

decade of the nineteenth century. Thomas and Henry bought property in and near Shelbyville

and Fairfield, Bedford County, TN, and occasionally purchased land together. In 1819, Henry

purchased a mill near present day Fairfield, Bedford County; for a time, that area was known as

Davis’ Mill. Henry, his son, John S. Davis, and John’s son, Benjamin F. Davis, all served as postmasters

of Fairfield. The Davis family remained in Fairfield until at least 1870, based on the federal

census of that year. Sometime during the 1870s, my great-grandfather, Benjamin F. Davis,

Henry’s grandson, built the first brick store in nearby Wartrace and went into business there.

Henry and Thomas Davis have been traced back to Brunswick County, VA. They are listed in

their father’s will: Benjamin Franklin Davis, who died in Brunswick County, VA, in 1817.

Benjamin Davis’ will stated specifically that Henry and Thomas were living in “the County of

Bedford, State of Tennessee.” Without question, this is the same family. Even naming patterns

continue to this day.

Other families related by marriage to Henry Davis and his ancestors/descendants include:

  • Ballard
  • Bullock
  • Burt
  • Collier
  • Jennings
  • Marriott

This history is in two parts; each begins with my great-grandparents, Benjamin Franklin Davis,

of Wartrace, Bedford County, TN, and his wife, Margaret Anita Jennings. Part 1 begins with this

couple and traces their ancestors back to 17th century Virginia and the Carolinas. Part 2 was my

mother’s family history project, completed in 1978, and includes all known descendants of Ben

and Maggie Davis during the 100 years following their marriage. Any information about family

members included in the family history was written by that person, or by a family member who

knew him/her. At this time (June, 2009), none of the grandchildren of Ben and Maggie Davis are

living; the youngest grandchild, Evelyn Davis Ervin, died last summer. The last page of Part 2

lists deaths and marriages since 1978 for which I have records; unfortunately not all branches of

the family have remained in contact, and so this information is, of necessity, incomplete. In deference

to the privacy of the living, current addresses or the names of younger descendants are not

included with this document. However, if you are researching this family, you may contact me

through our family history website: http://www.a-trails.com

The data provided here is intended only as basic information, although I do have reference copies

of all data included. It is my hope that this information may assist genealogical researchers, and

may help other Bedford County, TN, Davis descendants trace their ancestry.

Carolyn German Bausinger

June, 2009

  • Powell
  • Rose
  • Sims
  • Swepson
  • Warren

Ancestors of

Margaret Anita Jennings

and

Benjamin Franklin Davis

Married on February 3, 1876

In 1978, Marguerite Howard German, a granddaughter of Margaret Jennings and Benjamin

Franklin Davis, assembled a history of their descendants for 100 years following the date of their

marriage, from 1876 – 1976. Copies were sent to all descendants of the Jennings-Davis family.

This supplemental document begins in 1876 and traces earlier generations of both families. A list

of many sources is included. Some sources, however, are written notes based on conversations

with older family members; these were written by the children and grandchildren of Maggie and

Ben Davis. Only information which could be verified has been included here.

The Jennings family history is straightforward and brief. The original member of that family to

emigrate from England to the colonies was John Jennings, who (it is believed) received an eighteenth

century land grant in South Carolina, from King George III. The Jennings family is welldocumented

in South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Texas and other southern states. John

Jennings is listed as a Revolutionary War patriot by the Daughters of the American Revolution.

The Davis family relationships are extensive, convoluted and often difficult to follow. Benjamin

Franklin Davis’ parents were related to each other; and members of the Sims, Burt and other

families intermarried through a number of generations. Tracing them and noting these marriages

has been interesting! At least six Revolutionary War patriots are known to be among our Davis

ancestors: Leonard Henley Sims and Dempsey Powell of NC; Benjamin Davis, John Rose,

William Burt, and Richard Swepson, Sr., of VA. It is very possible there are others, as well.

No attempt has been made to identify each generation as I, II, III, etc; the large number of overlapping

generations and intermarriages would make this both difficult and confusing.

Carolyn German Bausinger

June 2009

INDEX

DAVIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

BALLARD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

BULLOCK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

BURT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

JENNINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

MARRIOTT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

POWELL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

ROSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

SIMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

SWEPSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

WARREN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

SOURCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

5

NAME: Benjamin Franklin Davis

FATHER: John Sims Davis

MOTHER: Frances Lenoir Burt

DATE PLACE

BORN: 5 July 1845 Fairfield, TN

DIED: 15 August 1881 Fairfield, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: 1) Susan Catherine “Kittie” Scruggs 1 26 Dec 1871 Bedford County, TN

2) Margaret Anita “Maggie” Jennings 3 Feb. 1876 Bedford County, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Frances Eudora “Dora” 3 25 Oct. 1876 Wartrace, TN

Benjamin Franklin “Frank” 4 4 July 1878 Wartrace, TN

Gertrude (died at birth) 5 ca 1880 Wartrace, TN

Sara Blanche “Blanche” 6 5 Jan. 1881 Wartrace, TN

NOTES: 1) Ben F. Davis’ first wife, Kittie Scruggs Davis, was born 26 March 1849 in

Fairfield, Bedford County, TN and died 22 Jan 1875. She is buried next to Ben

Davis in the New Hope Baptist Church cemetery in Fairfield; no children.

2) Ben Davis appears in the 1870 census as living with his mother; in the 1880 census,

as a retired merchant of Wartrace. He appears, too, in Goodspeed and other histories

of both Fairfield, where he was a postmaster, and Wartrace, where he owned a store.

3) Dora Davis married Thompson Allen. Dora died 16 Sept 1965 in Irvington, VA.

  • One daughter, Margaret Almira Allen (1905-1982): married Paul Jones Myatt.

4) Frank Davis (B.F. Davis, Jr.) married Mary Jane Boyle on 4 April 1905. Frank died

on 22 August 1943 in Wartrace, Bedford County, TN.

  • Seven children:

Benjamin Franklin “Ben” Davis, III (1906-1995); married Mary Frances Thompson

Mary Boyle Davis (1908 – 2002); unmarried

Ralph Houston Davis (1910 – 1990); married Susanne Cannon Moore

Polly Ann Davis (1912 -1994); married Otto Charles Bohlander

Willellen Davis ( 1915-1999); married John W. Blinn

Robert Jennings “Pete” Davis (1922-1944); unmarried

Evelyn Davis (1926 -2008); married Max Gore Ervin

5) The baby’s name, Gertrude, was found in Dora Davis Allen’s handwritten family

history notes

6) Blanche Davis married Frederick John Howard, 1 Nov 1909 in Birmingham, AL.

Fred Howard died on 30 April 1930. Blanche married Sidney Herbert Lynn, on

2 Sept. 1932. Blanche died on 21 Dec. 1969, in Safety Harbor, FL.

  • Three children:

Frederick John Howard, Jr. (1912-2004); married Beulah Sellers

Victor George Howard (1914-1999); married Nell Fairchild

Sara Marguerite Howard (1916-1986); married Harold Leedom German

NAME: John Sims Davis

FATHER: Henry Davis

MOTHER: Nancy Powell Sims

DATE PLACE

BORN: 15 Nov 1818 Shelbyville, TN

DIED: 1 Apr 1867 1 Fairfield, TN2

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Frances Lenoir “Fannie” Burt 3 31 Mar 1842 Franklin County, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William Henry 5 ca 1844 Fairfield, TN

Benjamin Franklin 5 5 Jul 1845 Fairfield, TN

Nancy 5 ca 1848 Fairfield, TN

Thomas Burt 5 ca 1849 Fairfield, TN

John Sims 5 ca 1851 Fairfield, TN

Samuel Powell 5 ca 1852 Fairfield, TN

Robert L. 5 ca 1855 Fairfield, TN

Emma 5 ca 1858 Fairfield, TN

NOTES: 1) John Sims Davis is buried in the New Hope Baptist Church cemetery, Fairfield,

Bedford County. It is not known where Frances Burt Davis is buried; no grave

stone has been found. However, there is the base of a headstone on the right of

John Sims Davis’ marker, and this may mark her grave; her newspaper obituary

stated that she was buried in Fairfield, and this is the only logical location.

2) John Sims Davis is well documented in various sources within Bedford

County, including:

The Bedford County, Tennessee, Family History Book (published 2002 by the

Turner Publishing Co.) lists John S. Davis as a postmaster of Fairfield (p. 41).

The book also indicates (p. 130) that additional land for the construction of

New Hope Baptist Church in Fairfield was given by Fannie and John S. Davis.

3) Frances Burt and her husband, John Sims Davis were closely related through the

Sims, Powell and Burt lines.

4) 1850 Bedford County TN census P 82b Dist 1 HH 61-61:

John S Davis 32 M Tn Farmer $4,000 (son of Henry Davis & Nancy Sims)

Frances – 25 F NC (Burt, daughter of William Burt & Susanna Sims)

Henry – 6 M Tn, Benjamin – 4 M Tn, Thomas – 1 M Tn

5) Wm Henry Davis did not marry

Benjamin Franklin Davis married 1) Kittie Scruggs; and 2) Margaret Jennings

Nancy Davis died young; did not marry; buried New Hope Baptist churchyard

Thomas Burt Davis married Alice Finch

John Sims Davis married Julia March; their son, Henry Davis, started the annual

Wartrace Tennessee Walking Horse celebration during the 1930s.

Samuel Powell Davis married Paralee Walker

Robert L. Davis did not marry

Emma Davis — no information; an E.W. D. marker is next to her father’s grave.

6

NAME: Henry Davis

FATHER: Benjamin Franklin Davis

MOTHER: Tabitha Rose

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1785-1790 prob. Mecklenburg Co., VA

DIED: prior to1839 Bedford County, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Nancy Powell Sims 3 ca 1818 Bedford County, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: John Sims 4 15 Nov 1818 Bedford County, TN

Emily M. 4 ca 1820 Bedford County, TN

Sarah Ann 4 27 Apr 1822 Bedford County, TN

Virginia P. 4 25 Oct 1825 Bedford County, TN

Mary R. 4 ca 1826 Bedford County, TN

Charlotte S. 4 ca 1828 Bedford County, TN

NOTES: 1) Goodspeed History of Bedford County lists Henry Davis as an early settler.

2) The Bedford County, Tennessee, Family History Book (Turner Publishing Co.; 2002)

lists Henry Davis as an early mill owner (1819) and postmaster of Fairfield, TN.

3) Nancy Sims was the daughter of John Sims [p. 43] and Charlotte Powell [p. 34]

4) John Sims married Frances L. Burt [p. 30]; sister of Wm. Burt, who married John’s

sister, Virginia Davis

Emily Davis married George W. McQuiddy

Sarah Davis married William T. Edmunson

Virginia Davis married 1) Mr. Charlton (?); and 2) William H. Burt

Mary Davis married Wiley F. Stone

Charlotte Davis married Nathan A. Yeargin and moved to TX

5) Henry and his brother, Thomas Davis, arrived in Bedford County at or about the

same time. The brothers bought property separately and together in Shelbyville

and Fairfield, Bedford Co, TN ca. 1810-1820. They were sons of Benjamin Davis

of Brunswick County, VA, and listed in his April, 1817, will, filed in Brunswick

County (B.C. Will Book 8, pg. 342; B.C. Deed Book 24, pg. 52). During the

resulting property settlement in Oglethorpe County, GA, where their brother,

Benjamin Davis, Jr., lived, the residence of all the Davis siblings was provided:

“William Davis, John Brown and Elizabeth his wife, Martha Davis and Merritt

Davis of the County of Brunswick, State of Virginia, Benjamin Davis of Oglethorpe

County, State of Georgia, Peter Ragsdale of Bedford County, State of Tennessee,

as attorney in fact for Thomas Davis and Henry Davis of the County of

Bedford, State of Tennessee, and as attorney in fact for John Davis of the County

of Robertson, State of Tennessee…” (From Emigration to Other States From Southside

Virginia, Volume I, by Katherine B. Elliott; 1966.)

7

8

NAME: Benjamin Franklin Davis

FATHER: Henry Davis

MOTHER: Mary Marriott

DATE PLACE

BORN: Surry County, VA

DIED: April 1817 1 Brunswick County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Tabitha Rose 2 ca 1778-80 prob.Brunswick County,VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William

Elizabeth 3

Benjamin Franklin, Jr. 4 25 April 1784 VA

Martha

Merritt

Henry 5 ca 1785-90 VA

Thomas 5

John

NOTES: 1) Emigration to Other States from Southside Virginia, Volume I, includes a copy of

Benjamin Franklin Davis’ April, 1817 will; all living children are listed in the will.

(Original is in Brunswick County, VA, Deed Book 24, page 52)

2) Tabitha Rose was the daughter of John Rose [p. 38] and Abigail Hicks.

Tabitha Rose Davis died before 1810.

3) William, Elizabeth, Martha Merritt and John were living in Brunswick Co., VA,

at the time their father died in 1817.

Elizabeth married John Brown in Brunswick Co., VA, on 27 February 1800.

(Brunwick County Marriage Records, page 119)

4) Benjamin Franklin, Jr., moved, first, to GA land claimed by his father for service in

the GA militia during the Revolutionary War, and was living in Oglethorpe Co.,

GA, at the time his father died in 1817. In 1809, he sold part of that land. Later,

he moved to Autauga Co., AL. He married Martha Taylor, in 1816. Martha was the

daughter of Benjamin Taylor of Oglethorpe County, GA.

5) Henry and Thomas both moved to Bedford County, TN, about 1800-1810. When

their father’s will was probated, they were represented by Peter Ragsdale, a

Bedford County TN attorney, and named, specifically as living in the County of

Bedford, State of Tennessee.” Both men are well doucmented in Bedford County.

9

NAME: Henry Davis

FATHER: James Davis, Sr.

MOTHER: Elizabeth Warren

DATE PLACE

BORN: Surry County, VA

DIED: bef 17 March 1767 1 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Mary Marriott 2 ca 1732/33 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William Surry County, VA

Ann Surry County, VA

Hannah Surry County, VA

Benjamin 3 Surry County, VA

Isham Surry County, VA

Randolph Surry County, VA

Elizabeth 3 Surry County, VA

Henry Surry County, VA

Kezia Surry County, VA

Marriott Surry County, VA

Silvia Surry County, VA

James Surry County, VA

NOTES: 1) Virginia Historical Genealogies, by John Bennett Boddie, includes a chapter on this

Davis family, beginning on pg. 255. Date for his death is sometime between the

date of his will (Feb. 18, 1767) and the date it was probated (March 17, 1767).

The original of the will is filed in Surry County, VA—B.K. 1754-68, p.448.

2) Mary Marriott was the daughter of William Marriott [p. 31] and his wife, Sarah

Collier. William Marriott was the son of Matthias Marriot and his wife, Alice

Warren, daughter of Thomas Warren. Alice’s half brother, Thomas Warren, Jr., was

the father of Elizabeth Warren, who married James Davis, Sr., and was Henry

Davis’ mother.

3) Elizabeth Davis married John Rose in Brunswick County, VA, on January 28, 1775.

John’s sister, Tabitha Rose, married Elizabeth’s brother, Benjamin Davis (pp. 8, 37

and 38).

All children listed above were named in the will. There may have been other

children who died unmarried and before their parents.

10

NAME: James Davis, Sr.

FATHER: Thomas Davis

MOTHER: Elizabeth

DATE PLACE

BORN: ? Surry County, VA

DIED: 1746 1 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Elizabeth Warren 2 bef. 1704 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Thomas 3 Surry County, VA

Jane 3 Surry County, VA

John 3 Surry County, VA

James 3 Surry County, VA

Henry 3 Surry County, VA

Robert 3 Surry County, VA

Nathaniel 3 Surry County, VA

Anne 3 Surry County, VA

NOTES: 1) Virginia Historical Genealogies, by John Bennett Boddie, includes a chapter on this

Davis family, beginning on pg. 255. Date for his death is sometime after the date of

his will (Sept. 4, 1746).

2) Elizabeth Warren was the daughter of Elizabeth and Thomas Warren, Jr (see p. 57).

Mary Marriott, who married Henry Davis (son of James Davis, Jr., and Elizabeth

Warren), was Elizabeth’s cousin. Mary Marriott’s grandmother was Alice Warren

Marriott, who was the older half-sister of Thomas Warren, Jr.

3) Thomas Davis died 1848; lived Isle of Wight County, VA.

Jane Davis married a Warren.

John Davis may have moved to Brunswick County, VA.

James Davis died 1783; lived Surry County, VA; married Elizabeth Baldwin.

Henry Davis died 1767; lived Surry County, VA; married Mary Marriott.

Robert Davis died 1749; lived Pasquotank County, NC; married Sarah Chapman?

Nathaniel Davis may have moved to Hyde County, NC

Anne Davis married James Nicholson ca. 1740; their son, also named James,

married Elizabeth Woodruff.

All children listed above were named in the will. There may have been other

children who died unmarried and before their parents.

11

NAME: Thomas Davis

FATHER: Unknown

MOTHER: Unknown

DATE PLACE

BORN: Probably England

DIED: Sept 1716–Dec. 1720 1 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Elizabeth Unknown

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: James 2

Elizabeth 3 Surry County, VA

Thomas Surry County, VA

Jane Surry County, VA

Henry Surry County, VA

NOTES: 1) Virginia Historical Genealogies, by John Bennett Boddie, includes a chapter on this

Davis family, beginning on pg. 255. Date for his death is between the date of his

will (Sept. 28, 1716) and the date it was probated (Dec. 21, 1720).

Thomas Davis was in the Surry County Militia and appeared as a tithable in 1688.

His son, James, recieved a grant of 100 acres in Surry County in 1722, for imporing

his parents many years before. Since Thomas and his wife had lived in VA for

over 40 years, it is assumed they made a return trip to England.

2) I have assumed that James Davis was the oldest son of Thomas and Elizabeth

Davis, because his father left him “all land and houses” he possessed.

3) Elizabeth Davis married Matthew Ellis; their children, Matthew, Thomas, Elizabeth

and Isabel, were named in James Davis’ will.

All other children listed above were named in the will. There may have been other

children who died unmarried and before their parents.

The Ballard Family

Beginning with Salumith Ballard

Wife of William Burt

[See page 21]

13

NAME: Salumith Ballard

FATHER: William Ballard (believed to be William Sorrell Ballard

MOTHER: Elizabeth Clopton

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1750

DIED: 1841 Warren County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: William Burt ca 1780 ? Halifax County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William 11 Nov 1782 Warren County, NC

John A. 1 June 1800 Warren County, NC

Salumith “Sallie”

Lucretia A.

Elizabeth

Ann

Harriet D. ca 1797

NOTES: 1) See page 21 for notes about the children of Salumith Ballard and William Burt.

NAME: William Ballard

FATHER: John Ballard — unverified

MOTHER: Elizabeth Bland — unverified

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1715 VA

DIED: 2 Feb 1774 Halifax County NC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Elizabeth Clopton 2 ca 1735

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Mary 5 ca 1737 probably VA

Joyce 5 ca 1740 probably VA

Elizabeth 5 ca 1743 probably VA

William Sorrell 5 ca 1746 probably VA

Martha F 5 ca 1749 probably VA

Salumith 5 ca 1750 probably VA

Nancy Ann 5 ca 1751 probably VA

Walter Clopton 5 ca 1753 probably VA

Devereaux 5 ca 1756 probably VA

NOTES: 1) William Ballard is often written of as Captain William Ballard or as William

Sorrell Ballard

2) Elizabeth Clopton is said to be the daughter of Walter Clopton and Mary Jarrat;

the name, “Devereaux,” is from the Clopton family, which some researchers

believe can be traced as far back as the 12th century in Suffolk, England.

3) A Lunenburg County, VA, deed, dated 3 Dec 1735, mentions William Ballard.

4) William Ballard appears to have moved to the Scotland Neck area in Halifax

County, NC, ca. 1760.

5) The children of William and Elizabeth Ballard married:

Mary married Mr. Allen

Joyce married Mr. Langley

Elizabeth married Mr. Freeman

Martha married Mr. Finch

Nancy married General William Lenoir

Salumith married William Burt [p. 21]

Walter C. married Rebecca Taylor

Devereaux — no information

14

The Bullock Family

Beginning with Sarah Bullock

Wife of John Sims, Jr.

[See page 45]

NAME: Sarah Bullock

FATHER: Richard Bullock

MOTHER: Ann Henley

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1720 or earlier

DIED: 1766 Granville County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: John Sims, Jr. ca. 1734 Hanover County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William ca. 1736

Leonard Henley 2 July 1738

Elisha

Agness

Dorcas

Sarah

Susanna

Mary

Lucretia

Euphrates

NOTES: 1) See page 45 for notes about the children of Sarah Bullock and John Sims, Jr.

16

NAME: Richard Bullock

FATHER: Edward Bullock

MOTHER: Sarah Dalby

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1690

DIED: ca 1764 Granville County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Ann Henley ca 1710-1715 ? New Kent County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Agnes ca 1715

Susannah ca 1717

Zachariah ca 1718

Sarah ca 1720

William ca 1721

John ca 1724

Henry ca 1727

Anne ca 1728

Leonard Henley ca 1736

? Nathaniel

NOTES: 1) Ann Henley was the daughter of Leonard Henley and Elizabeth Richardson. She

was born in VA ca 1693 and died ca 1764 in Granville County, NC

2) Some sources list all the above children as those of Richard and Ann Henley

Bullock. Not all are verified, although records indicate that Sarah Bullock Sims was

one of their children. Certainly, the fact that one of her sons was named Leonard

Henley Sims would appear to support this.

17

The Burt Family

Beginning with Frances Lenoir Burt

Wife of John Sims Davis

[See page 6]

NAME: Frances Lenoir Burt

FATHER: William Burt

MOTHER: Susanna Sims

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca. 1826 Warren County, NC

DIED: 6 Aug 1891 Wartrace, Bedford Co., TN

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: John Sims Davis 31 Mar 1842 Franklin County, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William Henry 1 ca 1844 Fairfield, TN

Benjamin Franklin 1 5 Jul 1845 Fairfield, TN

Nancy 1 ca 1848 Fairfield, TN

Thomas Burt 1 ca 1849 Fairfield, TN

John Sims 1 ca 1851 Fairfield, TN

Samuel Powell 1 ca 1852 Fairfield, TN

Robert L. 1 ca 1855 Fairfield, TN

Emma 1 ca 1858 Fairfield, TN

NOTES: 1) See page 6 for notes about the children of Fannie Burt and John Sims Davis

19

NAME: William Burt

FATHER: William Burt

MOTHER: Salumith Ballard

DATE PLACE

BORN: 11 Nov. 1782 Warren County, NC

DIED: 31 Dec 1848 Winchester Springs,TN

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Susanna (or Susan) Sims 3 Nov 1812 Mecklenburg County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Elizabeth Jane ca 1813 NC

Sally Ann ca 1815 NC

Harriett Amanda 4 Aug 1817 Nash County, NC

William H. 1818/1819 Nash County, NC

Thomas S. 1819/1820 Nash County, NC

Susan A. before 1824 Warren County, NC

Frances Lenoir “Fannie” ca. 1826 Warren County, NC

Cassandra L. 6 Mar 1829 Nash County, NC

John L. 21 Oct 1830 Nash County, NC

Mary Ballard before 1832 Warren County, NC

Nash H. 27 Jun 1832 Nash or Warren Cty, NC

Richard Burt 4 Nov 1836 Nash or Warren Cty, NC

Lucy 1839

Salumith “Luna” 1840-1842

NOTES: 1) In 1838, William and Susanna Sims moved to Franklin County, TN.

2) William Burt made his will on 30 May 1848. All of the children listed above were

named in the will. Additional information from his will includes:

Lucy and Salumith were his youngest daughters

Sally Ann married Peter Arrington and lived in North Carolina

Harriett A. married James J. Phillips and lived in North Carolina

Elizabeth J. married John R. Horne; Elizabeth predeceased her father; she and

John Horne had three sons: Leonidas, Oscar and Clarence Horne

Frances L. married Mr. (John) Davis (see p. 6).

Susan A. married Mr. (John) Streeter

Thomas S. married Martha (MNU)

William H. Burt, his son, was one of three executors of William Burt’s will,

which was proved in Franklin County court on 7 Feb. 1849

3) Additional marriages of interest within the Davis-Sims families:

William H. Burt married Virginia P. Davis, sister of John Sims Davis (see p. 7).

Lucy Burt married William E. Sims; parents of Luna Mildred Sims (see p. 43).

4) After her husband’s death, Susan Sims Burt (see Sims Family, p. 44) moved to

Bedford County, TN, where she died on 1 Dec 1876. She is buried at Willow

Mount Cemetery in Shelbyville, Bedford County, TN. Several of her children are

buried next to her.

20

NAME: William Burt

FATHER: William Burt

MOTHER: Lucy (MNU)

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1754 ? Mecklenburg County, VA

DIED: 8 July 1823 2 Warren County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Salumith Ballard ca 1780 ? Halifax County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William 11 Nov 1782 Warren County, NC

John A. 1 June 1800 Warren County, NC

Salumith “Sallie”

Lucretia A.

Elizabeth

Ann

Harriet D. ca 1797

NOTES: 1) The Halifax County NC deed book provides the first record of William Burt in

NC in Book 17, p. 442 11 June 1778. This date is more likely to be 1788, as Wm.

Burt does not appear in the 1779 or 1784 Warren County tax lists. He is, however,

listed on the 1790 Warren County census as having 3 white males over age 16,

2 white males under age 16, 3 white females and 20 slaves.

2) Revolutionary War Records Mecklenburg County, Virginia, by Katherine B.

Elliott, 1964 uses as a source, Virginia DAR Register, page 445; gives William’s

death as 8 July 1823, Warren County, NC.

3) William Burt made his will on 10 May 1823, which was presented to the August

1823 Court (Will Book 25, page 178). All of the children listed above were

named in the will. Additional information from his will and other sources:

  • Salumith married Henry Sims on 29 Nov 1813 in Warren County, NC
  • Lucretia married Martin R. Garrett on 25 Jan 1820 in Warren County, NC

4) Salumith Ballard Burt made her will on 23 April 1840, which was proved in 1848.

Her will adds the following information about her children:

  • John A. Burt married Emily M. Cheek on 9 Oct 1830 in Warren County, NC;

died on 27 Mar 1845

  • No marriage is indicated for daughter Elizabeth; died 1852 in Nash County, NC
  • No marriage is indicated for daughter Ann; died after 1852
  • No marriage is indicated for daughter Harriet died 24 Sept 1823 in Warren Cty.
  • Salumith Sims had a daughter named Harriet William Ballard Sims and a son

named Leonard S. Sims

  • Lucretia Garrett had a son named Samuel Brown Garrett

21

NAME: William Burt

FATHER: Richard Burt the Elder

MOTHER: Elizabeth Moody

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1700 – 1702 York County, VA

DIED: ca 1783/1784 Greensville County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Lucy (MNU) ca 1732 VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Mary ca 1735 VA

Lucy ca 1739 VA

Elizabeth ca 1745 VA

Harwood ca 1746 VA

William ca 1750 VA

NOTES: 1) William Burt’s will was recorded in Book 1, pp. 32-33, Greenville County, VA and

was dated 15 Oct 1782. Executors were William Burt and Harwood Burt. The will

was proved on 27 Feb 1783.

2) Mary Burt was named in her father’s will with a married name of Tooke

Elizabeth Burt was named in her father’s will with a married name of Kelbie

Lucy Burt was named in her father’s will with a married name of Haley

Harwood Burt md. Margaret Tenham ca 1761 in VA; died ca 1803, York Cty. VA

22

NAME: Richard Burt (the Elder)

FATHER: ? Richard Burt?

MOTHER: Unknown

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1665 ? VA ?

DIED: 1745 York County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: 1) Elizabeth Hansford ca 1687 VA

2) Elizabeth Moody 2 ca 1695 York County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: By his first wife, Elizabeth Hansford:

Richard Burt (the Younger) ca 1691 VA

By his second wife, Elizabeth Moody:

Moody Burt 3 ca 1696 York County, VA

Josias Burt 3 ca 1698 York County, VA

Martha Burt 3 ca 1700 York County, VA

William Burt 3 ca 1701 York County, VA

Judith Burt 3 ca 1702 York County, VA

Elias Burt 3 ca 1705 York County, VA

NOTES: 1) Richard the Elder’s father may have been named Richard Burt, too. There are

records showing a Richard Burt was living in Charles River County of colonial

VA in 1642 and 1649. This person was in the portion of Charles River County

that later became Gloucester County.

2) Some sources indicate that Richard’s second wife, Elizabeth Moody, was the

daughter of Josias Moody and Elizabeth Folliott; the Folliott family has been

traced to the 16th century in England and show that the family came to Hampton

Parish in the Virginia colony in the mid-17th century.

3) Online records indicate that the children of Richard and Elizabeth Moody Burt

married:

  • Josias Burt married Elizabeth Moody, daughter of Philip Moody and Elizabeth
  • Moody Burt married Elizabeth (MNU)
  • William Burt married Lucy (MNU)
  • Judith married Francis Peters
  • Elias Burt married Anne Finnell
  • Martha Burt — no information available

23

The Jennings Family

Beginning with Margaret Anita Jennings

Wife of Benjamin Franklin Davis, Sr.

[See page 5]

NAME: Margaret Anita Jennings

FATHER: Hasting Jennings

MOTHER: Susannah Newton

DATE PLACE

BORN: 26 Mar 1843 Edgefield District SC

DIED: 23 Oct 1921 Chattanooga TN

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Benjamin Franklin Davis 3 Feb 1876 Wartrace, Bedford Cty, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Frances Eudora “Dora” Oct. 1876 Wartrace, TN

Benjamin Franklin “Frank” 4 July 1878 Wartrace, TN

Gertrude ca 1880 Wartrace TN

Sara Blanche “Blanche” 5 Jan. 1881 Wartrace, TN

NOTES: 1) Margaret Jennings Davis lived in a number of locations during her lifetime. She

was born in the Edgefield District of SC and lived there until she was 8 – 10

years of age. Her father, Hasting Jennings, sold their land in SC and moved his

family to GA during the early 1850s. Her mother, Susannah, died there in 1854.

Her father, Hasting, remarried and it appears the unmarried daughters may not have

gotten along well with his second wife, Nancy Anna (MNU) as the 1860 census

shows both Margaret (age 16) and her older sister, Elizabeth (age 18), living with

their oldest sister, Sarah Jennings Healan and her family in LaFayette, Walker

County, GA. The 1870 census shows her still living in LaFayette, GA, but with

another sister, Martha “Mattie” Jennings Fulmer and her children (Mattie’s husband

died during the Civil War). Margaret was listed in 1870 as teaching school. The

book, Documented Notes on Jennings and Allied Families, by Beatrice Mackey Doughtie,

quotes a letter from a Fulmer descendent, stating that, in 1873, Margaret Jennings

was teaching school in southwest GA and living with one Tillman Jennings (who

would have been her cousin). Some time between 1873 and 1876, Margaret moved

to Wartrace, TN, probably at the same time or shortly after her sister’s family (Sarah

and A.J. Healan) moved there to open a hotel, Healan House. Based on later census

data, Margaret remained in Wartrace nearly forty years before moving to Chattanooga,

where she spent the last seven years of her life with her youngest daughter, Blanche

Davis Howard, and her family.

2) Margaret Jennings Davis was well-educated. She attended Mary Sharp College, in

Winchester, Tennessee, and Louisville Female College, in Louisville, Kentucky.

3) Margaret and Ben Davis were married less than 6 years when he died, leaving her

with 3 very small children. Blanche, the youngest, was only 7 months old at that

time. Although in reduced financial circumstances, Margaret saw that they had the

best education she could provide, and supplemented their education at home.

4) Margaret is interred in Forest Hills Cemetery in Chattanooga, TN, between her

sons-in-law, Frederick Howard and Thompson Allen.

5) See page 5 for notes about the children of Margaret and Ben Davis.

25

NAME: Hasting Jennings

FATHER: William Jennings

MOTHER: Nancy Dove

DATE PLACE

BORN: 25 Jan 1814 Edgefield District, SC

DIED: Apr 1870 Walker County, GA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: 1) Susannah Newton 2 1812 Edgefield District, SC

2) Nancy Ann (MNU) ca 1858 GA

3) Sarah Elizabeth (MNU) ca 1867 GA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: By first wife, Susannah Newton:

Sarah Dove “Sallie” 27 Oct 1833 Edgefield District, SC

Mary A. 18 Jun 1836 Edgefield District, SC

Robert William 19 Mar 1838 Edgefield District, SC

Martha C. “Mattie” 29 Jul 1839 Edgefield District, SC

Elizabeth Newton 10 Jun 1841 Edgefield District, SC

Margaret Anita “Maggie” 26 Mar 1843 Edgefield District, SC

Tyre 16 Sep 1845 Edgefield District, SC

By second wife, Nancy Anna:

Richard Hasting 23 Oct 1858 Walker County, GA

Julia ca 1860 prob. Walker County, GA

John H. ca 1862 prob. Walker County, GA

Emma Jan 1866 prob. Walker County, GA

By third wife, Sarah Elizabeth:

Thomas ca 1868 prob. Walker County, GA

NOTES: 1) Hasting Jennings did not inherit property when his father, William, died.

William’s will states, in part: “The remaining part of my estate to be distributed

among my children in equal division, except my two sons, Tyre and Hasting

Jennings who are to receive $5 and no more on account of their misconduct to me.”

2) One of Hasting’s granddaughters, Bertie Healan Berry, wrote the following in 1918:

“Hasting Jennings [was] a student and a dreamer, the father of a large family and

was never able to maintain the financial status of his youth.”

3) From the Edgefield Advertiser, July 20, 1854: “Died on July 11, 1854, at Roswell,

Cobb County, Georgia, Mrs. Susannah Jennings, wife of Hasting Jennings, in the

43rd year of her age. She was raised, and lived, in Edgefield, S.C., until a few years

back, when with her husband and children moved to Georgia. Being not permanently

settled, she had not moved her membership from the Pleasant Grove

Baptist Church in Edgefield District.”

26

NAME: William Jennings

FATHER: John Jennings

MOTHER: Mary (MNU)

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1771/1772 SC

DIED: ca 1842 Edgefield District, SC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: 1) Nancy Dove ca 1793 Edgefield District, SC

2) Mrs. Eleanor Etheredge Richardson ca 1827 Edgefield District, SC

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: By first wife, Nancy Dove:

Tyre 16 Sep 1794 SC

Lucy 1795 SC

John B. 4 Feb 1797 SC

Nancy 1800 SC

Elizabeth 3 Nov 1802 SC

Mary 1804 Edgefield District, SC

Susannah 1807 Edgefield District, SC

Martha 1809 Edgefield District, SC

Hasting 29 Jan 1814 Edgefield District, SC

Letitia “Let” 1816 Edgefield District, SC

By second wife, Eleanor Etheredge Richardson:

Lott 31 Aug 1828 SC

Rachel 1830 SC

Eleanor “Ellen” 1832 SC

Frances “Fannie” 16 Nov 1834 SC

William 1836 SC

Philip 19 Feb 1846

NOTES: 1) William Jennings was a planter and, by all accounts, a man of wealth. He died at

home in the Edgefield District of SC.

2) A complete listing is available of the spouses and children of William’s children,

but it is not included here; see Documented Notes on Jennings and Allied Families, by

Beatrice Mackey Doughtie; 1961.

27

NAME: John Jennings, Sr.

FATHER: Unknown

MOTHER: Unknown

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1740-1745 probably SC

DIED: ca 1819 Edgefield District, SC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Mary (MNU)

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: James ca 1765-1770 probably SC

Lucy ca 1765-1770 probably SC

John, Jr. ca 1765-1770 probably SC

William ca 1771-1772 probably SC

Philip ca 1775-1780 probably SC

Jesse ca 1782 probably SC

Mary 1780-1790 probably SC

NOTES: 1) There are records showing that a John Jennings received a land grant from King

George III about 1770. Family names such as Tyre and Hasting are recorded with

this John Jennings, so it is likely this record is about “our” John Jennings. John

Jennings, Sr., bought land in Fairfield County, SC in1785. At that time, he

was living in Chester County, SC. He was listed in the 1790 census as living in the

Camden District, Fairfield County, SC. The 1800 census indicated he was living

in the Fairfield District. In 1804, he and wife, Mary, were living in Edgefield

District, SC, according to land records of the county.

2) John Jennings, Sr., died before 15 April 1820, for on that day, William Jennings

sold land on Dailey’s Creek, a branch of the Little Saluda River, to his brother,

Jesse. This land had belonged to their father, John Jennings, dec’d., and had been

bought by William at his father’s estate sale. In this deed, John Jennings was

referred to as John Jennings, Sr. On 2 February, 1828, Jesse and James Jennings,

executors of the estate of John Jennings, dec’d., conveyed 52 acres of land on the

north side of Beaver Dam Creek to William Jennings. Use of the term, executors,

would indicate that John Jennings, Sr., died testate but, to date, no will has been

found.

3) John Jennings, Sr. had seven known children, those listed above, who were identified

in the Philip Jennings estate file. (Apt. 60, Pkg. 2475, Edgefield County, SC)

Philip Jenning died in Edgefield District, SC, on 30 May 1848. He died intestate

and without issue. His estate was divided between his widow, Lucy Jennings, his

brother, Jesse Jennings, and the children of his deceased siblings. John Jennings,

Sr., may have had other children but no record of them has been found. If they

existed, either they died young or died prior to 1848 and without issue.

4) John Jennings has been identified as a Revolutionary patriot of SC, based on militia

duty with a Col. Anderson; SC Archives, Accts. Aud. #4027, Roll #48.79, Indent

442T; and Andrews, SC Revolutionary War Indents: A Schedule, page 33.

28

The Marriott Family

Beginning with Mary Marriott

Wife of Henry Davis

[See page 9]

NAME: Mary Marriott

FATHER: William Marriott

MOTHER: Sarah Collier

DATE PLACE

BORN: Surry County, VA

DIED:

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Henry Davis 1 bef 1725 2 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William Surry County, VA

Ann Surry County, VA

Hannah Surry County, VA

Benjamin Surry County, VA

Isham Surry County, VA

Randolph Surry County, VA

Henry Surry County, VA

Kezia Surry County, VA

Marriott Surry County, VA

Silvia Surry County, VA

James Surry County, VA

NOTES: 1) Virginia Historical Genealogies, by John Bennett Boddie, includes a chapter on this

Davis family, beginning on pg. 255, and on the Warren family, beginning on pg.

244.

2) The will of Thomas Collier, Sarah Collier Marriott’s father, dated 15 February 1728,

mentions “my daughter Sarah Marriott, wife of William Marriott… my grand

daughter, Mary Marriott…my grandsons William and Thomas Marriott…”

3) Mary Marriott was the daughter of William Marriott and his wife, Sarah Collier

William Marriott was the son of Matthias Marriot and his wife, Alice, daughter of

Thomas Warren. One of Alice’s half brothers, Thomas Warren, Jr., was the father of

Elizabeth Warren, who married James Davis, Sr., and, therefore, was Henry Davis’

mother.

All children listed above were named in the will. There may have been other

children who died unmarried and before their parents.

30

NAME: William Marriott

FATHER: Mathias Marriott

MOTHER: Alice Warren

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca. 1688 1 Surry County, VA

DIED: bef. 20 January 1767 2

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Sarah Collier bef. Nov. 1725 3

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Mary 4 Surry County, VA

William 4 Surry County, VA

Thomas 4 Surry County, VA

Mathias 4 Surry County, VA

Benjamin 4 Surry County, VA

John 4 Surry County, VA

NOTES: 1) William Marriott was the only son of Matthias Marriott. When his father’s will was

written in 1707, he appeared to be a minor; in 1710, he proved a legal document

under oath, so must have been of legal age at that time.

2) William Marriott’s will was dated 20 September 1765 and proved 20 January 1767.

3) Sarah and William Marriott signed a deed together on that date, so they must have

married earlier.

4) All children listed were named in William Marriott’s will. His wife, Sarah, was not

mentioned in the will, so it is assumed she died earlier.

31

NAME: Mathias Marriott

FATHER: Unknown

MOTHER: Unknown

DATE PLACE

BORN:

DIED: bef. 2 September 1707 1

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Alice Warren 2 bef Sept 1670 3

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William

Margaret 4

Elizabeth 4

Marion 4

NOTES: 1) Matthias Marriott’s will was dated 12 June 1707 and probated 2 September 1707.

Matthias Marriott and Alice Warren Marriot are included in the chapter on the

Warren family in Virginia Historical Genealogies, by John Bennett Boddie, beginning

on pg. 244.

2) One of Alice’s half brothers, Thomas Warren, Jr., was the father of

Elizabeth Warren, who married James Davis, Sr.; Alice and Mathias Marriott’s

granddaughter, Mary Marriott, married James Davis, Sr.’s son, Henry Davis.

3) On 24 September, 1670, an agreement was signed, settling a property dispute

between Jane Warren, Alice Warren Marriott’s stepmother, and her husband,

Mathias Marriott.

4) Margaret Marriott married Mr. Flake.

Elizabeth Marriott married Mr. Hill.

Marion Marriott married Mr. Chips

All children listed above were named in the will. There may have been other

children who died unmarried and before their parents.

32

The Powell Family

Beginning with Charlotte Powell

Wife of John Sims

[See page 42]

NAME: Charlotte Powell

FATHER: Dempsey Powell

MOTHER: Nancy [surname is believed to be Dempsey; unverified]

DATE PLACE

BORN: 29 July 1774 Wake Co., NC

DIED: 1828 Bedford County, TN

(or 7 October 1837?) (or Rutherford Co., TN?)

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: John Sims 30 Dec 1793 Wake County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Nancy Powell 18 Nov 1794 Wake County (?), MC

Leonard Powell 31 May 1797 Granville County, NC

Pleasant Benton 17 Feb 1799

John Swepson 20 Mar 1801

Richard Henry 1 Mar 1803 NC

James Lewis 11 Aug 1805

Sarah 12 Jun 1811

NOTES: 1) From the family Bible of Louisa Batey Sims and Leonard Henley Sims (son of

Swepson Sims; grandson of Leonard Henley Sims and Sarah Swepson):

“Leonard Sims, my grandfather, was born July 2nd, 1739, and died in 1804.

Sarah Swepson Sims, my grandmother, was born October 27th, 1752, and

died June 14, 1811. My uncle, John Sims, was born 1773, and died 1841.

Charlotte Sims, his wife, was born July 29th, 1774, and died October 7th,

  1. I remember the last two with great fondness, having no recollection

of my Grandfather and Mother. Signed: L.H. Sims”

This information was provided by George Ann Sims in May, 1999.

2) Nancy Powell Sims married Henry Davis; see page 7.

3) See page 42 for notes about the children of Charlotte Powell and John Sims

34

NAME: Dempsey Powell

FATHER: Nathaniel Powell

MOTHER: Elizabeth (MNU)

DATE PLACE

BORN: 2 sources: ca 1730 and ca 1740 Wake County, NC

DIED: 2 sources: 1793 and 15 Oct 1808 Wake County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: 1) Nancy (MNU); probably Dempsey ca 1765

2) Pleasant Benton

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN:

By his first wife, Nancy:

Elizabeth ca 1769 NC

Chloe ca 1770 NC

Charlotte 7 July 1774 Wake County, NC

By his second wife, Pleasant Benton:

Caswell

Jesse

Patsy ca 1780

Mildred 1785 Wake County, NC

Benton

Dempsey 29 Mar 1802 NC

NOTES: 1) Dempsey Powell is listed in the DAR Patriot Index as follows:

  1. ca. 1730 NC; d. 1793 NC; m . 1) Nancy MNU 2) Pleasant MNU;

Private and Patriotic Service NC

2) The Powell Families of Virginia and the South, compiled by S. E. Lucas, lisrs Thomas

Powell as the immigrant ancestor. He is said to have come to North America before

  1. His children, as listed, were William Powell, born ca 1607 and Nathaniel

Powell, Sr.. Nathaniel was born ca 1610 in Isle of Wight County, VA, and died

ca 1678; he married Lucretia (MNU). Their son was Nathaniel Powell, Jr., who was

born ca 1650 in Isle of Wight County, VA, and married Mary (MNU); and their son

was Nathaniel Powell III, who was Dempsey Powell’s father. Nathaniel III was born

in Isle of Wight County, VA, and married Elizabeth (MNU). Their known children

were Jordan, William, Shadrack, Dempsey, Nathan, Sarah, Patsy, Jesse and Willis.

4) Mildred, born 1785, died 1845, married John Streeter. She came to Bedford County,

TN, with her children and settled on her division, which was located south of

Warner’s Bridge. Her son, John, married Susan Burt; her daughter, Cassie, married

Henry Shapard (their daughter was Cassie Streeter Shapard).

3) Elizabeth married Robert Temple of Wake County., NC. They came to Bedford

County and settled on her division of 201 acres which lay south of Sims Rd. near

Powell Creek School. In 1817, she sold this tract to John Sim

The Rose Family

Beginning with Tabitha Rose

Wife of Benjamin Davis

[See page 8]

NAME: Tabitha Rose

FATHER: John Rose

MOTHER: Abigail Hicks

DATE PLACE

BORN: Ca. 1752–1755

DIED: Before 1810 Brunswick County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Benjamin F. Davis 1 ca 1778-80 Brunswick County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William Davis

Elizabeth Davis 2

Benjamin Franklin Davis, Jr. 3 25 April 1784 VA

Martha Davis

Merritt Davis

Henry Davis 4 ca 1785-90 VA

Thomas Davis 4

John Davis

NOTES: 1) Emigration to Other States from Southside Virginia, Volume I, includes a copy of

Benjamin Franklin Davis’ April, 1817 will; all living children are listed in the will.

(Original is in Brunswick County, VA, Deed Book 24, page 52)

Benjamin Franklin Davis was the son of Henry Davis and Mary Marriott (see p. 7).

2) William, Elizabeth, Martha Merritt and John were living in Brunswick Co., VA,

at the time their father died in 1817.

Elizabeth married John Brown in Brunswick Co., VA, on 27 February 1800.

(Brunwick County Marriage Records, page 119)

3) Benjamin Franklin, Jr., moved, first, to GA land claimed by his father for service in

the GA militia during the Revolutionary War, and was living in Oglethorpe Co.,

GA, at the time his father died in 1817. In 1809, he sold part of that land. Later,

he moved to Autauga Co., AL. He married Martha Taylor, in 1816. Martha was the

daughter of Benjamin Taylor of Oglethorpe County, GA.

4) Henry and Thomas both moved to Bedford County, TN, about 1800-1810. When

their father’s will went to probate, they were represented by Peter Ragsdale, a

Bedford County TN attorney, and named, specifically as living in the County of

Bedford, State of Tennessee.” Both men are well docmented throughout their lives

in Bedford County.

37

NAME: John Rose

FATHER: William Rose

MOTHER: Lucy Corker

DATE PLACE

BORN: Ca. 1696 Surry County, VA

DIED: 1780 Brunswick County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Abigail Hicks 1 1728 Prob. Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: John Jr. 2 VA

Amy 3 VA

Martha 4 VA

Eleanor VA

Tabitha 5 ca. 1752-55 VA

William ca. 1756 VA

NOTES: 1) Abigail Hicks was the daughter of John Hicks and Rebekah Rebecca.

2) John Rose Jr., married Elizabeth Davis on January 28, 1775 (see p. 9); Elizabeth’s

brother, Benjamin F. Davis was a witness to John and Elizabeth’s marriage bond;

John and Elizabeth Rose’s son was Col. William Rose, born 1779.

3) Amy Rose married Mr. Williams.

4) Martha Rose married Thomas Sadler, II. Their child was William Rose Sadler

5) Tabitha Rose married Benjamin F. Davis, who was the brother of Elizabeth Davis

(see note 2 above; also see pages 8 and 37).

38

NAME: William Rose, Jr.

FATHER: William Rose

MOTHER: Ann

DATE PLACE

BORN: Ca. 1658 Surry County, VA

DIED: Unknown VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Lucy Corker 1 Ca. 1689 Southampton County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William 2 ca. 1691 Surry County, VA

Henry 3 ca. 1694 Surry County, VA

John 4 ca. 1696 Surry County, VA

Richard 5 1697 Surry County, VA

NOTES: 1) Lucy Corker was the daughter of ___ Corker and Lucy White.

2) William died 1766, Surry County; married 1) Frances Briggs, bef. 1730, Surry

County; 2) Elizabeth Goodrich Clinch, ca. 1755, Surry County

3) Henry died 1751, Brunswick County, VA; married Mary Tudor Tedder in May, 1721

4) John died 1780, Brunswick County, VA (see p. 34).

5) Richard died 1765, Southampton County, VA; wife’s name unknown; their children

were Robert, Mary and Burrell.

39

NAME: William Rose

FATHER: Unknown

MOTHER: Unknown

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1622 England or Scotland

DIED: ca. 1680 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Ann bef. 1650 England

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Jane 1 ca. 1653 Surry County, VA

Anne 2 ca. 1657 Surry County, VA

William 3 ca. 1658 Surry County, VA

Mary ca. 1660 Surry County, VA

Richard 4 ca. 1668 Surry County, VA

NOTES: 1) Jane Rose married 1) Richard Avery; and 2) Edward Booky, after 1685, in VA.

Her children were George Avery, William Avery, Thomas Avery and John Avery.

2) Anne Rose died March 1727/28 in Surry Co., VA. She married Thomas Flood

  1. 1678 in Surry County, VA. It is known that they had a daughter, Faith Flood.

3) William married Lucy Corker (see page 35).

4) Richard Rose died ca. 1736 in Surry County, VA. He married Elizabeth Sowerby

  1. 1689 in Virginia. Elizabeth was the daughter of Francis and Katherine Sowerby

Their children were Richard, Thomas, Anne and Jane.

40

The Sims Family

Beginning with Nancy Powell Sims

Wife of Henry Davis

[See page 7]

NAME: Nancy Powell Sims

FATHER: John Sims

MOTHER: Charlotte Powell

DATE PLACE

BORN: 18 November 1794 Wake County, NC

DIED: 18 August 1830 Bedford County, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Henry Davis

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: John Sims 15 Nov 1818 Bedford County, TN

Emily M. ca 1820 Bedford County, TN

Sarah Ann 27 Apr 1822 Bedford County, TN 4

Virginia P. 25 Oct 1825 Bedford County, TN

Mary R. ca 1826 Bedford County, TN

Charlotte S. ca 1828 Bedford County, TN

NOTES: 1) See page 7 for notes about the children of Nancy Sims and Henry Davis.

42

NAME: John Sims

FATHER: Leonard Henley Sims

MOTHER: Sarah Swepson

DATE PLACE

BORN: 1 Feb 1773 Warren County, NC

DIED: 1841 Bedford County, TN

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Charlotte Powell 4 30 Dec 1793 Wake County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Nancy Powell 5 18 Nov 1794 Wake County, NC

Leonard Powell 31 May 1797 Granville County, NC

Pleasant Benton 17 Feb 1799

John Swepson 20 Mar 1801

Richard Henry 6 1 Mar 1803 NC

James Lewis 11 Aug 1805

Sarah 12 Jun 1811

NOTES: 1) The 1800 Warren County, NC, census shows John Sims as 1 male between the ages

of 26-45, with 2 males under age 10, 1 female between the ages of 16-26 and

1 female under age 10 + 6 slaves

2) The 1810 Warren County, NC, ([. 314) census shows John Sims as 1 male over

age 45, with 1 male between ages 26-45 and 2 males between the ages of 10-16,

2 females between the ages of 26-45, 2 females between the ages of 10-16 and

2 females under age 10

3) The 1820 Bedford County TN census shows John Sims with 1 male over age

45, with 3 males between the ages 16-26 and 1 male between the ages of 16-18;

1 female over 45, 1 female under age 10 + 5 slaves

4) Charlotte and John Sims settled on part of the Powell tract in Bedford County, TN;

in later years, John bought additional land from some of Charlotte’s siblings,

according to Bedford County land records. Other Sims family members settled in

TN during this same period of time. Sims family Bible records show that Charlotte

Sims, wife of John Sims, died on 7 October 1837 in Rutherford County, TN.

5) Nancy Powell Sims married Henry Davis; they were the parents of John Sims Davis,

who married Frances Lenoir Burt (see page 6).

6) Richard Henry Sims married Jane (MNU) and lived in Bedford County, TN; one

of their children, William Edward “Ed” Sims, married Lucy Burt (see p. 20),

a sister of Frances Lenoir Burt, the wife of John Sims Davis and mother of

Benjamin Franklin Davis (see p. 5).

43

NAME: Leonard Henley Sims

FATHER: John Sims, Jr.

MOTHER: Sarah Bullock

DATE PLACE

BORN: 2 July 1739 Hanover County, VA

DIED: Nov 1804 Warren County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Sarah Swepson 3 12 Mar 1770 Mecklenburg County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Richard Swepson 4 4 Mar 1771

John 5 1 Feb 1773 Warren County, NC

Swepson 16 May 1775 ? VA

Leonard Henley

Thomas

Joseph

Henry 6 1790

Jane Langley 7

Susanna 8 17 Mar 1797 Granville County, NC

Sarah

NOTES*: 1) Leonard Henley Sims was named for his great-grandfather, Leonard Henley (or

Hendley). L.H. Sims served with the North Carolina troops during the American

Revolution and bought additional property in Warren County, NC, in 1787. In

both the 1790 and 1800 census of Warren County, NC, Leonard owned 36 slaves.

At his death in 1804, he owned more than 1,300 acres in Warren County. He was

a member of the Nut Bush Presbyterian Church.

2) Sims’ Revolutionary service can be found in # Vol XI, Book A, No. 11 P. 1323

Currency Certificates p.43 folio 2 781 Len. Sims $440.00 426 Len. Sims $1486.00

and NC Revolutionary Army Accounts [Treasurer. State] Book B [Part XIII]

3) Sarah Swepson was the daughter of Richard Swepson of Mecklenburg County, VA

(very close to Warren County, NC). She was born on 27 Oct 1752 and died on

14 June 1811. Richard Swepson is in the DAR Patriot Index: b. ca. 1735; d. before

2-?-1788 VA; m. 1) Unknown 2) Mrs. Mary Tabb; Patriotic Service VA

4) Richard married Rebecca Dromgoole of Brunswick County, VA, on 6 Mar 1799.

He became a doctor in Brunswick County. His son, Alexandria Dromgoole Sims,

was a congressman from South Carolina from 1845-1848, during the same period of

time in which his cousin, another Leonard Henley Sims, was also a congressman.

5) John Sims, son of Leonard Henley Sims, married Charlotte [Powell] and died in

1843.

6) Henry Sims married Salumith “Sallie” Burt, 29 Nov 1813, in Warren County, NC;

[see Burt section, p. 21]

7) Jane Langley Sims married her cousin, Jefferson Sims

8) Susanna Sims married William Burt on 3 Nov 1812; they were the parents of

Frances Lenoir Burt, who married John Sims Davis [see pp. 6 and 20]

* Most of these notes were copied from The Rev. R.J. Sims Family Genealogy by Larry J. Sims

  1. 1980. A copy of the research was sent to the DAR library by the author in 1982.

44

NAME: John Sims, Jr.

FATHER: John Sims, Sr.

MOTHER: Mary Rice

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca. 1713 Hanover County, VA

DIED: 1766 Granville County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Sarah Bullock ca. 1734 Hanover County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William 3 ca. 1736

Leonard Henley 3 2 July 1738

Elisha 3

Agness

Dorcas

Sarah

Susanna

Mary

Lucretia

Euphrates

NOTES*: 1) John moved to Granville County, NC, in 1752, where his brother Thomas lived.

He bought 800 acres on both sides of the Nut Bush Creek of Granville County

(now Warren County), NC, on 2 July 1752. He was a blacksmith during his

earlier days in Hanover County, VA.

2) Sarah was the daughter of Richard Bullock of Hanover County, VA, and was born

around 1720. Sarah’s sister, Susanna, married William Sims, son of Adam Symes

and cousin of John Sims, Jr.

3) William, Leonard Henley and Elisha remained in the vicinity of Granville County

for the rest of their lives and all three owned sizeable farms. William accumulated

at least 1,168 acres in Warren County, NC, during his lifetime.

* These notes were copied from The Rev. R.J. Sims Family Genealogy by Larry J. Sims ca. 1980.

A copy of the research was sent to the DAR library by the author in 1982.

45

NAME: John Sims, Sr.

FATHER: George Symes

MOTHER: Elizabeth Sherwood

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1690 VA

DIED: ca 1751 Hanover County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Mary Rice ca 1712 Hanover County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: John 1713 Hanover County, VA

Thomas 1715

Micajah 1720

David

Sherwood ca 1730

Edward

James

NOTES: 1) John Sims, with his brothers, Matthew and George, were granted 1,000 acres in

New Kent County in 1704. This property was originally claimed by their father,

George Symes. They were granted an additional 3,000 acres on Locust Creek on

16 January 1727. Among John, Matthew George and Edward, more than 5,000

acres near the present Hanover and Louisa County line were granted or purchased.

2) John Sims and his brothers names appear as as Sims rather than Symes.

* These notes were copied from The Rev. R.J. Sims Family Genealogy by Larry J. Sims ca. 1980.

A copy of the research was sent to the DAR library by the author in 1982.

46

NAME: George Symes

FATHER: George Symes

MOTHER: Dorothy Everard

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1672 Antigua, West Indies

DIED: ca 1733 Isle of Wight, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Elizabeth Sherwood ca 1689 VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Adam ca 1689

John ca 1690 VA

Matthew ca 1691

George

James

NOTES: 1) George emigrated to Isle of Wight County, VA, in 1687 and also lived in nearby

Surrey County. He had a land grant and was a planter.

2) Elizabeth Sherwood probably was the daughter of James and Grace Sherwood of

Lower Norfolk, VA.

* These notes were copied from The Rev. R.J. Sims Family Genealogy by Larry J. Sims ca. 1980.

A copy of the research was sent to the DAR library by the author in 1982.

47

NAME: George Symes

FATHER: Thomas Symes

MOTHER: Amy Bridges

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1651 Doynton, Gloucestershire

England

DIED: 1688 Antigua, West Indies

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Dorothy Everard 4

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: George ca 1672 Antigua, West Indies

John ca 1680

Elizabeth ca 1682

Christopher 1684

Henry

NOTES: 1) George Symes was probably born in Doynton, Gloucestershire, England, and

emigrated to Antigua, WI, in 1672, when his father received a grant of land there.

2) George was granted 260 acres in Antigua in 1681.

3) George was a member of the legislative assembly in 1681, and was speaker of the

assembly in 1688, when he died. He was a merchant and attained the title of

Captain, as did his younger brother, Henry.

4) Dorothy Everard was the daughter of Thomas Everard of Meath, Ireland, who

moved to St. Christopher, Kitts. After Thomas died, Dorothy’s mother married

John Vernon. After Dorothy’s marriage to George Symes, John Vernon gave them a

plantation called Wakering Hall in Old North Sound, Antigua. After George Symes

died, Dorothy married Arthur Freeman, Esq. of Antigua.

* These notes were copied from The Rev. R.J. Sims Family Genealogy by Larry J. Sims ca. 1980.

A copy of the research was sent to the DAR library by the author in 1982.

48

NAME: Thomas Symes

FATHER: John Symes

MOTHER: Amy Horner

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1605 Poundsford, Somersetshire

DIED: ca 1682 Poundsford, Somersetshire

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Amy Bridges ca 1634

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Thomas 2 1635

John 3

Edward 4 1645

Charles 5 1649

George 6 ca 1651

Henry 6 1653

William 7

Richard 8

Amy

Catherine

Elizabeth 9

NOTES: 1) Thomas Symes of Winterbourne, later of Poundsford, Gloucestershire, Esquire,

married Amy Bridges, daughter of Edward Bridges of Keynsham, Somersetshire.

Edward Bridges will is dated 7 November, proved 22 August 1639.

2) Thomas, Jr., matriculated from Christ Church College, Oxford, 21 April 1657.

Barrister of law at Lincoln’s Inn 1666. Died 22 November 1681; buried at Barwick.

Married Merriel, youngest daughter of Sir John Horner of Mells, County Kent.

3) John Symes of Montserrat was given the title of Captain and member of council in

  1. He died in 1687.

4) Edward Symes was baptized 1645, Doynton, Gloucestershire.

5) The Rev. Charles Symes matriculated from Magdalene Hall, Oxford, on 2 March

  1. He was the rector of Compton Martin, County Somerset in 1707. He

married Anne Creed of Salisbury on 21 Jan 1686.

6) Henry Symes was baptized 16 Nov 1653, at Doynton, Gloucestershire. He and his

brother, George, both emigrated to Antigua, West Indies, and both attained the title

of Captain. Henry was buried 9 July 1714 at St. John’s, Antigua. He married

Henrietta Yeamans.

7) William probably emigrated to New Kent County, VA, in 1677 and died there on

17 February 1725.

8) Richard Symes of Blackheath died 27 May 1728.

9) Elizabeth Symes of Doynton died a spinster in 1676 at Gloucester.

* These notes were copied from The Rev. R.J. Sims Family Genealogy by Larry J. Sims ca. 1980.

A copy of the research was sent to the DAR library by the author in 1982.

49

NAME: John Symes

FATHER: William Symes

MOTHER: Elizabeth Hill

DATE PLACE

BORN: 4 Mar 1571/1572 Chard, Somersetshire

DIED: 21 Oct 1661 Poundsford, Gloucestershire

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Amy Horner 2

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: John 3

Harry 4 1609

Thomas

Jane

Susan

Elizabeth 6

Katherine

Amy 5

Elinor

Dorothy

Edith

NOTES: 1) John Symes, Sr., matriculated at Exeter College, Oxford, with his brother, Henry,

on 23 February 1588, and received his degree on 9 July 1591. He was a member of

Somerset Parliament and a High Sheriff. He is buried at Frampton Cottrell Church,

County Gloucester. His will was dated 5 October 1658 and proved 19 December

1661.

2) Amy Horner was the daughter of Thomas Horner and Amy Popham of Mells.

Thomas Horner was a member of Parliament and the Sheriff of Somersetshire.

His son, Sir John Horner, was knighted and was the “Little Jack Horner” of nursery

rhymes, with sarcastic reference to the family having obtained lands formerly held

by the Abbott of Glastonbury.

3) John, Jr., married Abigail, daughter of Arthur Arscott of Tetcott, County Devon.

4) Harry married Amy Seymour. He died 25 May 1686, Framton Cottrell,

Gloucestershire. Student of Middle Temple 1628. Amy was the daughter of Sir John

Seymour of County Kent.

5) Amy married Sir John Seymour, County Kent.

6) Elizabeth Symes married Nicholas Martin of County Devon.

* These notes were copied from The Rev. R.J. Sims Family Genealogy by Larry J. Sims ca. 1980.

A copy of the research was sent to the DAR library by the author in 1982.

50

NAME: William Symes

FATHER: may be John Symes of Barwick

MOTHER: Unknown

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1540 England

DIED: 17 July 1597 Chard, Somersetshire

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Elizabeth Hill 3 ca 1570

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: John 4 Mar 1571/72 Chard, Somersetshire

Henry 4 ca 1573

Robert

William

James

Jane 5

Alice 6

Elizabeth 7

Mary 8

Margaret

Margery 9

NOTES: 1) William Symes, Sr., was very wealthy as evidenced by his will, which showed that

he owned eight manors, a mill and other property.

2) The Symes family in England can be traced by two documents: Visitation of

Somerset, 1623, and Oliver’s History of Antigua. The former documents the arms

and descendants of William Symes of Chard down to that date, 1623, based on

the visitation of Charenceux King at Arms to William Symes. The latter gives a

full genealogy of the Antigua Symes family. From these two documents, we know

that the Symes family had a coat of arms granted in 1591, which consisted of,

“Azure, three scallops in pale, or.” and a family crest of “a demi-kind, rampart and

erased, or.”

3) Elizabeth Hill was the daughter of Robert Hill. She was born and died in England.

4) Henry Symes of Poundsford matriculated at Exeter College, Oxford on 23 Feb

1588 at age thirteen; died unmarried in 1599.

5) Jane Symes married Roger Howe of London.

6) Alice Symes married William Hodges.

7) Elizabeth Symes married William Mallett.

8) Mary Symes married Robert Hendy.

9) Margery Symes married Jasper Pyne of Chard, County Somerset.

* These notes were copied from The Rev. R.J. Sims Family Genealogy by Larry J. Sims ca. 1980.

A copy of the research was sent to the DAR library by the author in 1982.

51

The Swepson Family

Beginning with Sarah Swepson

Wife of Leonard Henley Sims

[See page 44]

53

NAME: Sarah Swepson

FATHER: Richard Swepson

MOTHER: (probably) Jane Jeffries, possibly Dandridge

DATE PLACE

BORN: 27 Oct 1752 Amelia, VA

DIED: 14 June 1811 Warren County, NC

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Leonard Henley Sims 12 Mar 1770 Mecklenburg County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Richard Swepson 4 Mar 1771

John 1 Feb 1773

Swepson 16 May 1775 VA

Leonard Henley

Thomas

Joseph

Henry 1790

Jane Langley

Susanna 17 Mar 1797 Granville County, NC

Sarah

NOTES*: 1) See page 44 for notes about the children of Sarah Swepson and Leonard Henley

Sims

3) Sarah Swepson was born at Amelia Plantation in Amelia, VA.

NAME: Richard Swepson, Sr.

FATHER: Unknown

MOTHER: Unknown

DATE PLACE

BORN: ca 1720 ? Gloucester County, VA

DIED: ca 1788 Mecklenburg County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: 1) Jane Jeffries 6 ca 1746 VA

2) Mrs. Mary Mallory Tabb 12 Apr 1779 Mecklenburg County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: By his first wife, Jane Jeffries:

Mary Elizabeth 7 31 Mar 1747 ? Amelia County, VA

Ann 7 22 Jan 1750 Amelia County, VA

Sarah 7 27 Oct 1752 Amelia County, VA

Richard, Jr. 7 7 Mar 1756 Amelia County, VA

John 7 19 Jul 1759 Amelia County, VA

Jane 7 14 Apr 1762 Amelia County, VA

Thomas 7 25 Feb 1765 Amelia County, VA

Susannah 7 19 Dec 1767 Amelia County, VA

By his second wife, Mary Tabb:

Lucy 7 19 Mar 1780 Mecklenburg County, VA

Charity 7 16 Nov 1781 Mecklenburg County, VA

William Mallory 7 7 Apr 1783 Mecklenburg County, VA

NOTES: 1) Richard Swepson resided for a time in Amelia County, Va., where he purchased

718 acres from Philemon and w/Ann Holcomb, on July 21, 1749, including all

houses, etc. This plantation was on the Lower side of Briery River. He appears in

the 1751, 1752, 1753 Amelia County Tax List—Nottoway Parish. In 1753-54

Prince Edward County was cut off from Amelia Co., placing his plantation,

“Linden,” in the newly created county of Prince Edward. He sold 318 acres of this

plantation on April 14, 1761 to Thomas Carlton of Lunenburg Co, and the

remaining 400 acres Richard Swepson sold to James Zachery, of Pr. Edward Co.,

on May 10, 1762. This plantation is located about 3.8 miles north of present day

Meherrin, Va. Prince Edward County joins Lunenburg Co.

2) Richard’s name appears on the 1752 Tax List for Lunenburg County, but he did

not own any land there at the time. He purchased about 580 acres in Lunenburg

Co. from Samuel and Elizabeth Phelps on July 1, 1760, located on S. Fork of

Allen’s Creek, and this is the land for which he was taxed in the 1764 List. On

that same date, John Jeffries purchased an adjoining plantation, of about 531 acres

from William and Sarah Phelps.

54

55

3) Richard Swepson first appears in the Lunenburg Court records in 1753, and he is

mentioned often, either as a member of the Jury, as well as other miscellaneous

duties, and a few times as a defendant himself. The first mention of his wife, Jane,

is in the court records of 1757.

4) Richard Swebson (Swepson) received a Land grant on May 29, 1760 of 404 acres

on both sides of Little Falling River, Lunenburg Co. (Bk 33, P 797) And he

received a Land Patent of 1, 326 Acres on Feb. 14, 1761, on both sides of N. Fork

of Sandy River in Lunenburg Co., for the sum of six pounds, fifteen shillings.

(Bk 33, P 1000)

5) During the American Revolution, Richard Swepson, Sr., his son, Richard, Jr., and

his son John, served their country well; Richard, Sr., by furnishing many supplies,

Richard, Jr. as Captain of the 2 Btn. of Militia, and John served on the Committee

of Safety for Mecklenburg Co., as well as furnishing supplies.

6) Richard Swepson, Sr., was married at least twice. The only primary source information

known about the name of his wife before 1779 may be found in deed records

and court orders. Existing court orders and deeds from Lunenburg and Mecklenburg

counties between 1757 and 1774 show the given name of his wife as Jane. The

maiden name of Mrs. Jane Swepson has been the subject of considerable speculation,

and is often given as Dandridge or Jeffries. No substantiation for either is known,

but due to the names of the descendants, it is more likely her maiden name was

Jeffries. Richard Swepson’s wife, Jane, apparently died between 1774 and April 12,

1779, when he married Mrs. Mary (Mallory) Tabb (widow of John Tabb) in

Mecklenburg County. Mary Mallory Tabb Swepson died October, 1783 Meck. Co,

Va. Ref: Tabb Family Records, W&M Qrtrly, 26-27, P 202-204

7) The children of Richard Swepson married:

  • Mary Elizabeth married Benjamin Whitehead on 31 Mar 1761
  • Ann married Alexander Boyd about 1766
  • Sarah married Leonard Henley Sims on 12 Mar 1770
  • Richard, Jr., did not marry
  • John is believed not to have married
  • Jane married John Young on 24 Jan 1784
  • Thomas married a Miss Davis ca 1789 (see 8, below)
  • Susannah married John Davis, Jr. on 28 Mar 1785
  • Lucy married John Speed on 26 Jan 1801
  • Charity did not marry
  • William Mallory married 1) Elizabeth Speed on 27 Mar 1807 and 2) Nancy Redd

on 12 Jun 1816

Note: All birth dates for the children of Richard Swepson were taken from the

Boyd family Bible record in the Library of VA manuscript collection.

There is extensive documentation and a list of sources concerning Richard Swepson

online at: http://home.inu.net/sadie/rswepson.htm

The Warren Family

Beginning with Elizabeth Warren

Wife of James Davis, Sr.

[See page 10 ]

NAME: Elizabeth Warrem

FATHER: Thomas Warren, Jr.1

MOTHER: Elizabeth (MNU)

DATE PLACE

BORN:

DIED:

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: James Davis, Sr.1 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: Thomas 2

Jane 2 Surry County, VA

John 2 Surry County, VA

James 2 Surry County, VA

Henry 2 Surry County, VA

Robert 2 Surry County, VA

Nathaniel 2 Surry County, VA

Anne 2 Surry County, VA

NOTES: 1) Virginia Historical Genealogies, by John Bennett Boddie, includes chapters on both

the Davis (beginning on pg. 255) and Warren (beginning on pg. 244) families

2) Thomas Davis died 1848; lived Isle of Wight County, VA.

Jane Davis married a Warren.

John Davis may have moved to Brunswick County, VA.

James Davis died 1783; lived Surry County, VA; married Elizabeth Baldwin.

Henry Davis died 1767; lived Surry County, VA; married Mary Marriott.

Robert Davis died 1749; lived Pasquotank County, NC; married Sarah ?Chapman.

Nathaniel Davis may have moved to Hyde County, NC

Anne Davis married James Nicholson ca. 1740; their son, also named James,

married Elizabeth Woodruff.

All children listed above were named in the will. There may have been other

children who died unmarried and before their parents.

57

58

NAME: Thomas Warren, Jr.

FATHER: Thomas Warren.1

MOTHER: Jane (3rd wife of Thomas Warren)

DATE PLACE

BORN: 9 January 1659 Surry County, VA

DIED: 1721 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: Elizabeth 2 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: William

John Surry County, VA

Joseph Surry County, VA

Robert Surry County, VA

Elizabeth Surry County, VA

NOTES: 1) Virginia Historical Genealogies, by John Bennett Boddie, includes chapters onthe

Warren family (beginning on pg. 244).

2) Thomas Warren Jr.’s will was probated 16 August 1721. (Bk. 5, p. 362)

Elizabeth Warren’s will was make in 1724, and probated in 1730. (Bk. 8, p. 80)

All children listed above were named in both Thomas’ and Elizabeth’s wills,

In addition, the following grandchildren were named in Elizabeth’s will: Thomas

Warren, Mary Warren and James Davis.

All children listed above were named in the will. There may have been other

children who died unmarried and before their parents.

59

NAME: Thomas Warren

FATHER: Believed to be William Warren of Ripple Court, Kent, England 1

MOTHER: Believed to be Catherine Gookin

DATE PLACE

BORN: 1623/24 England

DIED: Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

MARRIED: 1) Unknown

2) Elizabeth Spencer Shepard 2 1654 Surry County, VA

3) Jane 3 bef. 1659 Surry County, VA

NAME DATE PLACE

CHILDREN: By his first wife:

William 4 Surry County, VA

Alice 5 ca. 1640 Surry County, VA

By his second wife, Elizabeth Spencer Shepard:

Elizabeth 6 Surry County, VA

By his third wife, Jane:

Thomas, Jr. 7 9 Jan 1659 Surry County, VA

Allen 1663 Surry County, VA

Robert 1667 Surry County, VA

William 1669/70 Surry County, VA

NOTES: 1) Virginia Historical Genealogies, by John Bennett Boddie, includes chapters onthe

Warren family (beginning on pg. 244).

2) Thomas Warren’s second wife was the daughter of William Spencer and the widow

of Major Robert Shepard.

3) Jane and Thomas Warren were married before 1659, as that is the year Thomas

Warren, Jr., their oldest child, was born.

4) William was granted probate of his father’s will April 21, 1670; he died before

24 September 1670.

5) Alice married Matthias Marriott. His will, probated 2 September 1707, listed their

children: William Marriott, Margaret Flake, Elizabeth Hill and Marion Chips.

Their son William married Sarah Collier before 16 November 1725; their daugter,

Mary Marriott, married Henry Davis (died 1767; see page 8).

6) Elizabeth married John Hunnicutt

7) Thomas, Jr., married Elizabeth; they were the parents of Elizabeth Warren Davis.

2 Comments »

I am looking to connect Alvin Lester Davis to Scotland or England “HELP”

coat and tie

 

 

This is me Alvin Lester Davis

 

William Davis of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

c154 WILLIAM DAVIS: b. near Philadelphia, 1756; had two brothers, Henry and Jonas; served in the Revolutionary War for four yrs.; in 1784 m. Isabella Scott; had with other issue (1) Henry: b. 1787; d. 1860; m. Jane Johnston; was a sergeant in Capt. Leiper’s Company in War of 1812….

Samuel Davis of Bucks County, Pennsylvania

L127 SAMUEL DAVIS: b. 1669 in County Tyrone, Ireland; d. 1758 in Bucks County, Pa. (1) James: b. 1699; near Drumquin, Ireland; m. Eliza Jennings; both died in Bucks County, Pa. Founder of the American Branch. 6 ch. (A) William: b. 1730 near Drumquin; m. Mary Means; served in the…

Dolar Davis of Cambridge, Massachusetts

F114 DOLAR DAVIS: came to America from the county of Kent, England, 1634. Settled at Cambridge, Mass. He was b. 1593; d. 1673; m. (1), Margery Willard, 1624, and m. (2), Joanna Bursley. (1) John: b. 1626. (2) Simon: b. 1636; d. 1713; Lieut. of militia; in command of Concord…

Thomas Davis of Maryland

G115 THOMAS DAVIS: (the elder), came to America from Wales. Settled in Maryland sometime after 1600. The founder of the Davises of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Md. He m. Mary Pierpont and had eleven ch. including: (1) Thomas, Jr.: b. Feb. 1704; m. Elizabeth Gaither; d. 1749. Ch include:…

William Davis of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

a152 WILLIAM DAVIS: m. Rebecca (?) and settled in Cumberland Co., Pa. Had with other issue (1) James D.: b. 1775; d. 1857; m. Susan McClintock. (A) William: b. 1801; m. Harriet Parr. (a) Elizabeth. (b) James: m. Emma McLaren. (c) Ruth D.: m. Willard Harsh. (d) William: b. 1861;…

 

Sir John Davis of Hollywood, Glouestershire, England

B107 SIR JOHN DAVIS: 1st Bart.; K. C. B.; of Hollywood, Co. Gloucester; D.C.L. Oxford; F.R.S.; sometime H.M. plenipotentiary in China; gov. and comm-in-chief in Hongkong; b. 1795; created bart., 1845; m (1) 1822, Emily (dau. of Lieut-Col. Richard Hurnfravs, Bengal, India) (1) Sullivan Francis: acting judge, Arrah, Bengal; b. 1827; m. 1861, Agnes Maria (dan. Capt. John Forhes-Middleton); (d.s.p.v.p., 1862. (2) Henrietta Anne: d. unm., 1909. (3) Emily Nowell: b. 1823; m. 1851, Rev. D. A. Beaufort. Issue. (4) Florence: m. 1863, Lieut-Col.; J. B. Lind, Bengal, N. I.; d. 1914; issue. m. (2) 1867, Lucy Ellen (dau. Rev. T. J. Rocke, vicar of Exmouth); d. 1890. (1) Francis Baileau (Sir): 2nd and last Bart.; b. 1871; m. 1891, Ella Alice (dau. Ed. Lockwood, of Kingham, Chipping Norton); d.s.p., 1896; baronetcy became extinct.

Davis of Bryn-Derwen

C108 DAVID DAVIES: of Blaengwawr, Aberdare; m. Mary (dau. of Lewis); d. 1867.

C109 LEWIS DAVIS: of Bryn-Derwen; m. 1858, Mary Ann (dau. Thomas Cross, of Bryn-Hyrfryd); d. 1888.

C110 THE LATE FREDERICK LEWIS DAVIS: B.A.; LL.B., Camb; of Bryn­-Derwen, Co. Glamorgan; J. P. and County Alderman; High Sheriff, 1890; Barrister-at-Law; b. 1863; m. 1889, Helen Brydie (dau. Rob’t Smith, of Brentham Park, Stirling); d. 1920. (1) Lewis Frederick: b. 1891. (2) Alistair Jeffries: b. 1900.

Davis of Swerford Park

D111a SAMUEL DAVIS: Esq. of Swerford; d. 1874.

D112b ROBERT SNOW BOLTON DAW5: Esq. of Swerford Park, Co. Oxford, J. P., and Lord of the Manor of Swerford; m. Sophia Perkins. (1) Sophia Louisa Bolton: b. 1866; m. Sir Charles Simeon King, Bart. of Corrard.

Davis of Pictou, Nova Scotia, Canada

1164 DAVIS: b. in Pictou, Nova Scotia; was a carpenter and d. 1895, when about 73 yrs. of age. He m. and his son 1165 WILIAM W. DAVIS: b. in Nova Scotia, 1844; m. Elizabeth Leadley. Their son

l166 CHARLES DAVIS: b. in Hartford, Conn., 1878; m. Lillian Roulston. They reside at 54 Clermont St., Hartford, and have a son

l167 RUSSELL EDWARD DAVIS: b. in Conn. Mar., 1905. He is a professor in Chateau du Rosey, Rolle, Switzerland.

David and Ellen Davis of Cardiff, Wales

i161 DAVID DAVIS: was b. at Cardiff, Wales, 1818, d. 1891, m. Ellen Hans and had the following:

(1) William: b. at Cardiff, 1836. He was a land owner, who m. Helen Phillips in 1860. She was b. at Tree Forest, Wales. They had: (A) Charles E.: b. 1868. (B) Davis A.: b. 1865. (C) Frederick H.: b. 1863. He and bros. were b. at Cardiff.

Frederick m. Elizabeth Smallwood and had: (a) Hans W.: m. Myrtle Reynolds. (b) Edith S.: m. Joseph Felzien. (c) Charles E.: m. Gladys Neuberg. (d) Albert: b. 1890, in Nebr. Educated Un. of Omaha, 1919; Creighton Un. 1911; Un. of Nebr. 1921, receiving degrees of B.Sc., D.D.S., M.D. and honorary degree granted in 1926, Fellow of the Am. Coil, of Dentistry. Mr. Davis practices oral and plastic surgery in San Fran­cisco. He is a mem. Of several fraternities, and honorary societies.

(2) Reuben. (3) Alfred. (4) Edward.

 

CHARLES DAVIS: (d. 1755); bookseller and publisher; one of the first to issue priced catalogues of second-hand books.

DAVID: (1745—1827); Welsh poet; conducted school at Castle Howel, 1785; translated Scougall’s “Life of God in the Soul of Man” into Welsh.

DAVID DANIEL: (1777—1841); physician; M.D., Glasgow, 1801; attended the Duchess of Kent at the birth of Queen Victoria, 1819.

EDWARD: (1835—1867); subject painter; first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1854; died in Rome.

HENRY EDWARDS: (1756—1784); opponent of Gibbon; B.A. Balliol College; priest, 1780; fellow and tutor of Balliol, 1780.

HENRY GEORGE: (1830—1857); topographer; left in manuscript “Memor­ials of the Hamlet of Knightsbridge” (1859), and ‘On Account of Pimlico”.

JAMES: (d. 1755); Welsh satirist; M.A., Jesus College, Oxford, 1729; MB, 1732; published a satire on the contemporary school of etymologists.

JOHN: (d. 1622); navigator; made voyage to the East Indies as pilot and captain; captured by the Dutch at Pularoon, 1617; released 1618; died at Batavia, 1622.

  1. P. (called “Pope” Davis): (d. 1862); painter; called “Pope” from his picture of the “Talbot Family Receiving the Benediction of the Pope”; painted at Rome; exhibited at the Royal Academy, 1811—43.

JOHN BUNNELL: (1780—1824); physician; imprisoned at Montpellier and Verdun at Bonaparte; M.D. Edinburgh, 1803; physician to troops invalided home from Walcheren.

JOHN FORD: (1773—1864); physician; M.D., Edinburgh, 1797; L.R.C.P., 1808; physician to the General Hospital, Bath, 1817—54.

SIR JOHN FRANCIS: (1795—1890); diplomatist; writer in East India Company’s factory at Canton; joint commissioner in China with Lord Napier, commander-in-chief at Hongkong, 1844—8; published works on China.

JOSEPH BARNARD: (1801—1881); craniologist; surgeon on an Arctic whaler; 1820; M.C.S., 1843; chief work “Crania Britannica”, 1865.

LOCKYER: (1719—1791); bookseller; nephew of Charles; member of the booksellers’ club which produced Johnson’s, “Lines of the Poets”, 1788.

MARY: (fl. 1663—1669); actress in the company of Sir William D’Avenant, 1660; performed in various plays by Etherege, Dryden, and Shirley; frequently mentioned by Pepys as a dancer and court beauty.

NATHAN: (1812—1882); traveler and excavator; resided in an Old Moorish palace near Tunes; engaged on behalf of the British Museum in excavation at Carthage and Utica, 1856—8.

RICHARD BARRETT: (1782—1854); animal painter; exhibited at the Royal Academy (1802—53); animal painter to William IV, 1831.

THOMAS OSB0RN: (1814—1845); poet and politician; graduated at Trinity College, 1836; developed Young Ireland party out of the extremists who were dissatisfied with O’Connell’s methods.

WILLIAM: (1771—1807); mathematician and editor of the “Companion of the Gentlemen’s Diary”; bookseller and publisher; wrote or edited works on fluxions.

WILLIAM: (1812—1873); landscape and portrait painter; professor of painting, Liverpool Academy; exhibited landscapes at the Royal Academy, 1851—72.

E112 JAMES DAVIS: B. about 1584. He came to New England as early as 1634 and was one of the original settlers of Hampton, 1638. Removed to Haverhill, 1646, being one of the twelve who petitioned the General Court for authority to settle at Pentucket where they founded the present city of Haverhill, Mass. His son

E113 JOHN DAVIS: b. in Gloucestershire, England, 1621; m Jane Peasley. In 1650 he was on a committee to lay out a boundary between Haverhill and Salisbury. About 1653 he went to Oyster River where he settled near Davis Creek. Had numerous grants of land, was selectman seven times, constable, surveyor of lands. Called ensign as early as 1662. Ch. include:

(1) Sarah: b. 1649; m. James Smith; killed by Indians, 1694. (2) John: b. 1651. He and his wife and several ch. were killed in the Massacre of 1694 and two daus. were carried as captives to Canada. (3) Moses: b. 1657; m. Reuhamah Dow, 1681. He was a private, under his brother, Capt. James Davis in a scout against the Indians in 1712 and he and his son, Moses, were killed by the redskins in 1724. (A) John: b. 1682; m. Abigail Meader. Ch. include: (a) John: m. Judith (?) about 1797. (b) Nathaniel: b. 1716; m. Hannah Davis. 1. John: bapt. 1746. 2. Elijah: bapt. 1750. 3. Solomon. 4. George. 5. Lemuel. 6. Eleazer: b. 1742. In 1771 m. Sarah Cook. Ch. include: A. Hezekial: m. (?) Nutter B. Eleazer: m. Polly Sanborn. His son m. Ann Waldron, 1846. C. John: m. Mercy McDuffee. D. Nathaniel: b. 1777; m. (1), Mary Stevens, (2), Clarissa Gordon. 12 ch. a. Stevens: b. 180~; m. 1827, Satira Crowell; had a large family. b. Franklin: b. 1804; m. Emily Gilmore, 1827. c. Seth F.: b. 1806; m. Charlotte Heal and had James H. (b. 1843), Frank (b. 1852). d. John: b. 1808; m. (1), Rhoda Merrill, (2), Rhoda Maxfield; had a large family. e. Eleazer: b. 1810; d. 1886. f. Charles: b. 1825; m. Esther Sargent. He d. 1890.

(B) Moses: B. 1686; m. and had among others: (a) Moses: m. Elizabeth Davis. Had Aaron (who in 1776m. Susannah Otis), Elisha (who settled in New Durham), Elizabeth (who m. Paul Demeritt), Lois and Martha (who m. Jonathan Woodman). (B) James: B. about 1687; m. (1), Mary Stevenson, (2), Elizabeth Dunn; had Mary, bapt. 1726 and Samuel, bapt. 1729. (c) Solomon: b. about 1695; m. Elizabeth Davis. (d) Jabez: b. about 1701; m. Abigail Willey. (e) Ebenezer: b. 1702; m. and had Solomon, B. 1755 (in. Temperance Colbath) and Timothy, bapt. 1755. (f) Aaron: d. unm. before 1772. (4) Joseph: b. 1660; m. Mary Stevens. Lieut, 1712 and was a con­stable in 1714. He had four daus. and one son, Benjamin, who m. Miriam Roberts.

(5) James: b. 1662; m. Elizabeth Chesley; was a colonel.

(A) James: b. 1689; m. Ruth Ayer, (2), Elizabeth Payne. He had two daus. and James, b. 1744; Daniel, b. 1748; Thomas, b. 1750, m. Joanna Keating; and John, b. 1754.

(B) Samuel: b. 1692; m. Martha Chesley.

(a) Samuel: b. 1720; m. Abigail (?).

  1. Moses: d. about 1769; had two ch.
  2. Eleazer: bapt. 1743; m. Keziah Langley.

(b) Eleazer: b. 1722.

(c) James: b. 1724 and d. 1752.

(d) Thomas: b. 1732; m. (1), Elizabeth Roberts, (2), Abigail Jones.

(C) Daniel: b. 1695.

(a) Obadiah: b. 1764; m. Deborah Lord and had Frank, Sarah and Obadiah.

(b) Thomas: b. 1748; m. Sally Drew. Served in Revolution. Settled in Maine and had John (b. 1784), Bradstreet (b.

1786) and Samuel (b. about 1790).

(c) Francis: bapt. 1752. A blacksmith of Yarmouth, Me.

(D) Ephraim: b. 1704; m. Ruth (?). Selectman in Durham, 1743.

(a) James: b. 1734, m. Elizabeth Durgin (?).

(b) Ephraim: b. 1739. In 1764 he m. Lois Drew and had one d au.

(c) Josiah: b. 1743.

(E) Eleazer: b. 1709 and d. 1748.

 

F114 DOLAR DAVIS: came to America from the county of Kent, England,

  1. Settled at Cambridge, Mass. He was b. 1593; d. 1673; m. (1),

Margery Willard, 1624, and m. (2), Joanna Bursley.

(1) John: b. 1626.

(2) Simon: b. 1636; d. 1713; Lieut. of militia; in command of Concord men at the Brookfield fight with Indians, 1675. He m. Mary Blood, 1660.

(A) James: b. 1668; d. 1727; farmer of Concord; m. Anne Smedley, 1700.

(a) Thomas: b. 1705; d. 1786; farmer of Concord; captain of militia and selectman, 1762; m. Sarah Jones, 1725.

  1. Josiah: b. 1750; d. 1815; farmer; served during Revolu­tion. In 1772 m. Abigail Hubbard (1754—1844).
  2. Charles: b. 1797; d. 1865; Trader at Concord and inspector in Boston Custom House. In 1829 m

Lucy Hunt, dau. of a Revolutionary soldier.

  1. Charles Wilder: b. 1833; d. 1898. Adjutant in 51st Ill. Infantry, becoming Colonel in 1865.

Provost Marshall General, Dept. of Missouri, 1864. Present at many engagements and received surrender of General Thompson in

Northern Arkansas. In 1870 he m. Emma Moore, dau. of a prominent horticulturist of Concord.

(I) Bradley Moore: b. 1871. Add: 2015 Geddes Ave., Ann Arbor, Mich. [See Ch. (J)].

(B) Simon: m. Elizabeth Woodhouse. Had, with other issue (a) Simon: m. Phoebe Aldrich. Had, with other issue

  1. Simon: b. 1759; d. 1842; served in Revolutionary War; m. Mary Fuller and among others had a son, Silas, b. 1780, d. 1860; m. Phoebe Bennett and had twelve ch. including:
  2. William B.: b. 1810, d. 1891; m. Martha Haywood. Their son
  3. Byron B.: b. 1859; is practicing surgery in Omaha, Nebr., at the Medical Arts Bldg. He m. Florence Eaton Davis, who is also a direct descendant of Dolor Davis.

(3) Samuel: b. 1640; m. Mary Meaddowes.

(A) Samuel: b. 1669.

(B) Daniel: b. 1673.

(C) Stephen: b. 1686.

(D) Simon: m. Dorothy Heald.

(a) Simon: 2d, b. 1714; m. Hannah Gates.

  1. David: b. 1740.
  2. Simon: b. 1744.
  3. Isaac: b. 1749; m. Anna Brigham, (2), Mrs. Susannah Harrington.
  4. Phineas: b. 1772; m. Martha Eager.
  5. Francis: b. 1794; m. Martha Parmenter.
  6. Isaac: b. 1799; m. Mary Holman Easterbrook. c. Phineas: b. 1801; m. Abagail Thayer.
  7. William: b. 1803; m. Almira L. Sherman.
  8. Andrew J.: b. 1815.
  9. Joseph: b. 1774; m. Lydia Ball; m. (2), Lydia Cogswell.
  10. Joseph: b. 1800; m. Mary Wood.
  11. John B.: b. 1808; m. Harriet Porter Gates.
  12. George C.: b. 1813; d. 1873; m. Mary E. Bigelow.
  13. James: b. 1818; d. 1893; m. Lucy Allen.
  14. Isaac: b. 1779; d. 1859; m. Polly Rice.
  15. Henry Cassett: b. 1807; d. 1896; m. Ellen W. Deering.
  16. Isaac Brigham: b. 1809; d. 1832.
  17. John: b. 1813; d. 1844. d. Cyrus: b. 1822; d. 1855.
  18. Samuel: b. 1784, d. 1852; m. Mrs. Elizabeth God­frey.
  19. Samuel B.: b. 1811, d. 1896; m. Mary Ann Stain.
  20. Henry: b. 1814; d. 1889; m. Susan Baker.
  21. James G.: b. 1820; d. 1900; m. Polly Robinson.
  22. John: b. 1787; d. 1854; m. Eliza Bancroft.
  23. John Chandler: b. 1822, d. 1907.
  24. George Henry: b. 1824.
  25. Bruyn Hasbrouck: b. 1827; Brig.-Gen. in Civil War.
  26. Horace: b. 1831; mem. of Congress.
  27. Andrew McFarland: b. 1833. S.B., Harvard Coil.

(b) Israel: b. 1717.

(c) Joseph: 1). 1720.

  1. Samuel: b. 1751.
  2. John: b. 1752.

 

G115 THOMAS DAVIS: (the elder), came to America from Wales. Settled in

Maryland sometime after 1600. The founder of the Davises of Anne

Arundel and Howard Counties, Md. He m. Mary Pierpont and had

eleven ch. including:

(1) Thomas, Jr.: b. Feb. 1704; m. Elizabeth Gaither; d. 1749. Ch include:

(A) Amos: b. 1747; mem. of the Committee of Observation, Arundel Co., 1775.

(B) Ephraim: b. 1736—7; m. Elizabeth Howard. Their son

(a) Thomas: b. 1768; m. Elizabeth Bowie, 1802. Served as officer of a company that went to Penna., 17.94. to quell Whiskey Insurrection; often a delegate to General Assembly, and one of the Council to the Governor. Their son

  1. Allen Bowie: b. 1809, was a delegate to the convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church, pres. Brooke­ville Academy, pres. Board of Agricultural Coil, and was elected to the Legislature. He m. Rebecca Comfort, dau. of Chief Justice Thomas Dorsey.
  2. Thomas: b. 1840; d. 1889.
  3. Win. Wilkins: b. 1842; d. 1866.
  4. Rebecca: b. 1843.
  5. Mary Dorsey: b. 1845. She is the only surviving dau. of Allen.
  6. Esther Wilkins: b. 1849.

(2) Robert: m. Ruth Gaither. He was a vestryman in Queen Caroline’s parish, 1750. Lived near Woodstock, Md.

(A) Nicholas: m. and had one son, John. (B) Ely.

(C) Robert: He had Richard, defender of Baltimore, 1814.

(D) Thomas.

(E) Ichabod.

(F) Caleb: m. Louisa Riggs.

(a) John D.

(b) Henry: b. 1823.

(c) Win. R.

(3) Richard: m. Ruth Warfield, 1725, d. 1743.

(A) Col. Richard: He and members of his family, made brilliant and distinguished records in Revolutionary War. Their names are found in many of the old records, letters and orders of the period.

(a) Capt. Richard: b. 1748; d. 1801; m. and had Elizabeth. Rezin and William.

(b) Amos.

(c) Rezin: b. 1753; d. 1800; m. and had a family.

(d) Darius.

(e) Dennis.

(f) Isaac: b. 1783; d. 1850; m. Kezia Askew; Ch. include:

  1. Albert G.: b. 1805; m. Mary Rodiffer; had, with other issue
  2. Isaac: m. and had 6 ch.
  3. Silas: m. and had Gene who m. Edna Slocum.

(g) Albinus: b. 1765; m. Sarah Carter. In 1797 he purchased a farm at Elm Grove, XV. Va., where some of his descend­ants still live.

  1. Richard: d. in Ohio.
  2. John R.: had five sons and one dau.

3 Arthur D.: had four daus.

  1. Cephas: b. 1798; m. Elizabeth Robinson; settled at Elm Grove.
  2. John R.: m. Katherine Brown, 1869. They had Adella who is m. and living at Pasadena, Calif., and John R.
  3. Richard C.: b. 1835 at Elm Grove; m. Margaret Keyser; settled in Illinois. Among their ch. were:
  4. John Calvin: b. 1861; m. Edna Scott. He d. 1927.

(I) Margaret: b. 1895; m. Claud Young and has Donald.

(II) Charlotte: lives in Calif. and has two daus. (III) Philip: b. 1899. Resides at 371 Salem St., Glendale, Calif.

(IV) Donald Carter: b. 1901. Graduate of University of Kansas. He m. in 1928.

  1. James Oliver: b. 1861. Graduated from Univ. of Ill. He m. Rozina Fairchild, and lives at

2119 S. Ryan St., Lake Charles, La.

(I) Elmer: b. 1887. Instructor in Univ. of Calif.; geologist in New Mexico; m. Grace

Murphy, 1910. They have one dau.

(II) Richard Henry: m. Florence Lathrop and

had Richard, d. y., and Russell, b. 1926.

(111) John Oliver: b. 1892; m. Ruth Wilson.

They have Helen, b. 1918; John, b. 1921,

and Phebe, b. 1923.

(IV) Elbert: b. 1894. Admitted to the bar,

  1. He m. Alice Kingman. They have

Kenneth, b. 1918, Gertrude, b. 1920, and

Keith, b. 1923.

  1. William: b. 1862; m Nettie Wasson. Live in Kansas.
  2. Elmer: b. 1864. One dau. who m. Richard Ryder.
  3. Elbert: b. 1870; m. May Armstrong. Lives in Chicago.

(I) John: b. 1903; m Florence Smith and has Richard, b. 1924.

(II) Hugh: b. 1910.

  1. Cephas: b. 1837; m. Dorothy Arkle, 1863. They had Cephas, b. 1865, and now living in Benwood, W. Va.
  2. Arthur C.: b. 1840; d. y.
  3. James W.: b. 1842; d. 1911; m. Mary Kimmons.
  4. Charley: b. 1868, m. Mary Henderson and had Carrol, d. y. and Wilbur, b. 1897.
  5. Erastus: b. 1871 and lives at Elm Grove.
  6. Ralph: b. 1876. He m. Lizzie Butler and has Jesse, b. 1900.

 

Davis Family History

The Davis family is among the forty-nine “best families” selected by the American Historical-Genealogical Society for whom the Society has published family histories during the past few years. The Davis family has been prominent in the British Empire and in the United States, its members having played important roles in war and in peace. Family pride is a commendable trait and should be cultivated. All Davises have just cause to be proud of their family history and traditions.

In references No. 7 and No. 14 we find the following regarding the origin and meaning of the name Davis.

Davis is a Welsh surname, and the family is among the most numerous in England and Wales. This is due to the fact that there are so many varia�tions of the name. The original name was David which signifies well-beloved�popular in Biblical days and a favorite among the Scottish kings.

Though of ancient standing in Wales, David scarcely appears in England before the Conquest. Modified in various forms, it has produced many family names such as Davis, Davidson, Davies, Daves, Dawson, Dawes, Day, Dakin, etc. The Irish form is M�Daid; the French, Devis.

The data in this volume is gathered from reliable sources. We have selected what we consider the most important material. Many of the daughters, and sons for whom no issue was shown, have been omitted from the pedigrees. A missing symbol indicates that a name has been omitted. Those desiring further information are advised to consult the volumes mentioned in the list of References.

The compilers hope that, in producing this volume they are bringing to the Davis family information which will be of interest and value to them, and that they are rendering an important service to the public. They and their associates will be glad to give their cooperation to members of the family who are interested in having a complete genealogy of the family published.

Unless otherwise plainly shown, the persons in this volume whose names are accompanied by three figures are children of the immediately preceding persons bearing immediately preceding numbers. All persons in each group bearing the same letter as a part of their numbers, are directly related. The generations of the descendants of those bearing numbers of three figures are represented as follows. However, some of our material is published as copied from various records without rearrangement according to this system.

Generations 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th Symbols (1), etc. (A), etc. (a), etc. 1, etc. A, etc. Generations 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th Symbols a, etc. (I), etc. (i), etc. I, etc. i, etc.

Abbreviations Used in this Manuscript

Address = add Born = b Children = ch
College = coll Died = d Died young = d.y.
Died without issue = d.w.i. died before father = d.v.p. died without issue = d.s.p.
daughter = dau graduated = grad married, moved = m
son, succeeded = s university = univ lives, lived = l

 

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THIS IS A WAY OF TEACHING ESL THAT IS “GREAT”

Copy of stdnts

 

 

 

BY TEACHER ALVIN ON OCT 21, 2014

ENG INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE CENTER

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE
RESOURCE BOOK: PRONUNCIATION PAIRS LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULTBOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING,PRONUNCIATION, SLE TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH
Nickname ALVIN DAVIS
Nationality AMERICAN
Major: ESL TEACHER
Subject PRONUNCIATION
COURSE OBJECTIVESThis one month class is to learn to speak American English with a clear sounding of the words, to be able to speak to other people and have them understand what you are talking about, not slurred, or with slang.

Suggestions / Recommendations

Pronunciation Pairs: (To say the words very clearly), (To Remember to sound the words very clearly),

(To say the correct “ED” sound and the correct “S” “IZ” or “Z” sounds), (To say with the correct Intonations),

(Flow of the words together), (To put the emotions into your words), (To find the sounds that change in a word).

(To stress on words that have a different meaning), (To show excitement with some parts of speech).

Course Outline

Week 1 – Students will begin the class with a basic pronunciation test which will cover all vowel and consonant sounds as well as consonant clusters. From the students performance on this test individual vowel and consonant sounds will be identified and targeted for classroom learning. More complicated consonant combinations as well as past tense verb and plurals “S” endings will be practiced and reviewed.

Step 01: One hour of Pronunciation Pairs. Five Units per hour, will improve there pronunciation level in one week, each week will build confidence in there ability to speak and understand the new vocabulary of English.

Week 2 – Students will be introduced to word stress. As a means of teaching this students will learn syllable count, prefix and suffix pronunciation and compound word pronunciation and stress. Students will begin to learn higher aspects of American accent word stress and reduction of pronouns and modals.

Step 01: One hour of Grammar, will help the student start saying sentence patterns, this week will be the growing of Pronunciation with Vocabulary words. The American accent and word stress and reduction of pronouns will also be used to help the student understanding the forms of America stress and other country’s English.

Step 02: One Hour of Pronunciation. Continuing the Five Units per hour with now the Grammar you will start to see the students using the English outside of the classroom.

Week 3 – Students will work on English rhythm patterns to include highlighting stressed words within a sentence, thought groups and usual patterns of speech associated with pronouns, articles, contractions and prepositions. A closer look will be taken at phrasal verbs and descriptive devices such as simile and metaphor.

Step 01: Reading, Writing, listening. One hour of Reading, Writing, listening, will play a roll in the developing of the student’s interest in the English language as well as the understanding of “WHY” when a student can understand the why of English they start learning at a faster pace.

Step 02: One hour of Pronunciation. Continuing the Five Units per hour with now the Grammar, Reading, Writing, Listening, you will start to see the students using the English outside of the classroom even more then the first two weeks.

Week 4 –Students will be introduced to Intonation. Listing intonation, question/tag question and drop-rise intonation. Pitch range and expressive intonation will be covered. Blending, reduction and higher level English speaking skills useful in IELTs, TOEIC and TOEFL will be learned.

Step 01: Review, It is important for the student to review all that they have learned, and the mistakes that the teacher now can correct and get the student to remember the correct way to Speak, Read, Write, Listen and use the proper Grammar.

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE

RESOURCE BOOK: BASICGRAMMAR IN USE LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING, SLE, TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

COURSE OBJECTIVES: Grammar is important because it is the language that makes it possible for us to talk about language. Grammar names the types of words and word groups that make up sentencesnot only in English but in any language. As human beings, we can put sentences together even as children–we can all do grammar. But to be able to talk about how sentences are built, about the types of words and word groups that make up sentences–that is knowing about grammar. And knowing about grammar offers a window into the human mind and into our amazingly complex mental capacity. People associate grammar with errors and correctness. But knowing about grammar also helps us understand what makes sentences and paragraphs clear and interesting and precise. Grammar can be part of literature discussions, when we and our students closely read the sentences in poetry and stories. And knowing about grammar means finding out that all languages and all dialects follow grammatical patterns.

GRAMMAR: To Learn English Grammar and how the differences are between learning English in it true form. The English Language has many different parts of Grammar and to understand each part it must be done one step at a time.

Suggestions / Recommendation:

Basic Grammar in Use: (To learn Grammar is a short time and to insure that the Grammar can be used in a formal and a business setting). To learn all the parts of Grammar, Present, Past, Present Perfect, Passive,

Verb Forms, Future, Modals, Imperatives, Auxiliary Verbs, Questions, Reported Speech, Pronouns, Possessives, Determiners, and Pronouns, with Adjectives and Adverbs, Prepositions, Two Word Verbs,

Conjunctions and Clauses.

Course Outline

  1. Week 1 – Students will begin the class with a basic grammar in use test. If they are a beginner then they will start at the Unit 01. AM/IS/ARE, This will start them learning the Positive and Negative with sentence structure and where to use them. (That’s=That is There’s=There is) they will do the exercises 1.1 to 1.6. Start: Unit 2. Exercises 2.1 to 2.5 (Questions) How to ask questions. Unit 3. Exercises 3.1 to 3.4 (Present Continuous) In these Exercises there are complete the sentences with a follow up with the teachers and with there homework. Writing about a small picture and using the proper Grammar, also writing about true sentences. Students will start Learning (Present Continuous Questions) this will build there Grammar at a faster pace. Unit 4 – 4.1 to 4.4 Exercises looking at the picture and write the proper questions to be asked in the conversation. Unit 5 – (Simple Present) Exercises 5.1 to 5.5 using Verbs. Asking Questions to other students and staff. Students will began learning (Simple Present Negative) Unit 6 Exercise 6.1 to 6.5 This will be writing negative sentences, study the information and write sentence with like, putting the verb in the correct form (Positive or Negative) Unit 7- 7.1 to 7.4 (Simple Present Questions) Write Questions also using the verbs. Write true short answers. Unit 8 – 8.1 to 8.3 (Present Continuous and Simple Present) using Present Continuous in the proper way of a sentence structure. Week 2 – Unit 9 using 9.1 to 9.4 Exercises Rewriting sentences with (got) (have) (do’s and don’t) Unit 10 is using Was/Were will be doing (Positive) (Negative) (Questions) with short answers. Start learning the correct order of the sentence. Unit 11 (Simple Past) Exercises 11.1 to 11.2 will use simple past of the verb usage. Fill in the blanks with the proper verb and Simple Past forms. Unit 12 (Simple Past Negative and Questions) Exercise 12.1 to 12.5 Complete the sentences with the proper past tense words putting the verb in the correct form. Week 3 – Unit 13 (Past Continuous) Exercises 13.1 to 13.4 looking at the picture and fill in the blanks. What did the student do? In past continuous form, complete the questions. Unit 14 (Past Continuous and Simple Past) Unit 15 (I Used to ) Unit 16 (present Perfect) Unit 17 (Simple Present and Present Perfect) Unit 18 (For, Since, Ago) Unit 19 (I Have Done and I Did). Week 4 – Unit 20 (Just, Already, and Yet) Unit 21 (I’ve Lost My Key,) Unit 22 (Passive) Unit 23 (Is Being Done) Unit 24 (Be, Have, do, in Present and Past) Unit 25 (Regular and Irregular Verbs) Unit 26 (What Are You Doing?) Unit 27 (I’m Going To) Unit 28 (Will) Unit 29 (I’ll, Will) Unit 30 (Might) Unit 31 (Can and Could) Unit 32 (Must)
  2. This is where we will start the review. The review is very important to show what the student has really learned. There will be a Grammar test to show how much the student has learned.

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE RESOURCE BOOK: WRITING LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING, SLE TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

MORE STEPS TO WRITTING: To Learn English Writing and how the differences are between learning English in it true form. The English Language has many different parts of Writing and to understand each part it must be done one step at a time.

Suggestions / Recommendation:

More Steps to Writing: To establish writing skill’s for Business, a Contract, a E-Mail, just about anything you will need the ability to write in some form or another. Even though we live in a computer age there are still many things that need to be written or typed correctly.

Week 1- Unit 01 (Sports) Descriptive Composition Unit 02 (Entertainment) Informal Letter Unit 03 (Relationships) Discursive Composition

WeeK 2- Unit 04 (Emergencies) Short Story Unit 05 (Travel) Letter to a friend Unit 06 (Health and Fitness) Report Writing

Week 3- Unit 07 (Employment) Article Unit 08 (City and Country life) Discursive Composition

Week 4- Review, make sure of all the spelling of each thing that is done, Grammar, and content will be the best for the student to learn how to write a good report, letter, e-mail.

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE

RESOURCE BOOK: EnglishVOCABULARY in Use LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING, ESL TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

COURSE OBJECTIVES: To teach the student a group of vocabulary words and how to use them in a sentence with the proper Grammar, and to understand the definition of vocabulary words and how to use them in different ways. English has a vast way of using the vocabulary words, so by teaching them how to use them in different situations will increase the ability to use them correctly.

Book: English Vocabulary in Use:

(Everyday Verbs) (Words and Grammar) (People) (The World) (At Home) (School and Workplace) (Leisure) (Social Issues)

Week 1: Everyday Verbs, Using language Words, Talking About Language, Learning Vocabulary, Learn words in Family, Picture and Diagrams, Exercises, 2.1 to 9.5

Week 2: (Bring) (Get) (Phrasal Verbs) (Everyday Things) (Talking) (Moving) (Conjunctions) (Time Words) (Places) Exercises, 10.1 to 18.5

Week 3: (Manner) (Irregular Verbs) (Common Uncountable Words) (Common Adjective Good and Bad) (Words and Prepositions) (Prefixes) Exercises, 19.1 to 25.6

Week 4: Review Exercises 2.1 to 25.6, Test, and correct the mistakes the student are making.

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE RESOURCE BOOK: SPEAKING LISTENING EXPRESSION LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING, SLE TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

COURSE OBJECTIVES: Intro provides numerous opportunities for high beginning students to actively learn contemporary American English expressions. This text is also appropriate for vocabulary courses. – Expressions are presented in interesting contexts — i.e., speaking on a car phone, being afraid to talk in school — and are spiralled through natural dialogues and listening activities. – Learning strategies, such as vocabulary indexing and clustering, focus students on becoming independent learners. – Activities include games, cartoons, role-plays, surveys, and dictations, as well as listening and writing activities that appeal to a wide range of learning styles.

SPEAKING LISTENING EXPRESSION:

The SLE (Speaking, Listening, Expression) program is a conversation program for adult and young adult learners of English as a foreign language. It aims to improve learners’ communicative competence through an emphasis on interaction. It enables learners to acquire and practice using important functions and expressions in natural contexts while, at the same time, stimulating conversation related to various topics and real-life situations. It utilizes a number of communicative approaches to language learning in order to facilitate the learners’ timely and effective acquisition of English. The aim of the program is to improve learners’ speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills as well as their vocabulary and grammar skills. The SLE series provides learners with the tools they need to use their newly acquired language skills in the real world. It aims to help build learners’ confidence in using English outside the classroom by increasing their understanding of and involvement in the learning process. Most importantly, the SLE series will challenge learners and help them believe in themselves. All learners participating in the SLE program will be able take the Pagoda motto to heart. Week 1: (Nice to Meet You) (What’s your Favorite?) (Time is on my Side) (What are you doing Nowadays?) (Weather and Seasons) (Red Letter Day) (There’s still a lot Left)Week 2: (All in the Family) (The Future is Bright) What Happened?) (I can Do It!) (Nice Suit) (Not Just Another Pretty Face) (Learning the Ins and Outs) (Wild Kingdom)

Week 3: (Would You Rather?) (Growing Up) (That Sounds Fine) (Give Me One good Reason) (Home is Where the Heart is)

Week 4: Review, Test, and correct the mistakes from each Unit, make sure there is no questions that are not answered.

(GROUP) OR ONE ON ONE RESOURCE BOOK: READING ADVANTAGE LEVEL: BEGINNER to ADULT

BOOKS: GRAMMAR, VOCABULARY, READING, WRITING, SLE TIME FRAME: ONE MONTH

COURSE OBJECTIVES: what a language objective is

  • steps that teachers can take to create language objectives
  • how to implement language objectives in a general education classroom
  • how to align objectives to content and language standards
  • articulate for learners the academic language functions and skills that they need to master to fully participate in the lesson and meet the grade-level content standards.
  • are beneficial not only for language learners but for all students in a class, as everyone can benefit from the clarity that comes with a teacher outlining the requisite academic language to be learned and mastered in each lesson.

Week 1: (Reading Comprehension) (Idioms) (Vocabulary Reinforcement) (Target Vocabulary) (What do you Think?) (Video Jockeys) (Coffee Culture) (Around the World)

Week 2: Review last week progress and (Test) (The Puffer Fish) (Getting Married) (Say It with Flowers) (Bollywood) (The Nobel Prize)

Week 3: Review last week progress and (Test) (A Funny Cure) (Palm Reading) (Amazing Memory) (Incredible Dogs) (Diamonds)

Week 4: Review last week progress and (Test) (Space Explorers) (Happy New Year) (Text Messaging) (Urban Legends)

08:00 to 08:50: Pronunciation Pairs

09:00 to 09:50:Basic Grammar in Use

10:00 to 10:50: More Steps to Writing

11:00 to 11:50: EnglishVOCABULARY in Use

12:00 to 13:00: Lunch

13:00 to 13:50: SPEAKING LISTENING EXPRESSION

14:00 to 14:50: READING ADVANTAGE

15:00 to 16:50: Optional Classes (POP) (MOVIES) (SURVIVAL) (PATTERN) (CNN) (BUSINESS) (PRESENTATION)

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“PHILIPPINE WORKS ARE SPREADING EBOLA BACK TO THE PHILIPPINES!!!!

 

MANILA, Philippines (AP) — The World Health Organization called the Ebola outbreak “the most severe, acute health emergency seen in modern times” on Monday but also said that economic disruptions can be curbed if people are adequately informed to prevent irrational moves to dodge infection.

WHO Director-General Margaret Chan, citing World Bank figures, said 90 percent of economic costs of any outbreak “come from irrational and disorganized efforts of the public to avoid infection.”

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Staffers of the global health organization “are very well aware that fear of infection has spread around the world much faster than the virus,” Chan said in a statement read out to a regional health conference in the Philippine capital, Manila.

“We are seeing, right now, how this virus can disrupt economies and societies around the world,” she said, but added that adequately educating the public was a “good defense strategy” and would allow governments to prevent economic disruptions.

The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 4,000 people, mostly in the West African countries of Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, according to WHO figures published last week.

Chan did not specify those steps but praised the Philippines for holding an anti-Ebola summit last week which was joined by government health officials and private sector representatives, warning that the Southeast Asian country was vulnerable due to the large number of Filipinos working abroad.

While bracing for Ebola, health officials should continue to focus on major health threats, including non-communicable diseases, she said.

Philippine Health Secretary Enrique Ona said authorities will ask more than 1,700 Filipinos working in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea to observe themselves for at least 21 days for Ebola symptoms in those countries first if they plan to return home.

Once home, they should observe themselves for another 21 days and then report the result of their self-screening to health authorities to be doubly sure they have not been infected, he said, adding that hospitals which would deal with any Ebola patients have already been identified in the Philippines.

Last month, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon urged leaders in the most affected countries to establish special centers that aim to isolate infected people from non-infected relatives in an effort to stem the spread of Ebola.

Ban has also appealed for airlines and shipping companies not to suspend services to countries affected by Ebola. Doing so, he said, hinders delivery of humanitarian and medical assistance.

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“BETTER READ THIS” EBOLA in the “Air conditioning” “SYSTEMS

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this is my new web-site for the homeless people around the world

Industrial air handlers for rent

All “BUILDING” have Air conditioning in them and the return air that is cycled through them can and will spread the “EBOLA” all over the buildings.

“WHY” has no one said anything about this?

“WHY” has no one said anything on the plans that are going all over the world?

Air conditioning (often referred to as A/C, AC or aircon) is the process of altering the properties of air (primarily temperature and humidity) to more comfortable conditions, typically with the aim of distributing the conditioned air to an occupied space to improve thermal comfort and indoor air quality.

Overview[edit]

In common use, an air conditioner is a device that lowers the air temperature. The cooling is typically achieved through a refrigeration cycle, but sometimes evaporation or free cooling is used.

In the most general sense, air conditioning can refer to any form of technology that modifies the condition of air (heating, cooling, (de-)humidification, cleaning, ventilation, or air movement). However, in construction, such a complete system of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning is referred to as HVAC (as opposed to AC).[1]

History[edit]

The basic concept behind air conditioning is said to have been applied in ancient Egypt, where reeds were hung in windows and were moistened with trickling water. The evaporation of water cooled the air blowing through the window. This process also made the air more humid, which can be beneficial in a dry desert climate. In Ancient Rome, water from aqueducts was circulated through the walls of certain houses to cool them. Other techniques in medieval Persia involved the use of cisterns and wind towers to cool buildings during the hot season.[2]

Modern air conditioning emerged from advances in chemistry during the 19th century, and the first large-scale electrical air conditioning was invented and used in 1902 by American inventor Willis Carrier. The introduction of residential air conditioning in the 1920s helped enable the great migration to the Sun Belt in the United States.

Development of mechanical cooling[edit]

Three-quarters scale model of Gorrie’s ice machine John Gorrie State Museum, Florida

The 2nd-century Chinese inventor Ding Huan (fl 180) of the Han Dynasty invented a rotary fan for air conditioning, with seven wheels 3 m (9.8 ft) in diameter and manually powered.[3] In 747, Emperor Xuanzong (r. 712–762) of the Tang Dynasty (618–907) had the Cool Hall (Liang Tian) built in the imperial palace, which the Tang Yulin describes as having water-powered fan wheels for air conditioning as well as rising jet streams of water from fountains. During the subsequent Song Dynasty (960–1279), written sources mentioned the air conditioning rotary fan as even more widely used.[4]

In the 17th century, Cornelis Drebbel demonstrated “Turning Summer into Winter” for James I of England by adding salt to water.[5]

In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed-up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer’s bulb and that the ice mass was about a quarter-inch thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: “From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer’s day”[6]

In 1820, English scientist and inventor Michael Faraday discovered that compressing and liquefying ammonia could chill air when the liquefied ammonia was allowed to evaporate. In 1842, Florida physician John Gorrie used compressor technology to create ice, which he used to cool air for his patients in his hospital in Apalachicola, Florida.[7] He hoped to eventually use his ice-making machine to regulate the temperature of buildings. He even envisioned centralized air conditioning that could cool entire cities.[8] Though his prototype leaked and performed irregularly, Gorrie was granted a patent in 1851 for his ice-making machine.[9] His hopes for its success vanished soon afterwards when his chief financial backer died; Gorrie did not get the money he needed to develop the machine. According to his biographer, Vivian M. Sherlock, he blamed the “Ice King”, Frederic Tudor, for his failure, suspecting that Tudor had launched a smear campaign against his invention. Dr. Gorrie died impoverished in 1855, and the idea of air conditioning went away for 50 years.

Since prehistoric times, snow and ice were used for cooling. The business of harvesting ice during winter and storing for use in summer became popular towards the late 19th century.[10] This practice was replaced by mechanical ice-making machines.

James Harrison‘s first mechanical ice-making machine began operation in 1851 on the banks of the Barwon River at Rocky Point in Geelong (Australia). His first commercial ice-making machine followed in 1854, and his patent for an ether vapor compression refrigeration system was granted in 1855. This novel system used a compressor to force the refrigeration gas to pass through a condenser, where it cooled down and liquefied. The liquefied gas then circulated through the refrigeration coils and vaporised again, cooling down the surrounding system. The machine employed a 5 m (16 ft.) flywheel and produced 3,000 kilograms (6,600 lb) of ice per day.[citation needed]

Though Harrison had commercial success establishing a second ice company back in Sydney in 1860, he later entered the debate over how to compete against the American advantage of unrefrigerated beef sales to the United Kingdom. He wrote: “Fresh meat frozen and packed as if for a voyage, so that the refrigerating process may be continued for any required period”, and in 1873 prepared the sailing ship Norfolk for an experimental beef shipment to the United Kingdom. His choice of a cold room system instead of installing a refrigeration system upon the ship itself proved disastrous when the ice was consumed faster than expected.[11]

Electromechanical cooling[edit]

In 1902, the first modern electrical air conditioning unit was invented by Willis Carrier in Buffalo, New York. After graduating from Cornell University, Carrier found a job at the Buffalo Forge Company. While there, he began experimenting with air conditioning as a way to solve an application problem for the Sackett-Wilhelms Lithographing and Publishing Company in Brooklyn, New York. The first air conditioner, designed and built in Buffalo by Carrier, began working on 17 July 1902.

Designed to improve manufacturing process control in a printing plant, Carrier’s invention controlled not only temperature but also humidity. Carrier used his knowledge of the heating of objects with steam and reversed the process. Instead of sending air through hot coils, he sent it through cold coils (filled with cold water). The air was cooled, and thereby the amount of moisture in the air could be controlled, which in turn made the humidity in the room controllable. The controlled temperature and humidity helped maintain consistent paper dimensions and ink alignment. Later, Carrier’s technology was applied to increase productivity in the workplace, and The Carrier Air Conditioning Company of America was formed to meet rising demand. Over time, air conditioning came to be used to improve comfort in homes and automobiles as well. Residential sales expanded dramatically in the 1950s.

In 1906, Stuart W. Cramer of Charlotte, North Carolina was exploring ways to add moisture to the air in his textile mill. Cramer coined the term “air conditioning”, using it in a patent claim he filed that year as an analogue to “water conditioning”, then a well-known process for making textiles easier to process. He combined moisture with ventilation to “condition” and change the air in the factories, controlling the humidity so necessary in textile plants. Willis Carrier adopted the term and incorporated it into the name of his company.[citation needed]

Shortly thereafter, the first private home to have air conditioning was built in Chapel Hill, North Carolina in 1933. Realizing that air conditioning would one day be a standard feature of private homes, particularly in regions with warmer climate, David St. Pierre DuBose (1898-1994) designed a network of ductwork and vents for his home Meadowmont, all disguised behind intricate and attractive Georgian-style open moldings. This building is believed to be one of the first private homes in the United States equipped for central air conditioning.[12]

In 1945, Robert Sherman of Lynn, Massachusetts invented a portable, in-window air conditioner that cooled, heated, humidified, dehumidified, and filtered the air. The idea was subsequently stolen[citation needed] by a large manufacturer.[which?] Sherman did not have the resources to fight the big corporation in court and thus never received any money or recognition. He died in 1962.[13]

Refrigerant development[edit]

Main article: Refrigerant

A modern R-134a hermetic refrigeration compressor

The first air conditioners and refrigerators employed toxic or flammable gases, such as ammonia, methyl chloride, or propane, that could result in fatal accidents when they leaked. Thomas Midgley, Jr. created the first non-flammable, non-toxic chlorofluorocarbon gas, Freon, in 1928. The name is a trademark name owned by DuPont for any Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC), or Hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant. The refrigerant names include a number indicating the molecular composition (e.g. R-11, R-12, R-22, R-134A). The blend most used in direct-expansion home and building comfort cooling is an HCFC known as R-22.

R-12 was the most common blend used in automobiles in the US until 1994, when most designs changed to R-134A due to the ozone-depleting potential of R-12. R-11 and R-12 are no longer manufactured in the US for this type of application, so the only source for air-conditioning repair purposes is the cleaned and purified gas recovered from other air conditioner systems. Several non-ozone-depleting refrigerants have been developed as alternatives, including R-410A. It was first commercially used by Carrier Corp. under the brand name Puron.

Modern refrigerants have been developed to be more environmentally safe than many of the early chlorofluorocarbon-based refrigerants used in the early- and mid-twentieth century. These include as HCFCs (R-22, used in most U.S. homes even before 2011) and HFCs (R-134a, used in most cars) have replaced most CFC use. HCFCs, in turn, are supposed to have been in the process of being phased out under the Montreal Protocol and replaced by hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) such as R-410A, which lack chlorine.[citation needed] HFCs, however, contribute to climate change problems. Moreover, policy and political influence by corporate executives resisted change.[14][15] In fact, since corporate executives insisted that no alternatives to HFCs existed, the non-governmental organization (NGO) Greenpeace solicited a European laboratory to research an alternative ozone- and climate-safe refrigerant in 1992, gained patent rights to a hydrocarbon mix of isopentane and isobutane, but then left the technology as open access.[16][17] Their activist marketing first in Germany led to companies like Whirlpool, Bosch, and later LG and others to incorporate the technology throughout Europe, then Asia, although the corporate executives resisted in Latin America, so that it arrived in Argentina produced by a domestic firm in 2003, and then finally with giant Bosch’s production in Brazil by 2004.[18][19] In 1995, Germany made CFC refrigerators illegal.[20] Du Pont and other companies blocked the refrigerant in the U.S. with the U.S. E.P.A., disparaging the approach as “that German technology.”[19][21] Nevertheless, in 2004, Greenpeace worked with multinational corporations like Coca-Cola and Unilever, and later Pepsico and others, to create a corporate coalition called Refrigerants Naturally!.[20][22][23] Then, four years later, Ben & Jerry’s of Unilever and General Electric began to take steps to support production and use in the U.S.[24][25] Only in 2011 did the E.P.A. finally decide in favor of the ozone- and climate-safe refrigerant for U.S. manufacture.[16][26][27]

Operating principles[edit]

Refrigeration cycle[edit]

Main article: Refrigeration cycle

A simple stylized diagram of the refrigeration cycle: 1) condensing coil, 2) expansion valve, 3) evaporator coil, 4) compressor

Capillary expansion valve connection to evaporator inlet. Notice frost formation

In the refrigeration cycle, heat is transported from a colder location to a hotter area. As heat would naturally flow in the opposite direction, work is required to achieve this. A refrigerator is an example of such a system, as it transports the heat out of the interior and into its environment (i.e. the room). The refrigerant is used as the medium which absorbs and removes heat from the space to be cooled and subsequently rejects that heat elsewhere.

Circulating refrigerant vapor enters the compressor and is compressed to a higher pressure, resulting in a higher temperature as well. The hot, compressed refrigerant vapor is now at a temperature and pressure at which it can be condensed and is routed through a condenser. Here it is cooled by air flowing across the condenser coils and condensed into a liquid. Thus, the circulating refrigerant rejects heat from the system and the heat is carried away by the air.

The condensed and pressurized liquid refrigerant is next routed through an expansion valve where it undergoes an abrupt reduction in pressure. That pressure reduction results in flash evaporation of a part of the liquid refrigerant, lowering its temperature. The cold refrigerant is then routed through the evaporator. A fan blows the warm air (which is to be cooled) across the evaporator, causing the liquid part of the cold refrigerant mixture to evaporate as well, further lowering the temperature. The warm air is therefore cooled.

To complete the refrigeration cycle, the refrigerant vapor is routed back into the compressor.

By placing the condenser inside a compartment, and the evaporator in the ambient environment (such as outside), or by merely running an air conditioner’s refrigerant in the opposite direction, the overall effect is the opposite, and the compartment is heated instead of cooled. See also heat pump.

The engineering of physical and thermodynamic properties of gas–vapor mixtures is called psychrometrics.

Heat pump[edit]

Main article: Heat pump

Heat pump is a term for a type of air conditioner in which the refrigeration cycle can be reversed, producing heating instead of cooling in the indoor environment. They are also commonly referred to, and marketed as, a “reverse cycle air conditioner”. Using an air conditioner in this way to produce heat is significantly more energy efficient than electric resistance heating. Some homeowners elect to have a heat pump system installed, which is simply a central air conditioner with heat pump functionality (the refrigeration cycle can be reversed in cold weather). When the heat pump is in heating mode, the indoor evaporator coil switches roles and becomes the condenser coil, producing heat. The outdoor condenser unit also switches roles to serve as the evaporator, and discharges cold air (colder than the ambient outdoor air).

Heat pumps are more popular in milder winter climates where the temperature is frequently in the range of 40–55 °F (4–13 °C), because heat pumps become inefficient in more extreme cold. This is due to the problem of ice forming on the outdoor unit’s heat exchanger coil, which blocks air flow over the coil. To compensate for this, the heat pump system must temporarily switch back into the regular air conditioning mode to switch the outdoor evaporator coil back to being the condenser coil, so that it can heat up and defrost. A heat pump system will therefore have a form of electric resistance heating in the indoor air path that is activated only in this mode in order to compensate for the temporary indoor air cooling, which would otherwise be uncomfortable in the winter. The icing problem becomes much more severe with lower outdoor temperatures, so heat pumps are commonly installed in tandem with a more conventional form of heating, such as a natural gas or oil furnace, which is used instead of the heat pump during harsher winter temperatures. In this case, the heat pump is used efficiently during the milder temperatures, and the system is switched to the conventional heat source when the outdoor temperature is lower.it also works on the basis of carnot cycle

Absorption heat pumps are actually a kind of air-source heat pump, but they do not depend on electricity to power them. Instead, gas, solar power, or heated water is used as a main power source. Additionally, refrigerant is not used at all in the process.[dubious ] An absorption pump absorbs ammonia into water.[further explanation needed] Next, the water and ammonia mixture is depressurized to induce boiling, and the ammonia is boiled off, resulting in cooling.[28]

Some more expensive window air conditioning units have a true heat pump function. However, a window unit that has a “heat” selection is not necessarily a heat pump because some units use only electric resistance heat when heating is desired. A unit that has true heat pump functionality will be indicated its specifications by the term “heat pump”.

Evaporative cooling[edit]

Main article: Evaporative cooler

An evaporative cooler

In very dry climates, evaporative coolers, sometimes referred to as swamp coolers or desert coolers, are popular for improving coolness during hot weather. An evaporative cooler is a device that draws outside air through a wet pad, such as a large sponge soaked with water. The sensible heat of the incoming air, as measured by a dry bulb thermometer, is reduced. The total heat (sensible heat plus latent heat) of the entering air is unchanged. Some of the sensible heat of the entering air is converted to latent heat by the evaporation of water in the wet cooler pads. If the entering air is dry enough, the results can be quite cooling. Evaporative coolers tend to feel as if they are not working during times of high humidity, when there is not much dry air with which the coolers can work to make the air as cool as possible for dwelling occupants. Unlike other types of air conditioners, evaporative coolers rely on the outside air to be channeled through cooler pads that cool the air before it reaches the inside of a house through its air duct system; this cooled outside air must be allowed to push the warmer air within the house out through an exhaust opening such as an open door or window.[29] These coolers cost less and are mechanically simple to understand and maintain.

An early type of cooler, using ice for a further effect, was patented by John Gorrie of Apalachicola, Florida in 1842. He used the device to cool the patients in his malaria hospital.[citation needed]

Free cooling[edit]

Main article: Free cooling

Air conditioning can also be provided by a process called free cooling which uses pumps to circulate a coolant (typically water or a glycol mix) from a cold source, which in turn acts as a heat sink for the energy that is removed from the cooled space. Common storage media are deep aquifers or a natural underground rock mass accessed via a cluster of small-diameter boreholes, equipped with heat exchanger. Some systems with small storage capacity are hybrid systems, using free cooling early in the cooling season, and later employing a heat pump to chill the circulation coming from the storage. The heat pump is added because the temperature of the storage gradually increases during the cooling season, thereby declining its effectiveness.

Free cooling systems can have very high efficiencies, and are sometimes combined with seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) so the cold of winter can be used for summer air conditioning. Free cooling and hybrid systems are mature technology.[30]

Humidity control[edit]

Since humans perspire to provide natural cooling by the evaporation of perspiration from the skin, drier air (up to a point) improves the comfort provided. The comfort air conditioner is designed to create a 40% to 60% relative humidity in the occupied space.

Dehumidification and cooling[edit]

Refrigeration air conditioning equipment usually reduces the absolute humidity of the air processed by the system. The relatively cold (below the dewpoint) evaporator coil condenses water vapor from the processed air, much like an ice-cold drink will condense water on the outside of a glass. Therefore, water vapor is removed from the cooled air and the relative humidity in the room is lowered. The water is usually sent to a drain or may simply drip onto the ground outdoors. The heat is rejected by the condenser which is located outside of room to be cooled.

Dehumidification only[edit]

Main article: Dehumidifier

Typical portable dehumidifier

An air conditioner that is used only for dehumidifying is called a dehumidifier. It also uses a refrigeration cycle, but differs from a “regular” air conditioner in that both the evaporator and the condenser are placed in the same air path. A “regular” air conditioner transfers heat energy out of the room because its condenser coil is outside. However, since all components of the dehumidifier are in the same room, no heat energy is removed. Instead, the electric power consumed by the dehumidifier remains in the room as heat, so the room is actually heated, just as by an electric heater that draws the same amount of power. In addition, if the condensed water has been removed from the room, the amount of heat needed to boil that water has been added to the room (the “latent heat of vaporization“). The dehumidification process is the inverse of adding water to the room with an evaporative cooler, and instead releases heat.

Inside the unit, the air passes over the evaporator coil first and is cooled and dehumidified. The now dehumidified, cold air then passes over the condenser coil where it is warmed up again. Then the air is released back into the room. The unit produces warm, dehumidified air and can usually be placed freely in the environment (room) that is to be conditioned.

Dehumidifiers are commonly used in cold, damp climates to prevent mold growth indoors, especially in basements. They are also used to protect sensitive equipment from the adverse effects of excessive humidity in tropical countries.

Energy transfer[edit]

In a thermodynamically closed system, any power dissipated into the system that is being maintained at a set temperature (which is a standard mode of operation for modern air conditioners) requires that the rate of energy removal by the air conditioner increase. This increase has the effect that, for each unit of energy input into the system (say to power a light bulb in the closed system), the air conditioner removes that energy.[31] In order to do so, the air conditioner must increase its power consumption by the inverse of its “efficiency” (coefficient of performance) times the amount of power dissipated into the system. As an example, assume that inside the closed system a 100 W heating element is activated, and the air conditioner has an coefficient of performance of 200%. The air conditioner’s power consumption will increase by 50 W to compensate for this, thus making the 100 W heating element cost a total of 150 W of power.

It is typical for air conditioners to operate at “efficiencies” of significantly greater than 100%.[32] However, it may be noted that the input electrical energy is of higher thermodynamic quality (lower entropy) than the output thermal energy (heat energy).

Air conditioner equipment power in the U.S. is often described in terms of “tons of refrigeration”. A ton of refrigeration is approximately equal to the cooling power of one short ton (2000 pounds or 907 kilograms) of ice melting in a 24-hour period. The value is defined as 12,000 BTU per hour, or 3517 watts.[33] Residential central air systems are usually from 1 to 5 tons (3 to 20 kilowatts (kW)) in capacity.

Seasonal energy efficiency ratio[edit]

For residential homes, some countries set minimum requirements for energy efficiency. In the United States, the efficiency of air conditioners is often (but not always) rated by the seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER). The higher the SEER rating, the more energy efficient is the air conditioner. The SEER rating is the BTU of cooling output during its normal annual usage divided by the total electric energy input in watt hours (W·h) during the same period.[34]

SEER = BTU ÷ (W·h)

this can also be rewritten as:

SEER = (BTU / h) ÷ W, where “W” is the average electrical power in Watts, and (BTU/h) is the rated cooling power.

For example, a 5000 BTU/h air-conditioning unit, with a SEER of 10, would consume 5000/10 = 500 Watts of power on average.

The electrical energy consumed per year can be calculated as the average power multiplied by the annual operating time:

500 W × 1000 h = 500,000 W·h = 500 kWh

Assuming 1000 hours of operation during a typical cooling season (i.e., 8 hours per day for 125 days per year).

Another method that yields the same result, is to calculate the total annual cooling output:

5000 BTU/h × 1000 h = 5,000,000 BTU

Then, for a SEER of 10, the annual electrical energy usage would be:

5,000,000 BTU ÷ 10 = 500,000 W·h = 500 kWh

SEER is related to the coefficient of performance (COP) commonly used in thermodynamics and also to the Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER). The EER is the efficiency rating for the equipment at a particular pair of external and internal temperatures, while SEER is calculated over a whole range of external temperatures (i.e., the temperature distribution for the geographical location of the SEER test). SEER is unusual in that it is composed of an Imperial unit divided by an SI unit. The COP is a ratio with the same metric units of energy (joules) in both the numerator and denominator. They cancel out, leaving a dimensionless quantity. Formulas for the approximate conversion between SEER and EER or COP are available from the Pacific Gas and Electric Company:[35]

(1) SEER = EER ÷ 0.9
(2) SEER = COP × 3.792
(3) EER = COP × 3.413

From equation (2) above, a SEER of 13 is equivalent to a COP of 3.43, which means that 3.43 units of heat energy are pumped per unit of work energy.

The United States now requires that residential systems manufactured in 2006 have a minimum SEER rating of 13 (although window-box systems are exempt from this law, so their SEER is still around 10).[36]

Installation types[edit]

Window unit and packaged terminal[edit]

Air conditioning window unit

Parts of a windows unit

Window unit air conditioners are installed in an open window. The interior air is cooled as a fan blows it over the evaporator. On the exterior the heat drawn from the interior is dissipated into the environment as a second fan blows outside air over the condenser. A large house or building may have several such units, permitting each room to be cooled separately.[37]

PTAC systems are also known as wall-split air conditioning systems or ductless systems.[38] These PTAC systems which are frequently used in hotels have two separate units (terminal packages), the evaporative unit on the interior and the condensing unit on the exterior, with an opening passing through the wall and connecting them. This minimizes the interior system footprint and allows each room to be adjusted independently. PTAC systems may be adapted to provide heating in cold weather, either directly by using an electric strip, gas, or other heater, or by reversing the refrigerant flow to heat the interior and draw heat from the exterior air, converting the air conditioner into a heat pump. While room air conditioning provides maximum flexibility, when used to cool many rooms at a time it is generally more expensive than central air conditioning.

The first practical through-the-wall air conditioning unit was invented by engineers at Chrysler Motors and offered for sale starting in 1935.[39]

Split systems[edit]

Split-system air conditioners come in two forms: mini-split and central systems. In both types, the inside-environment (evaporative) heat exchanger is separated by some distance from the outside-environment (condensing unit) heat exchanger.

Mini-split (ductless) system[edit]

Outside part of a ductless split-type air conditioner

Indoor part of a ductless split-type air conditioner

A mini-split system typically supplies chilled air to a single or a few rooms of a building.[40] Mini-split systems typically produce 9,000–36,000 Btu (9,500–38,000 kJ) per hour of cooling.[41]

Advantages of the ductless system include smaller size and flexibility for zoning or heating and cooling individual rooms. The inside wall space required is significantly reduced. Also, the compressor and heat exchanger can be located further away from the inside space, rather than merely on the other side of the same unit as in a PTAC or window air conditioner. Flexible exterior hoses lead from the outside unit to the interior one(s); these are often enclosed with metal to look like common drainpipes from the roof. In addition, ductless systems offer higher efficiency (up to 27.1 SEER on some systems).[citation needed]

The primary disadvantage of ductless air conditioners is their cost. Such systems cost about $1,500 to $2,000 per ton (12,000 Btu per hour) of cooling capacity. This is about 30% more than central systems (not including ductwork) and may cost more than twice as much as window units of similar capacity.”[42]

An additional possible disadvantage that may increase net cost is that ductless systems may sometimes not be eligible for energy efficiency rebates offered by many electric utility companies as part of an incentive program to reduce summer cooling load on the electrical grid.[43]

Central (ducted) air conditioning[edit]

Central (ducted) air conditioning offers whole-house or large-commercial-space cooling, and often offers moderate multi-zone temperature control capability by the addition of air-louver-control boxes.

In central air conditioning, the inside heat-exchanger is typically placed inside the central furnace/AC unit of the forced air heating system which is then used in the summer to distribute chilled air throughout a residence or commercial building.

Portable units[edit]

A portable air conditioner can be easily transported inside a home or office. They are currently available with capacities of about 5,000–60,000 BTU/h (1,800–18,000 W output) and with or without electric-resistance heaters. Portable air conditioners are either evaporative or refrigerative.

The compressor-based refrigerant systems are air-cooled, meaning they use air to exchange heat, in the same way as a car or typical household air conditioner does. Such a system dehumidifies the air as it cools it. It collects water condensed from the cooled air and produces hot air which must be vented outside the cooled area; doing so transfers heat from the air in the cooled area to the outside air.

Portable split system[edit]

A portable split system has an indoor unit on wheels connected to an outdoor unit via flexible pipes, similar to a permanently fixed installed unit.

Portable hose system[edit]

Hose systems, which can be monoblock or air-to-air, are vented to the outside via air ducts. The monoblock type collects the water in a bucket or tray and stops when full. The air-to-air type re-evaporates the water and discharges it through the ducted hose and can run continuously.

A single-hose unit uses air from within the room to cool its condenser, and then vents it outside. This air is replaced by hot air from outside or other rooms (due to the negative pressure inside the room), thus reducing the unit’s effectiveness.[44]

Modern units might have a coefficient of performance of approximately 3 (i.e., 1 kW of electricity will produce 3 kW of cooling). A dual-hose unit draws air to cool its condenser from outside instead of from inside the room, and thus is more effective than most single-hose units.

Portable evaporative system[edit]

Evaporative coolers, sometimes called “swamp coolers”, do not have a compressor or condenser. Liquid water is evaporated on the cooling fins, releasing the vapor into the cooled area. Evaporating water absorbs a significant amount of heat, the latent heat of vaporisation, cooling the air. Humans and animals use the same mechanism to cool themselves by sweating.

Evaporative coolers have the advantage of needing no hoses to vent heat outside the cooled area, making them truly portable. They are also very cheap to install and use less energy than refrigerative air conditioners.

Disadvantages are that unless ambient humidity is low (as in a dry climate), cooling is limited and the cooled air is very humid and can feel clammy. Also, they use a lot of water, which is often at a premium in the dry climates where they work best.

Uses[edit]

Air-conditioning engineers broadly divide air conditioning applications into comfort and process applications.

Comfort applications[edit]

Comfort applications aim to provide a building indoor environment that remains relatively constant despite changes in external weather conditions or in internal heat loads.

Air conditioning makes deep plan buildings feasible, for otherwise they would have to be built narrower or with light wells so that inner spaces received sufficient outdoor air via natural ventilation. Air conditioning also allows buildings to be taller, since wind speed increases significantly with altitude making natural ventilation impractical for very tall buildings.[citation needed] Comfort applications are quite different for various building types and may be categorized as:

  • Commercial buildings, which are built for commerce, including offices, malls, shopping centers, restaurants, etc.
  • High-rise residential buildings, such as tall dormitories and apartment blocks
  • Industrial spaces where thermal comfort of workers is desired
  • Institutional buildings, which includes government buildings, hospitals, schools, etc.
  • Low-rise residential buildings, including single-family houses, duplexes, and small apartment buildings
  • Sports stadiums, such as the University of Phoenix Stadium[45] and in Qatar for the 2022 FIFA World Cup.[46]

The structural impact of an air conditioning unit will depend on the type and size of the unit.[47]

In addition to buildings, air conditioning can be used for many types of transportation, including automobiles, buses and other land vehicles, trains, ships, aircraft, and spacecraft.

Domestic use[edit]

Air conditioning is common in the US, with 88% of new single-family homes constructed in 2011 including air conditioning, ranging from 99% in the South to 62% in the West.[48] In Europe, home air conditioning is generally less common. Southern European countries such as Greece have seen a wide proliferation of home air-conditioning units in recent years.[49] In another southern European country, Malta, it is estimated that around 55% of households have an air conditioner installed.[50] In India AC sales have dropped by 40% [clarification needed] due to higher costs and stricter energy efficiency regulations.[51]

Process applications[edit]

Process applications aim to provide a suitable environment for a process being carried out, regardless of internal heat and humidity loads and external weather conditions. It is the needs of the process that determine conditions, not human preference. Process applications include these:

In both comfort and process applications, the objective may be to not only control temperature, but also humidity, air quality, and air movement from space to space.

Health issues[edit]

Air-conditioning systems can promote the growth and spread of microorganisms,[52] such as Legionella pneumophila, the infectious agent responsible for Legionnaires’ disease, or thermophilic actinomycetes; however, this is only prevalent in poorly maintained water cooling towers. As long as the cooling tower is kept clean (usually by means of a chlorine treatment), these health hazards can be avoided.

Conversely, air conditioning (including filtration, humidification, cooling and disinfection) can be used to provide a clean, safe, hypoallergenic atmosphere in hospital operating rooms and other environments where an appropriate atmosphere is critical to patient safety and well-being. Excessive air conditioning can have a negative effect on skin, drying it out,[53] and can also cause dehydration.[54]

Environmental impact[edit]

Power consumption[edit]

Innovation in air conditioning technologies continues, with much recent emphasis placed on energy efficiency. Production of the electricity used to operate air conditioners has an environmental impact, including the release of greenhouse gasses.

Cylinder unloaders are a method of load control used mainly in commercial air conditioning systems. On a semi-hermetic (or open) compressor, the heads can be fitted with unloaders which remove a portion of the load from the compressor so that it can run better when full cooling is not needed. Unloaders can be electrical or mechanical.

In an automobile, the A/C system will use around 4 horsepower (3 kW) of the engine’s power, thus increasing fuel consumption of the vehicle.[55]

Refrigerants[edit]

Most refrigerants used for air conditioning contribute to global warming, and many also deplete the ozone layer.[56] CFCs, HCFCs, and HFCs are potent greenhouse gases when leaked to the atmosphere.

The use of Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) as a refrigerant was once common, being used in the refrigerants R-11 and R-12 and R 134 (sold under the brand name Freon-12). Freon refrigerants were commonly used during the 20th century in air conditioners due to their superior stability and safety properties. However, these chlorine-bearing refrigerants reach the upper atmosphere when they escape.[57] Once the refrigerant reaches the stratosphere, UV radiation from the Sun homolytically cleaves the chlorine-carbon bond, yielding a chlorine radical. These chlorine atoms catalyze the breakdown of ozone into diatomic oxygen, depleting the ozone layer that shields the Earth’s surface from strong UV radiation. Each chlorine radical remains active as a catalyst unless it binds with another chlorine radical, forming a stable molecule and breaking the chain reaction.

Prior to 1994, most automotive air conditioning systems used R-12 as a refrigerant. It was replaced with R-134a refrigerant, which has a lower ozone depletion potential. Old R-12 systems can be retrofitted to R-134a by a complete flush and filter/dryer replacement to remove the mineral oil, which is not compatible with R-134a.

R-22 (also known as HCFC-22) has a global warming potential about 1,800 times higher than CO2.[58] It was to be phased out for use in new equipment by 2010, and is to be completely discontinued by 2020. Although those gasses can be recycled when air conditioning units are disposed of, uncontrolled dumping and leaking can accidentally release those gas directly in the atmosphere.

In most countries[which?] the manufacture and use of CFCs has been banned or severely restricted due to concerns about ozone depletion (see also Montreal Protocol).[59] In light of these environmental concerns, beginning on November 14, 1994, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has restricted the sale, possession and use of refrigerant to only licensed technicians, per Rules 608 and 609 of the EPA rules and regulations.[60]

As an alternative to conventional refrigerants, natural gases, such as CO2 (R-744), have been proposed.[61] R-744 is being adopted as a refrigerant in Europe and Japan. It is an effective refrigerant with a global warming potential of 1, but it must use higher compression to produce an equivalent cooling effect.[citation needed]

In fact, in 1992, a non-governmental organization was spurred by corporate executive policies and requested that a European lab find a substitute. The result quickly led to two alternative mixes, one of propane (R290) and isobutane (R60Oa), and one of pure isobutane.[17][20] Corporate executives resisted change in Europe only until 1993, but in the U.S. until 2011, despite some supportive steps in 2004 and 2008 (see Refrigerant Development above).

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“IF” you want to learn english try this and watch the movie

*Teachers can make a class “FUN” never say the same thing to students,
never always say good morning, maybe if it is after lunch to see if the
hear you!!! Haaha and they turn and say “NO” teacher it is afternoon.
Always change your teaching ways. Never be the same. *

*IT IS NOT WHAT I TEACH YOU TODAY*

*IT IS WHAT YOU REMEMBER TOMMORROW!!!!*

1. wordpress.com <http://eslschoolforenglish.wordpress.com/>
2. alvindavis99.wordpress.com
3. alvinlesterdavis.wordpress.com

 

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NFL Black MEN arrested all the time “WHY”

NFL PLAYER ARRESTS: SHOWING 732 Record(s)

Date Team Name POS Case Category Description Outcome
2014-09-17 ARI Jonathan Dwyer RB Arrested Domestic violence Suspected of aggravated assault in incident involving woman.  Resolution undetermined.Black man
2014-09-11 MIN Adrian Peterson RB Indicted Child abuse Grand jury in Texas indicted Peterson on a charge of injury to a child. Resolution undetermined.Black man
2014-09-04 NYJ Quincy Enunwa WR Arrested Domestic violence Charged with simple assault after alleged incident with woman at hotel in Florham Park, N.J. Resolution undetermined.Black man
2014-08-30 SF Ray McDonald DE Arrested Domestic violence Suspected of domestic violence against pregnant fiance, who showed police bruising on her body. Resolution undetermined.Black man
2014-08-23 BUF Alan Branch DT Arrested DUI Accused of drunken driving, blood-alcohol content of 0.14, after police say they noticed him vomiting out of car door. Resolution undetermined. Team released him the next day.Black man
2014-08-20 PIT Le’Veon Bell RB Arrested Drugs Pulled over and suspected of marijuana possession with teammate LeGarrette Blount in passenger seat. Resolution undetermined.Black man
2014-08-20 PIT LeGarrette Blount RB Detained Drugs Was riding in passenger seat when police pulled over car driven by teammate Le’Veon Bell. Suspected of possessing bag with about 20 ounces of marijuana. Resolution undetermined.Black man
2014-08-11 WAS Bashaud Breeland CB Cited Drugs Cited for marijuana possession at gas station by police of Virginia Commonwealth University. Resolution undetermined.Black man
2014-07-23 JAX Justin Blackmon WR Arrested Drugs Pulled over for traffic violation in Oklahoma, accused of marijuana possession. Resolution undetermined.Black men
2014-07-20 STL Jo-Lonn Dunbar LB Arrested Battery Accused of getting into a fight with NBA free agent Donte Greene outside club in Miami Beach. Resolution undetermined.Black men
2014-07-18 PHI Keelan Johnson S Arrested Assault Accused of striking police officer, disordery conduct during disturbance at a bar in Tempe, Ariz. Resolution undetermined.Black men
2014-07-12 BAL Jimmy Smith CB Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of refusing to obey police orders during incident at a bar in Maryland. Smith said he was trying to help an intoxicated woman. Resolution undetermined.Black men
2014-07-07 MIN Jerome Simpson WR Cited Drugs Pulled over and suspected of marijuana possession, open container and violating terms of his driver’s license. Resolution undetermined.Black men
2014-07-05 CLE Josh Gordon WR Arrested DUI Accused of driving while impaired after being pulled over for speeding in Raleigh, N.C. Pleaded guilty, 60-day suspended sentence, $390 in fines and costs. NFL suspended for season, then reduced to 10 games.Black men
2014-06-29 ARI John Abraham LB Arrested DUI Accused of drunken driving after an officer found him passed out behind the wheel of his car outside Atlanta. Resolution undetermined.Black men
2014-06-20 CHI Cornelius Washington DE Arrested License Pulled over for speeding, accused of driving with a suspended license in Georgia. Paid fines.Black men
2014-06-09 KC Sean Smith CB Arrested DUI Accused of drunken driving after a police officer said he saw Smith drive his car into a pole in Kansas City. Resolution undetermined.Black men
2014-05-30 BUF Marcell Dareus DT Arrested Reckless driving Accused of crashing his Jaguar into a tree, drag racing and reckless endangerment in upstate New York. Resolution undetermined.Black men
2014-05-24 BAL Lorenzo Taliaferro RB Arrested Public intoxication Accused of destroying a taxi cab window in Virginia, being drunk in public. Resolution undetermined.Black men
2014-05-22 DEN T.J. Ward S Warrant Assault Accused of throwing a glass at a female bartender after being told he couldn’t buy at the strip club. Diversion program, four hours community service.Black men
2014-05-13 CAR Greg Hardy DE Arrested Domestic violence Police responded to call and reported that a woman accused Hardy of assaulting her and threatening her. Convicted by judge on assault charge, 18 months probation. Played first game of 2014 before being deactivated.Black men
2014-05-05 BUF Marcell Dareus DT Arrested Drugs Pulled over for speeding in Alabama, accused of felony drug possession. Resolution undetermined.Black men
2014-04-27 CHI Josh Morgan WR Warrant Assault Accused of simple assault, punching another man outside of a nightclub in Washington, D.C. Resolution undetermined.
2014-04-16 JAX Tandon Doss WR Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of refusing to listen to police orders after two men reported him to police and said Doss was following them in his car. Dropped after prosecutors declined to file charges.
2014-04-13 SF Aldon Smith LB Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of making a false bomb threat at Los Angeles airport after being selected for secondary screening. Dropped by prosecutors.
2014-03-31 CIN Orson Charles FB Arrested Gun Accused of brandishing gun in car in apparent road rage incident. Resolution undetermined.
2014-03-29 STL Greg Reid CB Arrested Probation violation Accused of undiclosed probation violation stemming from 2012 arrest after the car he was riding in was pulled over in Georgia for seatbelt violation. Resolution undetermined.
2014-03-28 SF Chris Culliver CB Arrested Reckless driving, weapon Accused of hitting a bicyclist with his vehicle, felony hit-and-run and possession of brass knuckles in San Jose. He allegedly threatened witness with brass knuckles. Resolution undetermined.
2014-03-21 TEN Adewele Ojomo DE Arrested Solicitation Accused of soliciting a prostitute in Miami for $100, busted by undercover cop. Resolution undetermined.
2014-03-09 BAL Jah Reid OL Arrested Battery Acccused of getting into a fight at an adult entertainment establishment in Key West, Fla. Resolution undetermined.
2014-02-21 BAL Deonte Thompson WR Arrested Drugs Accused of marijuana possession after Chevrolet SUV he was riding in was pulled over for driving without its headlights on. Resolution undetermined.
2014-02-20 WAS Fred Davis TE Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving in Tysons Corner, VA., after passerby called police to report a man apparently asleep in his Rolls-Royce. Resolution undetermined.
2014-02-18 ATL Roddy White WR Arrested Failure to Appear Pulled over for speeding in Georgia, accused of failing to appear on illegal window tint charge from a year earlier. Resolution undetermined.
2014-02-15 BAL Ray Rice RB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of striking his wife at Atlantic City casino, rendering her unconscious. She also is accused of hitting him. Diversion program. Two-game suspension, then indefinite suspension, cut by team.
2014-01-26 SF Daniel Kilgore OG Arrested Public intoxication Accused of being drunk in public in Kingsport, Tenn. Resolution undetermined.
2014-01-17 CLE Davone Bess WR Arrested Assault Accused of assaulting a law officer and disorderly conduct after bizzare behavior at airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Resolution undetermined.
2014-01-14 TB Akeem Spence DT Arrested Drugs Pulled over for speeding in Alabama, accused of marijuana possession after police dog searched car. Resolution undetermined.
2014-01-12 SEA Spencer Ware RB Arrested DUI Pulled over by Washington State Patrol, suspected of drunken driving in Seattle. Resolution undetermined.
2014-01-09 TB Michael Hill RB Arrested Resisting Arrest Accused of refusing to obey a lawful officer, disorderly conduct stemming from fight at bar in St. Joseph, MO. Resolution undetermined.
2014-01-01 MIN Erin Henderson LB Arrested DUI, drugs Accused of drunken driving for second time since November after allegedly crashing into trees in parking lot. Also accused of marijuana possession. Pleaded guilty to fourth-degree intoxicated driving, two years probation. Team released him next month.
2013-12-30 NYJ Kellen Winslow Jr. TE Charged Drugs Accused of possession of synthetic marijuana after police responded to a complaint of him in a parked car outside a Target store in New Jersey on Nov. 19. Resolution undetermined.
2013-12-29 SD Thomas Keiser LB Arrested Assault Accused of getting into a fight with another man outside a bar in downtown San Diego after chargers’ game. Resolution undetermined.
2013-12-22 CHI Henry Melton DT Arrested Assault, alcohol Accused of public intoxication and attacking an employee at a bar in Grapevine, Texas. Resolution undetermined.
2013-12-20 NYG Will Hill S Arrested Child support Arrested in New Jersey on warrant related to lack of child-support payments. Resolution undetermined.
2013-11-25 MIN A.J. Jefferson CB Arrested Domestic Violence Taken to jail by Eden Prairie police on probable cause of domestic assault. Resolution undetermined. Cut by team hours later.
2013-11-19 MIN Erin Henderson LB Arrested DUI Failed breath test during traffic stop, suspected of drunk driving with blood-alcohol measured at 0.11. He said police didn’t have grounds to stop his car. Pleaded guilty to careless driving, one year of probation, 40 hours community service.
2013-11-10 KC Dwayne Bowe WR Arrested Drugs Pulled over for going 48 mph in a 35-mph zone, accused of marijuana possession after police smelled odor and searched car. Resolution undetermined.
2013-11-09 MIN Jerome Simpson WR Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving after police responded to a report of a stalled vehicle. He failed sobriety tests. Resolution undetermined.
2013-11-01 ARI Lequan Jefferson TE Arrested DUI Police in Arizona stopped him after report of a collision. Blood-alcohol measured at .156. Resolutoin undetermined. Released by team within days.
2013-10-09 SF Aldon Smith LB Charged Gun Case stems from house party in June 2012, in which Smith was stabbed. Three felony counts of illegal possession of an assault weapon. Pleaded no contest, three years of probation, 235 hours of community service for this and DUI case.
2013-09-23 CIN Adam Jones CB Arrested Disorderly conduct He was the passenger in a car pulled over for speeding and was cited for disorderly conduct. The driver was charged with drunk driving. Resolution undetermined.
2013-09-20 SF Aldon Smith LB Arrested DUI, drugs Accused of drunk driving and marijuana possession after crashing his pickup truck in San Jose, Calif. Pleaded no contest, three years of probation, 235 hours of community service for this and other guns case.
2013-09-05 DEN Von Miller LB Cited License Pulled over for speeding in Arapahoe County, Colo., accused of driving with a suspended license. Second traffic issue in six weeks. Resolution undetermined.
2013-09-02 IND John Boyett S Arrested Public intoxication Accused of getting into an altercation with police, public intoxication and not departing a bar in Indianapolis when asked. Resolution undetermined. Team cut him the next day.
2013-08-28 DEN Julius Thomas TE Arrested Failure to appear Pulled over for speeding, charged with failing to appear in court for previous traffic ticket from Jan. 25, 2013. Resolution Undetermined.
2013-08-17 BUF Nigel Bradham LB Charged Drugs Pulled over for window-tint violation, charged with marijuana possession. Resolution undetermined.
2013-08-11 DEN Von Miller LB Arrested Outstanding warrant Arrested near Denver on warrant for failure to appear in court on previous traffic charges, including careless driving and driving without a license. Resolution undetermined.
2013-07-30 NYJ Joe McKnight RB Arrested Outstanding warrant Pulled over for speeding, he was accused of having outstanding warrants for previous unpaid traffic fines. Resolution undetermined.
2013-07-12 TB Eric Wright CB Arrested DUI Arrested in Los Angeles on suspicion of drunk driving. Previous DUI arrest on 7/2/12. Resolution undetermined. Wright traded to San Francisco a week later.
2013-07-11 NE Alfonzo Dennard CB Arrested DUI Pulled over around 2 a.m. in Lincoln, Neb., arrested on suspicion of drunk driving. Resolution undetermined.
2013-07-06 NYG Dan Connor LB Arrested Weapon Accused of having a switchblade in his luggage at Philadelphia airport. Charged with possession of offensive weapon. Resolution undetermined.
2013-06-29 IND Joe Lefeged S Arrested Gun Accused of fleeing police and multiple gun charges in Washington, D.C., including carrying unlicensed gun. Resolution undetermined.
2013-06-26 NE Aaron Hernandez TE Arrested Murder, gun Charged with first-degree murder in death of friend Odin Lloyd, five gun charges. Indicted and in jail without bail. Released by team.
2013-06-25 CLE Ausar Walcott LB Arrested Attempted murder Turned himself in after allegedly punching man in head outside night club. Pleaded not guilty, case pending. Released by team.
2013-06-12 PHI Jason Peters OT Arrested Resisting arrest Accused of drag racing and resisting arrest in Monroe, La. Pleaded guilty to lesser charges, including resisting officer by flight. Fined $656.50.
2013-06-10 CIN Adam Jones CB Arrested Assault Accused of punching a woman outside a Cincinnati bar on June 5. It is his eighth run-in with the law since 2005. Resolution undetermined.
2013-05-31 CHI Evan Rodriguez FB Arrested DUI Arrested for drunken driving after getting pulled over at 3:30 a.m. Resolution undetermined. Released by team month after arrest.
2013-05-30 TB Cody Grimm S Arrested Public intoxication Arrested in Virginia, where he was attending a wedding. Second arrest on same charge since March. Resolution undetermined.
2013-05-29 NO Joe Morgan WR Arrested DUI Arrested on drunken driving charge after being found asleep behind wheel on expressway in Louisiana Resolution undetermined.
2013-05-19 DEN Quentin Saulsberry C Arrested DUI Pulled over after 2 a.m., accused of drunken driving and lane violation in Arapahoe County, Colo. Resolution undetermined.
2013-05-17 NYJ Mike Goodson RB Arrested Drugs, gun Accused of marijuana possession and having an illegal gun with hollow-point bullets. Resolution undetermined.
2013-05-03 CLE Armonty Bryant DE Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving in Ada, Okla. Blood-alcohol content of .098. Resolution undetermined.
2013-05-03 ARI Daryl Washington LB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of assaulting ex-girlfriend, grabbing her by throat and shoving her to the ground. Resolution undetermined.
2013-04-29 NYJ Claude Davis DE Arrested Drugs Charged with marijuana possession after police saw occupied vehicle filled with smoke. Resolution undetermined. Released by team day after arrest.
2013-04-29 NYJ Cliff Harris CB Arrested Drugs Charged with marijuana possession after police saw occupied vehicle filled with smoke. Resolution undetermined. Released by team.
2013-04-21 BAL Rolando McClain LB Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of resisting arrest at park in Decatur, Ala., after police responded to report of disturbance Resolution undetermined. Retired month after arrest at age 23.
2013-04-20 DET Ronnell Lewis LB Arrested Public intoxication Charged with three misdemeanors, including disturbing the peace outside bar in Norman, Okla. Pleaded no contest to two misdemeanors, six-month deferred sentence, $400 in fines and costs.
2013-04-18 ATL William Moore S Arrested Domestic violence Accused of grabbing woman by shoulder in dispute, charged with simple battery. Resolution undetermined.
2013-04-17 CLE Quentin Groves LB Arrested Solicitation Accused of responding to sex-for-hire advertisement in prostitution sting. Pleaded no contest, apologized, paid $365.
2013-03-26 DET Amari Spievey S Arrested Domestic violence Accused of third-degree assault, risk of injury to a child and disorderly conduct in dispute with girlfriend about child support. Diversion program. Released from team in August.
2013-03-22 STL Trumaine Johnson CB Arrested DUI Accused of misdmeanor drunken-driving in Missoula, Montana. Resolution undetermined.
2013-03-21 CHI Evan Rodriguez FB Arrested Resisting arrest Accused of disorderly intoxication and resisting arrest after traffic stop in Miami. Charges dropped.
2013-03-10 TB Cody Grimm S Arrested Public intoxication Accused of public intoxication in Christianburg, Va. Deferred disposition.
2013-03-09 DEN Quinton Carter S Arrested Fraud Accused of felony cheating at craps in North Las Vegas casino. He allegedly placed $5 chips on table after dice rolled. Charges dropped.
2013-03-07 ARI Javarris James RB Arrested Failure to appear Accused of failing to appear in court to face previous marijuana possession charge. Resolution undetermined.
2013-02-24 OAK Desmond Bryant DT Arrested Criminal mischief Accused of misdemeanor mischief in Miami. Related lawsuit says he tried to break down door of house. Resolution undetermined.
2013-02-24 CHI J’Marcus Webb OT Arrested Drugs Charged with possession of a controlled substance, marijuana and paraphernalia in Pulaski County, Ill. Charges dropped.
2013-02-23 TEN Brandon Barden TE Arrested DUI Charged with drunken driving after single-car accident in Georgia. Car left road and flipped. Charge dropped.
2013-02-20 SF Al Netter OG Arrested DUI Charged with drunken driving in San Jose, Calif. Resolution undetermined.
2013-02-18 TB Da’Quan Bowers DE Arrested Gun Arrested at LaGuardia airport after allegedly packing gun into his carry-on bag. Pleaded guilty to reduced charge of disorderly conduct, fined $370.
2013-02-04 IND Moise Fokou LB Arrested DUI Charged with drunk driving for arrest in January in Washington D.C. Resolution undetermined.
2013-01-29 SEA Leroy Hill LB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of third-degree assault and unlawful imprisonment in dispute with girlfriend. Charges dropped for lack of evidence. Not re-signed by Seattle.
2013-01-22 DAL Jay Ratliff DT Arrested DUI Accused of drunken driving after crashing his Ford pickup truck into an 18-wheeler. Resolution undetermined.
2013-01-17 CIN Andre Smith OT Arrested Gun Accused of bringing loaded .38 pistol in carry-on bag at the Atlanta airport. Resolution undetermined.
2013-01-10 PIT Chris Rainey RB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of slapping girlfriend in face in dispute over cell phone. Pleaded no contest to disorderly conduct, $500 in fines and costs. Released by team hours later.
2013-01-08 OAK Rolando McClain LB Arrested False name Pulled over for window-tint violation in Alabama, accused of giving false name to police. Pleaded guilty to window-tint charge. Other charge dropped.
2013-01-04 CIN Robert Sands S Arrested Domestic violence Accused of assaulting his wife at their home in Florence, Ky. Wife treated at hospital for minor injuries. Released by team in June.
2012-12-08 DAL Josh Brent DT Arrested DUI Charged with intoxication manslaughter after flipping his car, killing teammate Jerry Brown. Police report blood-alcohol content at .189. Indicted on intoxication manslaughter. Retired from football. Free on bond, pending trial.
2012-12-01 KC Jovan Belcher LB Died Murder, gun Fatally shot his girlfriend 10 times, then drove to team facility and fatally shot himself in head. Suspect dead
2012-11-30 SF Demarcus Dobbs TE Arrested DUI Suspected of drunk driving and marijuana possession at 3:45 a.m. after crashing car on 25th birthday. Resolution undetermined.
2012-11-26 MIA Jonathan Amaya S Arrested Battery Accused of choking cab driver outside club in Miami Beach at 4:30 a.m. Resolution undetermined.
2012-10-31 NYJ Bryan Thomas LB Arrested Domestic violence Charged with assault on wife at their New Jersey home. He allegedly punched her in stomach. Probation, pretrial intervention program.
2012-10-30 TB Ahmad Black CB Cited Drugs Accused of having less than 20 grams of marijuana after being pulled over at 1:56 a.m. Resolution undetermined.
2012-10-14 PIT Alameda Ta’amu DT Arrested DUI Accused of resisting arrest, eluding police and drunk driving after hitting several parked cars Resolution undetermined.
2012-09-24 ATL John Abraham DE Arrested Obstruction Accused of obstructing police and firefighters who responded to a call about a woman threatening to jump from a building. Resolution undetermined.
2012-09-18 ATL Michael Turner RB Arrested DUI Charged with drunk driving just hours after scoring a touchdown in a win against Denver on Monday night. Resolution undetermined.
2012-08-25 SEA John Moffitt OG Arrested Disorderly conduct Banned from mall in Bellevue, Wash., in January 2012, he later was accused of trespassing there, obstrucing police and public urination. Pleaded no contest to disorderly conduct, $1,407 fine, two-year suspended jail sentence.
2012-08-11 MIA Chad Johnson WR Arrested Domestic violence Accused of head-butting the wife he married a month earlier. Pleaded no contest to misdemeanor domestic violence, probation. Cut by team.
2012-07-21 DET Aaron Berry CB Arrested Assault, gun Charged with simple assault during incident in which he brandished a gun. Released by team same week.
2012-07-20 TEN Kenny Britt WR Arrested DUI Charged with drunken driving after trying to pass through security gate at Fort Campbell Army post in Kentucky. Found not guilty of DUI, guilty of refusing Breathalyzer test.
2012-07-19 KC Donald Washington CB Arrested DUI, drugs Stopped for speeding by Illinois state police, who detected an odor of marijuana. Charged with DUI drugs. Resolution undetermined.
2012-07-16 DAL Dez Bryant WR Arrested Domestic violence Turned himself in after being accused by his mother of hitting her. Resolution undetermined.
2012-07-14 DEN Elvis Dumervil DE Arrested Assault, gun Accused of aggravated assault with a firearm in Miami after allegedly lifting his shirt to show a gun to a motorist. Charge dropped.
2012-07-14 SEA Marshawn Lynch RB Arrested DUI Pulled over in Oakland, Calif., and taken to Santa Rita Jail on DUI charge. Resolution undetermined.
2012-07-13 JAC Odrick Ray DE Arrested Traffic warrants Pulled over in Tulsa, Okla., for speeding and arrested for having outstanding traffic warrrants. Resolution undetermined.
2012-07-10 STL Robert Quinn DE Arrested DUI Charged with driving while intoxicated and two other traffic charges. Resolution undetermined.
2012-07-08 PHI Dion Lewis RB Arrested Reckless endangerment Charged with falsely reporting a fire and reckless endangerment. Police said he and his brother tried to knock down door at hotel. Charges dismissed.
2012-07-07 MIN Adrian Peterson RB Arrested Resisting arrest Arrested in downtown Houston on charge of resisting arrest at nightclub after he “assumed an aggressive stance.” Charge dismissed.
2012-07-07 STL Isaiah Pead RB Arrested Drugs Charged with marijuana possession in McKinney, Texas. Resolution undetermined. Suspended by league.
2012-07-02 TB Eric Wright CB Arrested DUI Charged with felony drunk driving in Los Angeles after being involved in an accident that caused an injury. District attorney declined to prosecute.
2012-07-01 CLE Kiante Tripp DT Arrested Burglary, gun Arrested in Georgia on suspicion of felony burglary after allegedly having gun and threatening people in an apartment. Resolution undetermined.
2012-06-23 DET Aaron Berry CB Arrested DUI Arrested on suspicion of drunk driving in Harrisburg, Pa., after slamming into parked cars. Diversion program.
2012-06-10 NYG David Diehl OT Arrested DUI Arrested on DUI charge in Queens, N.Y. after hitting parked cars. Blood-alcohol content of .18. Pleaded guilty to aggravated DUI, license restrictions, $1,200 in restitution.
2012-06-03 JAC Justin Blackmon WR Arrested DUI Arrested in Stillwater, Okla.,on DUI charge after traffic stop. Blood-alcohol three times the limit. Pleaded guilty, $500 fine, deferred sentence of one year.
2012-06-02 MIN Jerome Felton FB Arrested DUI Arrested on DUI charge in drive-thru lane at McDonald’s. Resolution undetermined.
2012-05-27 DET Nick Fairley DT Arrested DUI Arrested on DUI charge and eluding police in Mobile, Ala., after being pulled over for going 100 mph. Pleaded guilty in apparent plea deal that later came under question by judge.
2012-04-28 MIN Caleb King RB Arrested Assault Accused of third-degree assault in incident that put another man in the hospital with a skull fracture. Resolution undetermined. Released from team after the weekend.
2012-04-26 WAS Brandon Meriweather S Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding, charged with drunken driving after failing sobriety test in Arlington County, Virginia. Pleaded no contest, $300 fine, 180-day suspended jail sentence.
2012-04-07 OAK Darrius Heyward-Bey WR Arrested DUI Pulled over on Bay Bridge in California, charged with DUI. Pleaded no contest, three years’ probation, DUI classes.
2012-04-03 DET Nick Fairley DT Arrested Drugs Pulled over in Mobile, Ala., charged with marijuana possession after police found marijuna cigarettes. Charge dropped after he passed drug test.
2012-03-30 MIA Koa Misi LB Arrested Battery Police said he punched a man in the eye in California in 2011. Pleaded no contest to misdemeanor, three years’ probation.
2012-03-17 Free agent Samson Satele C Arrested Disorderly conduct Arrested at a shopping complext in Hawaii. He later signed with Indianapolis. Resolution undetermined.
2012-03-12 DET Mikel Leshoure RB Cited Drugs Charged with marijuana possession after traffic stop in Michigan, his second in a month. Pleaded guilty, $575 fine
2012-02-26 SEA Jarriel King OT Arrested Sex Charged with having forcible sex with woman in South Carolina who said she was intoxicated. Resolution undetermined. Released by team after it learned of the arrest.
2012-02-25 SEA Leroy King LB Arrested Drugs Accused of marijuana possession in Atlanta and report of strong odor coming from apartment. Charge dropped.
2012-02-23 JAC Nate Collins DT Arrested Drugs Accused of marijuana possession after traffic stop in Warrenton, Va. Police pulled him over because of his tinted windows. Resolution undetermined.
2012-02-18 DET Mikel Leshoure RB Cited Drugs Pulled over for speeding, charged with marijuana possession in Benton Township, Mich. Pleaded guilty to marijuana use, $485 fine.
2012-02-13 CHI J.T. Thomas LB Arrested Drugs Pulled over for going wrong way on one-way street. Police say they found marijuana. Resolution undetermined.
2012-02-08 SF Ray McDonald DE Arrested Outstanding warrant Pulled over in Sunnyvale, Calif., arrested on outstanding warrant from drunken driving case in 2010. Resolution undetermined.
2012-02-05 CIN Rey Maualuga LB Arrested Assault Charged with misdemeanor assault after bar employee said Maualuga hit him in the face. Charged dropped after private mediation.
2012-02-01 DEN Knowshon Moreno RB Arrested DUI Charged with drunken driving after being pulled over for speeding. License plate reportedly was “SAUCED.” Resolution undetermined.
2012-01-27 SF Aldon Smith LB Arrested DUI Accused of drunken driving in Miami Beach. Resolution undetermined.
2012-01-23 DET Johnny Culbreath OT Arrested Drugs Accused of marijuana possession at Comfort Inn in South Carolina. Convicted, paid $412 fine.
2012-01-19 CIN Jerome Simpson WR Indicted Drugs Accused of marijuana trafficking after 2.5 pounds of it were delivered to his home the previous September. Resolution undetermined.
2011-12-30 MIN Benny Sapp CB Arrested Assault Accused of fifth-degree assault and careless driving after dispute with security guard who tried to detain him at hospital. Resolution undetermined.
2011-12-14 CHI Sam Hurd WR Arrested Drugs Accused of accepting a kilogram of cocaine from undercover officer and trying to set up drug distribution network. Pleaded guilty to conspiracy to possess drugs with intent to distribute. Awaiting sentence.
2011-11-30 OAK Rolando McClain LB Arrested Assault, gun Accused of discharging a gun within city limits of Decatur, Ala., and putting a gun next to a man’s head in fight. Resolution undetermined.
2011-11-25 GB Erik Walden LB Arrested Domestic violence Jailed after complaint of felony assault against live-in girlfriend. Resolution undetermined.
2011-11-02 CAR Lawrence Wilson LB Arrested Drugs Pulled over for speeding, accused of having 11 grams of marijuana. Resolution undetermined.
2011-11-01 NE Julian Edelman WR Arrested Assault Accused of touching a woman inappropriately at a nightclub on Halloween night. Charges dropped.
2011-10-22 MIN Chris Cook CB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of domestic assault after neighbor called 911 to report argument. Acquitted. Team suspended without pay him after arrest.
2011-10-14 DEN Ryan McBean DT Arrested Stalking Accused of felony stalking, ordered to cease contact with victim. Resolution undetermined.
2011-10-01 GB Johnny Jolly DE Arrested Drugs Pulled over, accused of possessing narcotic containing codeine and tamperting with evidence to conceal it. Resolution undetermined.
2011-09-20 MIN Tyrell Johnson S Arrested DUI Accused of fourth-degree drunken driving with blood-alcohol content of 0.12. Resolution undetermined.
2011-09-02 DAL Kevin Ogletree WR Arrested Outstanding warrant Pulled over for speeding in Coppell, Texas. Police found two previous traffic violations unresolved. Paid $597 bond, car towed.
2011-08-07 MIN Rhett Bomar QB Arrested DUI Accused of third-degree drunk driving in Mankato, Minn. Resolution undetermined.
2011-08-02 DEN Matt Prater K Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving after allegedly backing his Chevy Trailblazer into parked car and fleeing the scene. Resolution undetermined.
2011-07-24 BUF Paul Hubbard WR Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving after his car hit a police officer. Blood-alcohol content measured at 0.08. Resolution undetermined.
2011-07-17 CIN Cedric Benson RB Arrested Assault Accused of misdemeanor assault after incident with former male roommate in Travis County, Texas. Resolution undetermined.
2011-07-17 IND Jerry Hughes DE Arrested Public intoxication Taken into custody around 2:30 a.m. at nightclub in Dallas with TCU teammates. Resolution undetermined.
2011-07-14 CIN Marvin White S Arrested Assault Accused of disturbing the peace and being verbally abusive at his child’s day care center. Resolution undetermined.
2011-07-10 CIN Adam Jones CB Arrested Alcohol Accused of disorderly conduct while intoxicated and resisting arrest at bar in Cincinnati. Resolution undetermined.
2011-07-09 PIT Hines Ward WR Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving in Georgia after being pulled over about 2:30 a.m. Pleaded guilty to reckless driving in plea deal. One year probation, $2,000 fine.
2011-06-29 TEN Kenny Britt WR Surrendered Outstanding warrant Turned himself in on two outstanding warrants that say he provided inaccurate information on driver’s license applications. Resolution undetermined.
2011-06-19 PHI Akeem Jordan LB Arrested Assault Accused of assasult and battery after incident at bar in Harrisonburg, Va. Resolution undetermined.
2011-06-18 DET Corey Williams DT Arrested DUI Pulled over in Arkansas for crossing center line, accused of drunk driving. Breath test measured his blood-alcohol level at .10. His attorney alleged racial profiling. Charge dropped by judge, according to court clerk.
2011-06-16 GB Brandon Underwood CB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of pushing wife to the ground and ripping necklace from her neck in Green Bay. Pleaded no contest to disorderly conduct, $767.50 in fines. NFl suspended two games. Released in September.
2011-06-16 SEA Raheem Brock DE Arrested Theft Accused of walking out on $27 restaurant tab in Philadelphia. He said they canceled order before food arrived. Acquitted.
2011-06-09 IND Javarris James RB Arrested Drugs Accused of misdemeanor marijuana possession in Florida. Resolution undetermined.
2011-06-08 TEN Kenny Britt WR Arrested Drugs Accused of resisting arrest in New Jersey after police suspected him of trying to hide a marijuana cigar. Resolution undetermined.
2011-05-22 CHI Garrett Wolfe RB Arrested Theft Accused of refusing to pay bill at Miami nightclub, resisting arrest and assaulting police. Charges dropped.
2011-05-09 TB Alex Magee DE Arrested Drugs Pulled over for driving with an expired tag on his 2009 black Dodge Charger, accused of marijuana possession. Resolution undetermined.
2011-05-06 SD Antwan Applewhite LB Arrested DUI Pulled over around 2:30 a.m. in San Diego, suspected of drunken driving. Resolution undetermined.
2011-04-26 WAS Albert Haynesworth DT Indicted Sex Charged with misdemeanor sexual abuse for allegedly fondling the breast of a worker in a Washington restaurant. Pleaded no contest to simple assault.
2011-04-19 ATL William Moore S Arrested License Accused of speeding, driving with a suspended license and failure to appear in court for a previous ticket. Resolution undetermined.
2011-04-12 TEN Kenny Britt WR Arrested Obstruction Accused of eluding police with car chase in his hometown of Bayonne, N.J., speeding and obstruction. Pleaded guilty to careless driving, $478 fine.
2011-04-04 KC Mike Vrabel LB Arrested Theft Accused of stealing alcoholic beverages from casino deli in Florence, Ind. Diversion agreement. Charge dropped if he stays out of trouble for 180 days.
2011-04-03 OAK Louis Murphy WR Arrested Drugs Pulled over in Gainesville, Fla., accused of possessing bottle of Viagra for which he had no prescription, resisting arrest. Resolution undetermined.
2011-03-29 TB Aqib Taliq CB Warrant Gun Police near Dallas issued warrant accusing him of firing gun near head of sister’s boyfriend. Charge dropped.
2011-03-26 PHI Jason Peters OT Arrested Disturbing the peace Accused with playing loud music, disturbing the peace in Shreveport, La. Resolution undetermined.
2011-03-25 GB Johnny Jolly DE Arrested Drugs Pulled over in Houston around 12:45 a.m., accused of having bottles of codeine, charged with intent to distribute. Charge dropped but pleaded guilty to 2008 drug charge, probation, jail time, drug treatment.
2011-03-19 DAL Bryan McCann CB Arrested Public intoxication Accused of public intoxication by Dallas police, which he denied. Resolution undetermined.
2011-03-17 OAK Mario Henderson OT Arrested Gun Pulled over in Fort Myers, Fla., and accused of carrying a concealed weapon an d playing music too loud. Resolution undetermined.
2011-03-12 MIN Chris Cook CB Arrested Gun Accused of brandishing a gun during an argument in Virginia with a neighbor. Charge dropped.
2011-03-04 PHI King Dunlap OT Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of reckless driving and disorderly conduct in Nashville after allegedly driving his Escalade onto sidewalk near arena. Resolution undetermined.
2011-02-12 SD Legedu Naanee WR Arrested Public intoxication Accused of public intoxication, resisting arrest after refusing orders to stay away from homicide scene in Indianapolis. Resolution undetermined.
2011-02-12 OAK Michael Bush RB Arrested DUI Suspected of drunk driving in Clarksville, Ind. Resolution undetermined.
2011-02-09 TEN Kenny Britt WR Charged Theft Accused of theft by deception after allegedly not paying two bail bonds companies in New Jersey on behalf of his friend. Resolution undetermined.
2011-02-02 WAS Albert Haynesworth DT Charged Assault Accused of punching motorist in Virginia in traffic altercation after the alleged victim made gesture at Haynesworth for tailgaiting. Charge dropped after settlement with alleged victim.
2011-01-31 MIN Everson Griffen DE Arrested Assault Pulled over near USC campus, subdued by Taser after allegedly assaulting officer during traffic stop. Pleaded guilty to reduced charge, $10,000 fine, three years probation.
2011-01-29 MIN Everson Griffen DE Arrested Public intoxication Accused of being drunk in public in Hollywood, Calif. Charge dropped.
2011-01-17 DEN Laurence Maroney RB Arrested Drugs, gun Pulled over in St. Louis, accused of unlawful possession of guns and drugs with other men. Acquitted.
2010-12-27 WAS Joe Joseph DT Arrested DUI Police responded to report of single-car accident, accused him of drunk driving around 3 a.m. Resolution undetermined.
2010-12-26 BAL Sergio Kindle LB Arrested DUI Pulled over on suspicion of drunk driving in Jessup, Md. Measured .17 on a Breathalyzer test. Pleaded guilty, two years probation, five days in a private facility.
2010-12-20 DEN Kevin Alexander LB Arrested Domestic violence Girlfriend accused him of shoving and striking her in the face. Charged with battery and assault. Charges dropped for a lack of evidence. Alexander cut by Broncos a day after arrest.
2010-12-13 TB Geno Hayes LB Arrested Disorderly conduct Charged after altercation outside Tampa nightclub in which police used stun gun on him. Pleaded no contest to trespassing, with ajudication withheld. Disorderly conduct charge dropped. Paid $265 in court costs.
2010-12-09 DEN Perrish Cox CB Arrested Sexual assault Accused of impregnanting woman after she passed out at his home. Acquitted.
2010-11-27 NO Will Smith DE Arrested Domestic violence Charged after police in Lafayette, La., observed him allegedly arguing with his wife and pulling her by the hair. Diversion program. Charges were dropped when Smith completed community service and counseling.
2010-11-19 TB Mike Williams WR Arrested DUI Pulled over on suspicion of drunken driving in Hillsborough County, Fla., despite Breathalyzer test showing legal blood-alcohol level. Charges dropped when urine test came back clean.
2010-11-13 SEA Raheem Brock DE Arrested DUI Pulled over by University of Washington police on suspicion of drunken driving. Measured .13 on a Breathalyzer test. Resolution undetermined.
2010-11-12 DEN D.J. Williams LB Arrested DUI Pulled over on suspicion on drunk driving in Denver at 2:40 a.m. Also cited for driving without headlights. Convicted of DUI and sentenced to 30 days home arrest.
2010-10-24 DEN Elvis Dumervil LB Arrested Assault Cited for assault, disturbing the peace after alleged altercation with parking lot attendant at Invesco Field after he forgot his credentials. Charges dimissed five days before scheduled trial.
2010-10-23 TB Jerramy Stevens TE Arrested Drugs Pulled over and cited for possession of marijuana, of which 38 grams were found in the car. Resolution undetermined. Cut by team two days after arrest.
2010-10-20 IND Pat McAfee P Arrested Alcohol Cited after he took a late-night swim in a canal and told police, “I am drunk.” Officers said he had a .15 blood-alcohol content. Diversion program in which he attended eight hours of community service and paid $298 fee. Suspended one game by the Colts.
2010-10-05 CAR Dwayne Jarrett WR Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding after 2 a.m. and arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence. Resolution undetermined. Cut by team same day of arrest.
2010-09-25 NE Bret Lockett DB Arrested Disorderly conduct Cited after police said he ignored their instructions to stay away from a club in Providence, R.I., that was filled to capactiy. Diversion program, charge dismissed after three months without incident.
2010-09-21 NYJ Braylon Edwards WR Arrested DUI Pulled over at 5:15 a.m. because police say his windows were too tinted; smelled of alcohol and blood-alcohol measured .16 Pleaded guilty to misdemeanor. Deal included $500 fine, driver’s license suspended for six months, entered into substance-abuse program.
2010-09-03 IND Fili Moala DT Arrested DUI Pulled over at 2:31 a.m. for speeding and cited with suspicion of driving under the influence. Blood-alcohol measured .10. Convicted of misdemeanor operating a vehicle while intoxicated with a blood-alcohol count of .08 to .15 and public intoxication. Sentenced to 180 days probation.
2010-08-08 CLE Gerard Lawson DB Arrested DUI Cited with suspicion of driving under the influence after hitting a parked car and leaving the scene. Pleaded no contest and sentenced to one year of probation, 72 hours of an alternative to jail program, 20 hours of community work service and $500 fine. Also had license suspended for six months.
2010-08-08 IND John Gill DT Arrested Alcohol Cited after found in a ditch on the side of the road, barefoot and slurring his speech. Charged dropped. Gill entered treatment facility.
2010-08-07 WAS Fred Davis TE Arrested Reckless driving Cited with reckless driving, driving 20 mph over the speed limit. Pleaded guilty to reduced charge of speeding, $75 fine.
2010-08-04 TEN Kenny Britt WR Cited License Pulled over in Nashville for windows in Camaro tinted too dark, then cited for misdemeanor driving without a valid license. Resolution undetermined.
2010-07-24 STL Jerome Murphy CB Arrested License Pulled over in Tampa for what said police said was loud music, charged with misdemeanor of driving without a valid license. Resolution undetermined.
2010-07-03 SEA Quinton Ganther RB Arrested DUI Pulled over on suspicion for two misdemeanor counts of driving under the influence in Sacramento. State limit for BAC is .08. Resolution undetermined.
2010-07-01 TEN Chris Simms QB Arrested DUI,drugs Charged in New York City with driving while on drugs (marijuana) with his pregnant wife in the car. Acquitted in May 2011
2010-07-01 CLE Robaire Smith DE/DT Arrested Gun Charged for November 2009 incident of possessing a firearm (Belgian 5.7) in Flint (Mich.) Bishop Airport, in his bag Resolution undetermined.
2010-06-29 CIN Cedric Benson RB Arrested Assault Charged with misdemeanor assault for a May 30 incident in Austin, Texas, where he allegedly punching a bar employee in the face. Pleaded no contest, 20-day jail sentence, $4,000 fine.
2010-06-16 TEN Derrick Morgan DE Arrested License Pulled over in northwest Georgia for speeding, charged with driving with a suspended license. Resolution undetermined.
2010-06-13 TEN Vince Young QB Cited Assault Accused of getting into a fight at a Dallas strip club and left before police arrived. Resolution undetermined.
2010-06-12 SF Ray McDonald DE Arrested DUI Pulled over in his black BMW when the California Highway Patrol clocked him at 94 mph in a 65-mph zone, given field sobriety test. Resolution undetermined.
2010-06-10 GB Brandon Underwood CB Arrested Sexual assault Charged with prostitution/non-marital sexual intercourse after two women alleged he sexually assaulted them in Lake Delton, Wis. Pleaded no contest to misdemeanor count of soliciting a prostitute, $379 fine.
2010-05-26 MIA Phillip Merling DE Arrested Domestic violence Charged with aggravated battery against his pregnant girlfriend in Weston, Fla. Charges dropped after girlfriend stopped cooperating with authorities.
2010-05-24 SD Kevin Ellison S Arrested Drugs Pulled over for speeding, charged with suspicion of possessing a controlled substance — 100 Vicodin pills — in Redondo Beach, Calif. Pleaded guilty to possession of controlled substance, charged later dropped through diversion program.
2010-05-23 NO Harry Coleman S Arrested Battery Charged with misdemeanor simple battery after allegedly shoving someone out of the way upon leaving tribal casino in Louisiana. Resolution undetermined.
2010-05-16 TB Mario Urrutia WR Arrested License Charged with non-resident driver’s license violation by Hillsborough (Fla.) County deputies. Resolution undetermined.
2010-05-08 DEN Ronald Fields DT Arrested Gun Pulled over in Houston upon witness seeing Fields waving a gun at a club, then driving off, charged with misdemeanor. Resolution undetermined.
2010-05-07 WAS Fred Davis TE Cited License Charged with driving with a suspended license, falsely identifying himself to police in Loudon County (Va.). Pleaded guilty, 30-day suspended sentence, fined $2,500
2010-05-04 CIN Maurice Purify WR Arrested Disorderly conduct Charged with misdemeanor disorderly conduct after scuffle at a Newport, Ky., nightclub. Charges dropped; one-game NFL suspension under personal conduct policy
2010-04-17 CLE Chris Jennings RB Arrested Assault Accused of hitting a bouncer outside a Cleveland nightclub. Never charged.
2010-04-10 SEA Leroy Hill LB Arrested Domestic violence Charged with investigation of assault in the fourth degree/domestic violence from dispute with girlfriend in Issaquah, Wash. Diversion program, 18-month probation, treatment program.
2010-04-07 WAS Fred Davis TE Arrested License Pulled over for speeding, found to be driving under a suspended/revoked license. Pleaded guilty, 10-day suspended sentence, $2,500 fine, driver’s license suspended 90 days.
2010-04-01 CLE Shaun Rogers DT Arrested Gun Charged at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport on felony count for carrying a handgun in his carry-on bag. Diversion program of 12 months, 10-hour weapons course, 40 hours community service, NFL fine.
2010-03-27 ARI Joey Porter LB Arrested DUI, assault Suspected of DUI and charged with assaulting an officer, resisting arrest after trying to help a friend who had been pulled over. Charges dropped; prosecutor did not believe jury would find Porter guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.
2010-03-19 MIA Ronnie Brown RB Arrested DUI Pulled over in Atlanta for failing to use a turn signal, then charged with DUI with reported blood-alcohol level at 0.158. Resolution undetermined.
2010-03-13 GB Spencer Havner TE Arrested DUI Arrested in Grass Valley, Calif., after crashing his motorcycle; taken to hospital, and found to be under the influence. Charges dropped, not enough evidence
2010-02-20 MIA Will Allen CB Arrested DUI Charged in Miami Beach after tried to get through police roadblock. Blood alcohol measured at .152 and .167. Resolution undetermined.
2010-02-19 WAS Byron Westbrook CB Arrested DUI Pulled over in Waldorf, Md., after his Mercedes crossed the center line several times, suspected of drunken driving. Acquitted by jury in June 2010.
2010-02-06 MIA Tony McDaniel DT Arrested Domestic violence Charged with misdemeanor battery at Davie, Fla., home, after shoving his girlfriend, whose head hit the pavenment. Pleaded no contest to amended charge of disorderly conduct, six months probation, counseling. NFL suspended him one game.
2010-02-02 DAL Deon Anderson FB Arrested Gun Accused of pulling loaded gun a man in dispute in Addison, Texas, also having outstanding traffic warrants. Resolution undetermined.
2010-01-30 KC Michael Richardson CB Arrested Alcohol One of hundreds charged with being in possession of an open alcohol container, at the Gasparilla Parade in Tampa. Resolution undetermined.
2010-01-29 CIN Rey Maualuga LB Arrested DUI Charged with drunk driving in Covington, Ky., after police said he struck two parked vehicles and parking meter. Blood-alcohol .157. Pleaded guilty, suspended seven-day sentence, two days’ probation. NFL fined him for two games.
2010-01-18 WAS Chad Rinehart OT Arrested Public intoxication Charged after police in Cedar Falls, Iowa, say he was pulling on the locked door outside a bar and refused a breath test. Found guilty by a judge, paid $195 fine
2010-01-17 SD Vincent Jackson WR Arrested License Pulled over for playing loud music, cited for driving with a suspended license and expired tags. Pleaded guilty to knowingly driving with suspended license , 80 hours community service, fined under $1,000.
2010-01-15 TEN Kenny Britt WR Arrested License Pulled over in Glen Ridge., N.J., an had three outstanding traffice warrants. Paid $865, released.
2010-01-10 TB Jermaine Phillips S Arrested Domestic violence Charged with third-degree felony domestic battery for allegedly strangling his wife at home in Tampa after she called 911. Diversion program.
2010-01-01 IND Taj Smith WR Arrested DUI Pulled over in Indianapolis after car crossed lane divider and was above 30 mph speed limit. Failed field sobriety, breath tests. Resolution undetermined.
2009-12-29 NO Bobby McCray DE Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding in New Orleans at 4:30 a.m., refused breathalyzer test, accused of drunk driving, driving without registration. Resolution undetermined.
2009-12-10 ATL Jonathan Babineaux DT Arrested Drugs Pulled over for a traffic violation in Gwinnett County, Ga., accused of marijuana possession. Pleaded no contest in misdemeanor plea deal, $1,500 fine, one year of probation.
2009-11-30 CAR Jon Beason LB Arrested Assault Accused of aggravated assault after a confrontation with a man in Charlotte strip club. Charges dropped.
2009-11-16 ATL Eric Weems WR Arrested DUI Pulled over in Dekalb County, Georgia, accused of drunk driving. Resolution undetermined.
2009-10-27 TB Marcus Johnson OG Arrested DUI Suspected of DUI after being found asleep in a Chevy Impala at 4 a.m. in Tampa, Fla., refused breath tests. Resolution undetermined. Cut by team less then 12 hours later.
2009-10-26 CLE Braylon Edwards WR Arrested Assault Charged with assault after allegedly punching a friend of LeBron James inside a Cleveland nightclub. Pleaded no contest to aggravated disorderly conduct, 180-day suspended sentence, $1,000 fine.
2009-10-18 PIT Jeff Reed K Arrested Alcohol Cited for resisting arrest, public intoxication in confrontation with police outside a Pittsburgh bar with teammate Matt Spaeth. Diversion program, 40 hours community service, then cleared.
2009-10-18 PIT Matt Spaeth TE Cited Public urination Cited for public urination outside a Pittsburgh bar. Teammate Jeff Reed was arrested as part of the same incident. Resolution undetermined.
2009-10-13 CHI Lance Louis OT Arrested Assault Charged with assault after beating a teammate in a meeting room while enrolled at San Diego State in November of 2008. Pleaded guilty to misdemeanor battery, 40 hours of community service, 12 hours anger management, three years probation.
2009-10-05 MIA Will Billingsley CB Arrested Domestic violence Charged with assault and nonviolently resisting arrest after argument over shoes with his girlfriend, who was found with scratches on her upper arm and neck. Case dropped after girlfriend said she wouldn’t pursue it. Cut by team two months later.
2009-09-07 DEN Richard Quinn TE Arrested Domestic violence Live-in girlfriend accused him of shaking her to the ground and taking away the phone during an argument in Denver. Charges dropped.
2009-09-06 SD Shawne Merriman LB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of battery and false imprisonment after allegedly choking and restraining his girlfriend, television personality Tila Tequila, in San Diego. Charges dismissed less than a week later.
2009-08-31 NO Usama Young S Arrested Failure to appear Stopped for speeding in New Orleans, arrested for failing to appear in traffic court for allegedly parking in a handicap spot. Resolution undetermined.
2009-08-30 MIN Cedric Griffin CB Arrested DUI Accused of drunken driving after voluntarily pulling, possibly because he felt he was too impaired to drive in Minnesota. Pleaded guilty to misdemeanor, two years probation, two days community service, $300 fine.
2009-08-23 BAL Tony Fein LB Arrested Assault Accused of assault after a confrontation with an officer in Baltimore who was investigating report of possible gun being passed around his group. Died in October 2009 before trial. Suspected gun turned out to be phone.
2009-08-21 TEN Chris Davis WR Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding in Nashville after 2 a.m., suspected of drunken driving. Consented to a breathalyzer test that measured 0.11 in blood alcohol content. Resolution undetermined. Cut by team a few days after arrest.
2009-08-20 TB Aqib Talib CB Arrested Assault Accused of battery and resisting arrest after allegedly hitting a cab driver in Tampa in the neck and ear. Diversion program, anger management course, civil settlement with driver.
2009-08-05 PHI Juqua Parker DE Arrested Drugs Pulled over for a traffic violation in Bethlehem, Pa., accused of marijuana possession as passenger in the car. Charges dropped after district attorney said the officer had no right to search the car.
2009-06-28 HOU Vonta Leach FB Charged Assault Charged with simple assault in July for an alleged confrontation with a man in a restaurant near Leach’s hometown of Lumberton, North Carolina. Resolution undetermined.
2009-06-20 SEA Owen Schmitt FB Arrested DUI Suspected of drunken driving after being seen by an officer weaving and following cars too closely in Black Diamond, Wa. Blood-alcohol measured at 0.151. Pleaded guilty to reckless driving, one-year suspended jail sentence, 24 hours community service, $2,130 fines and fees.
2009-05-26 ATL Quinn Ojinnaka OT Arrested Domestic violence Accused of tossing his wife down the stairs and throwing her out of the house after an argument over him contacting a girl on Facebook in Gwinnett County, Ga. Diversion program. NFL suspended one game.
2009-05-24 MIA Randy Starks DE Arrested Assault Arrested after allegedly swerving his vehicle to strike a police officer on foot and pin him up against another car. Charged with aggravated battery in Miami, Fl. Convicted of misdemeanor traffic violation, eight-hour traffic course, $219 fine.
2009-05-17 HOU Brandon Walker OG Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving in Norman, Okla., where he played college football. Resolution undetermined. Released by team two days later.
2009-05-14 BUF Corey McIntyre FB Arrested Indecent exposure Arrested two months after allegedly fondling himself outside of a woman’s home in Port St. Lucie, Fla. Charges dropped.
2009-05-10 HOU Brandon Walker OG Arrested Outstanding Warrant Warrant issued in Norman, Okla., after he failed to pay a ticket for driving without proper registration and proof of insurance. Resolution undetermined.
2009-05-06 TB Anthony Mix WR Arrested Sex Turned himself in after alledgedly having sex with a 15 year-old girl; the girl’s mother turned him in after seeing text messages between the two. Resolution undetermined. Cut by team day of arrest.
2009-05-03 NO Biren Ealy WR Arrested Alcohol Charged with lewd coduct, obscenity and disturbing the peace. Accused of being drunk, urinating in public and exposing himself to women with teammate. Resolution undetermined. Cut by team two days after arrest.
2009-05-03 NO Kolomona Kapanui TE Arrested Alcohol Charged with lewd conduct, obscenity and disturbing the peace. Accused of being drunk, urinating in public and exposing himself to women with teammate. Resolution undetermined. Cut by team two days after arrest.
2009-04-25 SD Shaun Phillips LB Cited Battery Cited for misdemeanor battery after a security guard at a San Diego hotel said Phillips punched him. Never charged. Civil settlement with guard.
2009-04-11 BUF Donte Whitner DB Arrested Disorderly conduct Police said they used Taser to subdue him at Cleveland club, charged him aggravated disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. Diversion program that included meetings with a probation officer for three months. Charges then dropped.
2009-04-05 CIN Leon Hall CB Arrested DUI Accused of drunken driving after being pulled over after 3 a.m. In Ohio. Breath test showed blood-alcohol content of 0.149. Pleaded guilty to reckless operation of a vehicle, 30-day suspended jail sentence, 64 hours community service, $250 fine.
2009-04-01 CLE Donte Stallworth WR Arrested DUI, manslaughter Accused of striking and killing a pedestrian with his car in Miami March 14. Blood-alcohol content measured .126. Charged with DUI manslaughter. Pleaded guilty, 24 days in jail, two years of house arrest, 1,000 hours of community service. NFL suspended for 2009.
2009-03-21 OAK Cornell Green OT Arrested Domestic violence Accused of slamming the mother of his two children against wall and striking her arm with mop handle. Arrested at Tampa airport after incident. Diversion program, classes, court costs.
2009-03-13 KC David Macklin CB Arrested DUI Pulled over after 3 a.m. in Newport News, Va., accused of drunken driving. Convicted, six-month suspended sentence, $250 fine. The team cut him five days after arrest.
2009-03-11 WAS Albert Haynesworth DT Indicted Reckless driving Grand jury indicted him on charges of misdemeanor reckless driving and expired registration. Accused of causing Dec. 13 accident that caused another motorist to crash. Pleaded no contest, three months of probation, 25 hours community service.
2009-03-09 JAC Matt Jones WR Arrested Alcohol Accused of violating terms of previous plea deal in cocaine case. He tested positive for alcohol consumption, leading to his arrest in Arkansas. Found guilty, six days in jail.
2009-03-01 DEN Brandon Marshall WR Arrested Domestic dispute Accused of disorderly conduct in Atlanta after fight with fiance. Charges dropped.
2009-02-14 PIT Jeff Reed K Cited Disorderly conduct Police said he broke towel dispenser in convenience store after finding it out of towels, also used profane language at employee. Pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct and criminal mischief, fined $543.50. Arrested again in October 2009.
2009-02-13 JAC Gerald Sensabaugh S Arrested License, guns Accused of driving with a suspended license in Kingsport, Tenn. He had three guns in his Bentley, but apparently had a permit for them. Resolution undetermined.
2009-02-11 BUF Marshawn Lynch RB Arrested Guns, drugs Police in Culver City, Calif., said they checked car without tags and smelled marijuana, then found gun in trunk, plus marijuana cigarettes. Pleaded guilty to misdemeanor gun charge, 80 hours community service, three years probation. No drug charge. NFL suspended him three games.
2009-02-11 JAC Reggie Williams WR Arrested DUI, drugs Pulled over in Houston at about 2 a.m., charged with drunken driving and possession of .97 grams of marijuana. Charges dropped.
2009-02-08 IND Darrell Reid DT Arrested Disorderly conduct Police said he refused to leave nightclub parking lot in Indianapolis, accused of disorderly conduct and trespassing. Resolution undetermined.
2009-02-05 KC Michael Merritt TE Arrested Drugs Police officer in Orlando said he saw him with a marijuana cigarette, leading to marijuana possession charge. Resolution undetermined. Released from team later that month.
2009-02-02 SF Roderick Green LB Arrested Guns, drugs, reckless driving Pulled over in Brenham, Texas, accused of unlawfully carrying a weapon, marijuana possession, reckless driving and interfing with police, all misdemeanors. Resolution undetermined.
2009-02-01 SD Jamal Williams DT Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding, accused of drunken driving but blood-alcohol content measured at under the legal limit of .08. Pleaded guilty to a lane-change violation and speeding, required to take traffic safety class.
2009-01-24 SEA Leroy Hill LB Arrested Drugs Accused of possessing less than an ounce of marijuana after being found asleep behind the wheel of his car at an intersection in Georgia. Pleaded guilty to marijuana possession, 12 months of probation, $500 fine.
2009-01-16 NO Jonathan Vilma LB Arrested Reckless driving Miami police said he resisted arrest after being spotting swerving his car and running red light. Charges dropped. Vilma agreed to give $1,000 to hospital trauma center.
2009-01-10 DAL Anthony Spencer LB Arrested Alcohol, disorderly conduct Bouncer at Indianapolis nightclub told police Spencer tried to punch him. Accused of public intoxication, disorderly conduct. Resolution undetermined.
2009-01-06 SD Vincent Jackson WR Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding and weaving, failed sobriety tests in San Diego, accused of drunken driving in 2008 GMC Sierra. Sentenced to four days in jail and five years of probation
2009-01-01 BUF Ko Simpson S Arrested Interfering with police Accused of hindering police in Rock Hill, S.C., when one of his friends was being arrested at bar. Police said Simpson proclaimed he was “worth millions.” Diversion program, at least 50 hours of community service.
2008-12-28 STL Gary Stills LB Arrested Child support Civil warrant issued for unpaid child support. Resolution undetermined.
2008-12-21 JAC Travarous Bain CB Arrested License Pulled over for speeding in Florida, accused of having suspended or revoked license. Resolution undetermined. Released from team a few days after arrest.
2008-12-07 CAR Jeremy Bridges OG Arrested Assault Accused of spraying champagne on restaurant patrons and making threats in Charlotte. Dropped.
2008-12-01 NYG Plaxico Burress WR Surrendered Gun Accidentally shot himself in thigh at New York club and did not have a permit for the pistol. Pleaded guilty to lesser weapons charge, two-year prison sentence, NFL suspension.
2008-11-29 NYJ Shaun Ellis DE Arrested Drugs Pulled over in Hanover, N.J., charged with marijuana possession, speeding and driving without insurance. Resolution undetermined.
2008-11-13 NYG Kareem McKenzie OG Arrested DUI Pulled over in New Jersey, accused of drunken driving after cutting through a gas station parking lot. Resolution undetermined.
2008-10-27 KC Larry Johnson RB Surrendered Assault Charged with simple assault, accused of spitting in a woman’s face at a nightclub in Kansas City. Pleaded guilty to two counts of disturbing the peace for this and other case. Two years probation.
2008-10-23 PIT Santonio Holmes WR Arrested Drugs Pulled over because police were looking for similar car, marijuana cigars found in his car by police. Dropped after prosecutors agreed the search warrant wasn’t specific enough.
2008-10-18 TB Matt McCoy LB Arrested DUI Pulled over near his home in Tampa after 4 a.m., accused of drunk driving. Resolution undetermined. Cut by team day of arrest.
2008-09-28 NYG Danny Ware RB Arrested Alcohol Accused of being a pedestrian under the influence of alcohol after standing in road talking in Athens, Ga. Resolution undetermined.
2008-09-15 ATL Lawyer Milloy S Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving, speeding after game in Atlanta. Resolution undetermined.
2008-09-14 OAK Tommy Kelly DT Arrested DUI Pulled over on suspicion of drunk driving in Oakland. Resolution undetermined.
2008-09-10 IND Ed Johnson DT Arrested Drugs Pulled over for speeding near Indianapolis, charged with marijuana possession. Resolution undetermined. Cut by team within a day of arrest.
2008-08-30 JAC Fred Taylor RB Arrested Disorderly conduct Forced out of car at gunpoint, accused of being uncooperative during search near nightclub in Miami Beach. Charges dropped.
2008-08-30 CAR Ricardo Colclough CB Arrested DUI Accused of driving while impaired just hours before team made its final cuts. Pleaded guilty to driving while impaired, 30-day suspended sentence. Released by team within a day.
2008-08-20 HOU Jameel Cook RB Arrested Drugs Pulled over, ticketed for license and registration issues, charged with marijuana possession. Charge dropped for marijuana possession.
2008-07-20 TB Donte Nicholson S Arrested Battery Scuffled with security guards at bar, shot with stun gun, accused of resisting arrest and battery. Resolution undetermined.
2008-07-10 JAC Matt Jones WR Arrested Drugs Accused of cocaine possession after being spotted by Arkansas police in parked car cutting up cocaine-like substance. Diversion program of drug treatment. Suspended by league for three games.
2008-07-08 GB Johnny Jolly DE Arrested Drugs Accused of having mixture containing codeine in his car after arrest outside Houston nightclub. Pleaded guilty to possession in plea deal that included probation, five years of deferred adjudication.
2008-06-30 NE Willie Andrews CB Arrested Domestic violence, gun Accused of pointing gun at girlfriend’s head, assault with a deadly weapon Resolution undetermined. Cut by team a day later.
2008-06-28 BAL Derrick Martin CB Cited Drugs Cleveland airport security personnel say they found marijuana packets on him at airport. Resolution undetermined.
2008-06-22 TEN Jevon Kearse DE Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving near Vanderbilt campus around 5 a.m., refused breath test. Pleaded guilty to reduced charge of reckless driving, six months of probation, restricted license.
2008-06-21 NYG Geoffrey Pope CB Arrested Assault Accused of hitting man in head with champagne bottle at club in Detroit. Charges dropped.
2008-06-18 ARI J.J. Arrington RB Arrested Disorderly conduct One of five arrested stemming from fight at nightclub in North Carolina. Resolution undetermined.
2008-06-15 NYG Ahmad Bradshaw RB Surrendered Probation violation Undisclosed probation violation stemming from undisclosed incident when he was a juvenile. Sentenced to two 30-day jail terms in Virginia.
2008-06-15 ATL Daren Stone S Arrested DUI Suspected of drunk driving in downtown Atlanta. Resolution undetermined.
2008-06-13 TEN Brandon Jones WR Arrested Gun Accused of carrying .32-caliber gun into Nashville airport. Diversion program of six months, $500 fine.
2008-06-07 CHI Cedric Benson RB Arrested DUI Accused of running a red light in Austin, Texas, suspected of drunk driving. Case dropped. Grand jury declined to indict.
2008-05-31 BUF Marshawn Lynch RB Charged Reckless driving Accused of hitting woman with his Porsche SUV in Buffalo and driving away. Woman required seven stiches for cut, plus hip bruise. Pleaded guilty to failure to exercise due care to pedestrian, license revoked, $150 fine and surcharge.
2008-05-30 JAC Gerald Sensabaugh S Arrested Reckless driving Accused of doing stunts on a motorcycle in Kingsport, Tenn. Resolution undetermined.
2008-05-20 NO Charles Grant DE Indicted Manslaughter One of several men charged in connection to shooting death of innocent pregnant woman, a bystander at club fight in Georgia. Pleaded to reduce charge of affray (public fighting), $20,000 restitution, $1,000 fine, probation.
2008-05-10 SEA Lofa Tatupu LB Arrested DUI Pulled over in Kirkland, Wash., for speeding. Police measured blood-alcohol content at .155 or more. Pleaded guilty, one day in jail, $1,255 fines and court costs.
2008-05-03 CHI Cedric Benson RB Arrested DUI Accused of boating while intoxicated and resisting arrest on Lake Travis, Texas. Case dropped. Grand jury declined to indict.
2008-05-03 ATL Michael Boley LB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of becoming physical with wife during argument at home in Dacula, Ga. Diversion program. NFL suspension of one game.
2008-05-01 CIN Ahmad Brooks LB Summoned Assault Accused of punching woman in left eye during dispute with neighbor in Kentucky. Accepted mediation.
2008-04-30 Free agent Darrion Scott DE Arrested Assault Accused of putting dry-cleaning bag over 2-year-old son’s head. After leaving Minnesota, he later signed with Washington Redskins. Pleaded guilty to child endangement.
2008-04-27 NE Nick Kaczur OT Arrested Drugs Pulled over for speeding, accused of having 202 OxyContin pills, charged with misdemeanor drug possession. Pleaded guilty to reduce charge of speeding, drug charge dropped in deal, $355 in fines and fees.
2008-04-26 DET Kalvin Pearson S Arrested Domestic violence Accused of aggravated battery of pregnant woman, domestic battery by strangulation, obstrucing officer in southwest Florida. Domestic charges dropped.
2008-04-21 IND Kenton Keith RB Arrested Alcohol Accused of refusing to leave nightclub parking lot being cleared by police, trespassing, public intoxication, disorderly conduct. Resolution undetermined.
2008-04-21 SEA Rocky Bernard DT Arrested Domestic violence Accused of hitting his girlfriend in the head at Seattle nightclub. Diversion program, agreed to have no contact with woman for two years, domestic violence treatment.
2008-04-13 SF Donald Strickland CB Arrested Alcohol Accused of running away from police in San Jose, public intoxication and resisting arrest. Resolution undetermined.
2008-04-11 MIA Reagan Mauia RB Arrested Battery Accused of knocking a man out in restaurant parking lot in Florida. Resolution undetermined.
2008-04-03 CLE Kenny Wright CB Arrested Drugs Accused of evading arrest by trying to outrun police in Texas, misdemeanor marijuana possession. Resolution undetermined. Cut by team a month after arrest.
2008-03-31 CIN Chris Henry WR Arrested Assault Accused of punching man and throwing beer bottle out of car window. Charge dropped.
2008-03-19 PIT Cedrick Wilson WR Arrested Domestic violence Accused of punching ex-girlfriend in the face, disorderly conduct at restaurant. Diversion program, anger counseling. Released by team the next day.
2008-03-16 HOU Jacoby Jones WR Arrested DUI Accused of drunken driving while stuck in Houston traffic. Pleaded guilty, diversion program, education classes, alcohol-detection device placed in car.
2008-03-15 TEN LenDale White RB Cited Disorderly conduct Accused of property destruction, disobedience to a lawful order and resistance stemming from party in hometown of Denver. Resolution undetermined.
2008-03-11 CAR Dwayne Jarrett WR Arrested DUI Police say he ran a red light and crossed center line, accused of drunken driving with blood-alcohol content of 0.12 near Charlotte. Pleaded guilty, surrended license, 24 hours of community service, $420 in court costs.
2008-03-08 PIT James Harrison LB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of hitting his girlfriend during argument about whether to baptize his son, simple assault, mischief. Charges dropped. He also underwent anger counseling.
2008-03-06 DEN Brandon Marshall WR Arrested Domestic violence Accused of hitting his girlfriend on March 4, misdemeanor battery. Acquitted. NFL suspended him one game.
2008-03-01 CLE Kenny Wright CB Arrested Drugs Pulled over for speeding in Texas, charged with misdemeanor marijuana possession. Resolution undetermined.
2008-03-01 DEN Marcus Thomas DT Arrested Drugs Pulled over in Florida, accused of cocaine possession after police said the found the drug and gun in truck. Charges dropped.
2008-02-26 NE Kevin Faulk RB Summoned Drugs Accused of possessing marijuana cigarettes at concert in Lafayette, La. Pleaded no contest, suspended jail sentence, probation, $300 fine, substance-abuse program.
2008-02-24 MIN Bryant McKinnie OT Arrested Battery Police report said he spit on nightclub security guard in Miami after being kicked out, accused of disorderly conduct, resisting arrest. Resolution undetermined. NFL suspended him four games.
2008-02-24 KC Larry Johnson RB Charged Assault Accused of pushing a woman’s head and Kansas City nightclub. Pleaded guilty to disturbing the peace for this and other incident, two years of probation, counseling.
2008-02-19 DEN Andre Hall RB Surrendered License Arrest warrant issued stemming from driving without valid license in Florida and not appearing in court afterward. Paid $513 bond.
2008-02-19 OAK Fabian Washington CB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of domestic battery in Florida after incident with girlfriend. Police observed “slight red marks” on her neck. Diversion program for first-time offenders. NFL suspended him one game.
2008-02-18 HOU Jerome Mathis WR Arrested Domestic violence Accused of choking pregnant, common-law wife in Texas. Charges dropped.
2008-02-17 BUF Roscoe Parrish WR Arrested DUI Pulled over around 4:30 a.m. in Miami, suspected of drunk driving. Resolution undetermined.
2008-02-16 PHI Mike Patterson DT Arrested Drugs Charged with marijuana possession after police said they found it in his car in New Jersey. Convicted of careless driving.
2008-02-13 NYG Antonio Pierce LB Summoned Animal neglect Accused of neglecting pitpulls after one was found severely underweight and suffering from illness. Pleaded guilty to neglecting pets, $1,300 fine.
2008-02-05 NE Willie Andrews CB Arrested Drugs Pulled over in Massachusetts, where police said they found a half-pound of marijuana and $6,800 in cash. Pleaded guilty to marijuana possession, no prison time.
2008-02-01 NYG Adrian Awasom DE Arrested DUI Pulled over about 3:10 a.m. in ARI, accused of extreme drunken driving two days before Super Bowl there.
2008-02-01 MIA Matt Roth DE Arrested Alcohol Accused of public intoxication, refusing to leave bar in Iowa. Pleaded guilty, paid $182 fine.
2008-01-14 JAC Brent Hawkins DE Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding, accused of drunken driving near Jacksonville after telling police he had three vodkas with orange juice. Pleaded guilty, $1,000 in fines, six months of probation, license suspended.
2008-01-11 DEN Daniel Graham TE Arrested Domestic violence Suspected of harrasing former girlfriend, who told law enforcement he struck a bedpost during argument about sale of home. Charge dropped.
2007-12-29 BAL Gerome Sapp S Charged Assault Teammate Joe Maese accused him of punching him at bar. Sapp then alleged similar charge against Maese. Charge dropped after the two decided not to testify.
2007-12-29 BAL Joe Maese LS Charged Assault Teammate Gerome Sapp accused him of second-degree assault at bar after Sapp did the same to Maese. Charge dropped after the two decided not to testify.
2007-12-28 JAC Stockar McDougle OT Arrested Battery Charged with battery on person 65 or older at landscaping company in dispute over interest on bill. Resolution undetermined.
2007-12-26 MIN Darrion Scott DE Cited Drugs Pulled over in West Virginia, cited for possession of 7.1 grams of marijuana. Resolution undetermined.
2007-12-13 MIN Dwight Smith S Cited Drugs Pulled over in Minneapolis, cited for marijuana possession. Pleaded guilty to obstructing traffic, and drug charge was dropped. Fined $200.
2007-12-08 DEN Todd Sauerbrun P Cited Alcohol, assault Cited for simple assault after incident outside restaurant involving a cab driver. Police said he was taken to detox facility. Pleaded guilty to distrubing the peace, 24 hours of community service, deferred judgment.
2007-12-01 DEN Darrell Hackney QB Arrested DUI Pulled over about 2:20 a.m., accused of drunk driving. Resolution undetermined.
2007-11-29 HOU Chester Pitts OG Arrested Resisting arrest Pulled over in Houston for making illegal left turn, Pitts was accused of driving away despite police orders. Charge dropped when grand jury declined to indict.
2007-11-19 TB Cato June LB Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding, accused of drunk driving in Tampa. Charge dropped.
2007-11-03 JAC Justin Durant LB Arrested Alcohol, resisting arrest Police said they found him in his car on road, charged him with possession of open container and resisting arrest. PENALTY FOR CRIME? Suspended two games.
2007-11-03 JAC Richard Collier OT Arrested DUI Police said they found him asleep at the wheel in McDonald’s drive-thru window, charged him drunk driving. Blood-alcohol 0.96. Pleaded no contest, six months probation, 50 hours community service, $650 fines and costs.
2007-10-23 STL Claude Terrell OG Arrested Domestic violence Charged with assaulting his wife at hotel, where she was found with “obvious signs of physical injury.” Pleaded guilty, 30 days in jail, deferred adjudication, $1,000 fine. Team cut him within a day.
2007-10-22 DEN Brandon Marshalll WR Arrested DUI Pulled over for driving erratically in Denver, charged with drunk driving. Blood-alcohol registered at .116. Pleaded guilty to reduced charge of driving while impaired, $1,100 fine, one year probation.
2007-10-12 WAS Kili Lefotu OG Arrested Alcohol, assault Charged with being drunk in public after conflict with patron at a restaurant. Also accused of assault and property destruction. Resolution undetermined.
2007-10-04 PIT Najeh Davenport RB Arrested Domestic violence In Cleveland custody dispute, he allegedly slapped and choked mother of his son, age 5. Also charged with child endangerment. Acquitted.
2007-09-29 JAC Khalif Barnes OT Arrested Reckless driving Police say he drove through a yard and crashed his Mercedes into a tree, then fled the scene. Charged with violating DUI probation. Charges dropped.
2007-09-05 CLE Leigh Bodden CB Arrested Resisting arrest Accused of failing to comply with police at Cleveland airport. Police said he drove backward on one-way street, resisted arrest and argued.. Acquitted.
2007-08-27 CHI Lance Briggs LB Charged Reckless driving Accused of crashing his Lamborghini into pole and leaving the scene of the accident. His car was discovered around 3:15 a.m. Pleaded guilty, one year court supervision, 120 hours community service.
2007-08-23 TB David Boston WR Arrested DUI Accused of drunken driving after being found asleep behind the wheel of his Range Rover on his way to the Tampa airport. Pleaded guilty to reckless driving in deal, 50 hours community service, six months probation.
2007-08-05 BUF Anthony Hargrove DE Arrested Resisting arrest Accused of breaking a police officer’s eyeglasses, resisting arrest and criminal mischief in scuffle outside nightclub. Pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct, 200 hours community service, $300 fine.
2007-07-26 CAR Jeremy Bridges OT Arrested Assault, gun Accused of pointing a gun at a female entertainer in parking lot of strip club. Found guilty, 60-day suspended jail sentence, 60 hours community service .
2007-07-17 ATL Michael Vick QB Indicted Dogfighting Grand jury indicted him and three others as part of criminal dogfighting enterprise. Pleaded guilty, 23-month jail sentence. He served 19 months. NFL suspension until 2009.
2007-07-14 MIA Chris Chambers WR Arrested DUI Accused of driving while impaired near Charlotte, failing sobriety tests. Pleaded guilty to speeding as part of plea deal. Blood-alcohol measured at 0.6, below limit.
2007-07-05 OAK Bryant McNeal DE Arrested Outstanding warrant Pulled over in South Carolina , arrested on outstanding warrant involving defrauding a pawn broker . He allegedly sold broker a car he did not own. Resolution undetermined. Released by team a week after arrest.
2007-07-03 SD Anthony Waters LB Arrested Assault Charged with simple assault after allegedly striking a fellow motorist who threw a rock at his windshield and broke it. Resolution undetermined.
2007-07-03 MIA Kelly Campbell WR Arrested Drugs Police approached his SUV in a “known drug area” of Atlanta, confiscated marijuana and Ecstasy pill. Released by team two days after arrest.
2007-06-28 STL Claude Wroten DT Arrested Domestic violence Accused of damaging property on LSU campus in argument with girlfriend, kicking down her door. Resolution undetermined.
2007-06-23 MIA Fred Evans DT Arrested Battery, resisting arrrest Police subdued him with a taser, accused him of battery on a police officer after dispute with taxi driver in Miami Beach. Pleaded no contest to resisting arrest, battery. Fined $1,310. Team released him within week.
2007-06-22 CHI Terry Johnson DT Arrested DUI Pulled over in Arizona for going 40 mph in a 25-mph zone, accused of being impaired “to the slightest degree.” Charge dropped after blood-alcohol content measured 0.72. Team released him three days after arrest.
2007-06-21 TEN Adam Jones CB Charged Coercion, gun Surrended in Las Vegas, charged with felony coercion in connection to strip club shooting that paralyzed a man. Pleaded no contest to conspiracy to commit disorderly conduct, agreed to testify against gunman. SENTENCE?
2007-06-17 GB Nick Barnett LB Arrested Battery Charged with battery after allegedly knocking out somebody’s drink and breaking cell phone at bar in Appleton, Wisc. Pleaded no contest to disorderly conduct in plea deal, deferred prosecution agreement.
2007-06-17 CIN Quincy Wilson RB Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of failing to heed police order to disperse from bar, where he was part of a wedding party in West Virginia. Charge dropped in exchange for staying out of trouble through Dec. 17.
2007-06-16 CLE Mike Mason WR Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of resisting arrest, disorderly conduct after not heeing police orders to leave club at closing time in Cleveland. Shocked with stun gun. Resolution undetermined.
2007-06-02 ATL Jimmy Williams CB Charged Drugs Accused by state police of marijuana possession in Virginia. Found guilty, license suspended six months, $146 in costs paid.
2007-05-20 DEN David Kircus WR Arrested Assault Accused of punching a man in his face at a party, breaking his facial bones. Pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault, two years probation, later held liable in civil case.
2007-05-20 NYJ Justin Miller CB Arrested Assault Accused of third-degree assault after swinging at a man but hitting a woman instead at New York nightclub. Resolution undetermined.
2007-05-18 CIN A.J. Nicholson LB Arrested Domestic Accused of hitting girlfriend in the eye, but she later recanted her statement, saying she hit herself with a phone. Diversion program. Charge dropped after 40 hours community service, other programs. Released by team three days later.
2007-05-10 PIT Richard Seigler LB Arrested Pimping Accused of persuading a woman to become a prostitute, living from earnings of prostitute in Las Vegas. Charges dropped in 2008. Released by team.
2007-05-09 BAL Steve McNair QB Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding, charged with being owner of car driven by drunk driver. McNair was a passenger in the car he owned. Charge dropped after driver pleaded guilty to reckless driving.
2007-05-05 JAC Ahmad Carroll CB Arrested Gun, drugs Police said he told he was carrying a gun after they questioned him about incident at an Atlanta restaurant. They also said they found pink pills in car. Resolution undetermined.
2007-04-19 MIN Ronyell Whitaker CB Arrested Outstanding warrant Accused of not appearing in court for previous reckless driving incident even though his attorney was there. Police later apologized. Charge dropped.
2007-04-15 MIN Cedric Griffin CB Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of getting into ruckus with bouncers and police after getting kicked out of Minneapolis club for letting his pants sag too low. Diversion program. Charge dropped if he stayed out of trouble and club, $1,000 in costs.
2007-04-01 TB Anthony Davis OT Arrested Disorderly conduct Charged with disorderly conduct in his hometown of Victoria, Va. Charge dropped.
2007-03-31 IND Darrell Reid DE Arrested Drugs Accused of marijuana possession in New Jersey after police said they saw small bag of it in the open door of his car. Resolution undetermined.
2007-03-29 TB Lionel Gates RB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of hitting pregnant woman in argument about whether he was father of her child. Diversion program, anger management course, $3,200 in restitution.
2007-03-26 DEN Brandon Marshall WR Arrested Domestic violence Charged with false imprisonment in dispute with girlfriend, accused of hitting her car window and blocking her taxi. Diversion program. Charge dropped if he completed anger management.
2007-03-25 CAR D’Anthony Batiste OG Arrested Gun After being pulled over for dark window tint, he was accused of carrying a concealed weapon. Charge dropped
2007-03-21 CIN Chris Henry WR Cited License Accused of driving with a suspended license, seat-belt violation and making an improper turn. Vehicle impounded. Resolution undetermined.
2007-03-19 NO E.J. Kuale LB Arrested Gun, drugs Accused of marijuana and illegal possession after his car was searched by police in Baton Rouge. Released by team two days later.
2007-03-19 JAC Gerald Sensabaugh S Arrested Gun Pulled over for speeding in his BMW, he was charged with carrying a firearm without a permit in Tennessee. Charge dropped on permit.
2007-03-18 MIA Joey Porter LB Arrested Battery Accused of punching Bengals’ offensive lineman Levi Jones at a blackjack table in Las Vegas. Pleaded no contest, $1,000 fine.
2007-03-13 SEA Jerramy Stevens TE Arrested DUI Pulled over in Scottsdale, Ariz., accused of extreme drunken driving, marijuana possession. Blood-alcohol measured at .204. Guilty on three counts, 12 days in jail, $3,160 in fines.
2007-03-10 JAC Charles Sharon WR Arrested Gun, drugs Accused of stealing a Glock gun and carrying a concealed weapon in Tampa after police approached his parked car and said they smelled marijuana. Resolution undetermined.
2007-03-04 PIT Deshea Townsend CB Arrested Assault Accused of taking part in brawl in Pittsburgh bar. Charged dropped for lack of evidence.
2007-03-04 STL Dominique Byrd TE Arrested DUI Pulled over in Los Angeles, accused of drunken driving. Pleaded no contest, three years of probation, alcohol treatment.
2007-02-27 ATL Michael Vick QB Cited Trespassing Accused of fishing in a private lake in Virginia. Charged dropped.
2007-02-20 IND Dominic Rhodes RB Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding, Rhodes was accused of operating a vehicle while intoxicated in Indiana. Pleaded guilty to reduced charge of reckless driving, $1,000 fine, two days in jail.
2007-02-19 ATL Jonathan Babineaux DT Arrested Animal abuse Accused of killing girlfriend’s pit bull in Georgia. Charge dropped after investigation determined it was self-defense.
2007-02-10 MIA Fred Evans DT Arrested Drugs Accused of marijuana possession in Colorado County, Texas. Pleaded no contest, $250 fine, one year deferred adjudication.
2007-01-22 CIN Johnathan Joseph CB Arrested Drugs Pulled over in Kentucky, where police accused him of marijuana possession in his backpack. Diversion program.
2007-01-06 SD Ryan Krause TE Arrested DUI Pulled over in Pacific Beach neighborhood of San Diego around 2 a.m., accused of drunken driving. Pleaded guilty, volunteer service of 32 ours, $1,756 in fines and costs.
2007-01-03 IND DeDe Dorsey RB Arrested Gun Pulled over for speeding, he is accused of carrying a pistol without a permit. Resolution undetermined.
2007-01-02 DET Ross Verba OG Arrested Outstanding warrant Pulled over for speeding in Wisconsin, he was arrested on warrant for writing bad checks in Las Vegas. Dropped after debt resolved,
2007-01-01 MIN Travis Taylor WR Arrested Assault Police used a Taser gun on him in scuffle outside Minneapolis nightclub. Accused of ignoring police orders and pushing an officer. Pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct, $1,000 fine, 48 hours community service, 90-day suspended sentence.
2006-12-18 SD Terrance Kiel S Cited Public urination Cited for relieving himself outside a club in San Diego. Charge dropped as he pleading guilty to other drug charges.
2006-12-14 CHI Terry Johnson DT Arrested Guns In police raid, police found six unregistered guns, which they said violated his previous probation stemming from a previous gun charge. Guilty of probation violation, served two months in jail, $2,500 fine. Suspended by NFL.
2006-12-09 CIN Deltha O’Neal CB Arrested DUI Pulled over at checkpoint near Cincinnati, he was accused of drunken driving. Pleaded guilty to reckless driving, $250 fine, $1,000 to MADD, three years of probation.
2006-12-04 STL Dominique Byrd TE Arrested Assault Accused of hitting nightclub patron in the face with a drinking glass and grabbign a woman’s buttocks. Pleaded guilty to two misdemeanors, two years probation, anger/alcohol treatment, $100,000 civil settlement.
2006-12-03 CIN Reggie McNeal WR Arrested Drugs, resisting arrest Accused of unruly behavior and resisting arrested after being denied entrance to Houston nightclub. Police also found sedative in his cigarette. Pleaded guilty, probation and fine.
2006-11-27 SD Cletis Gordon CB Arrested DUI Pulled over in San Diego after game against Oakland Raiders, accused of drunken driving. Charge dropped after blood-alcohol content measured below legal limit.
2006-11-25 NYJ Adrian Jones OT Arrested DUI Pulled over for lane-change violation in New Jersey, he was was accused of drunken driving. Blood-alcohol content measured at .22. Pleaded guilty to related charge. Driver’s license suspended. Fined $20,000 by team.
2006-11-19 SF Antonio Bryant WR Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding more than 100 mph in Lamborghini, accused of drunken driving in San Mateo, Calif. Refused sobriety test. Pleaded guilty to reckless driving, one year of probation, $1,312 fine.
2006-11-14 HOU Fred Weary C Arrested Resisting arrest Pulled over in Houston, he was Tasered by police and accused of resisting arrest. He later filed a civil rights suit against the police. Charges dropped.
2006-11-11 DAL Marcus Coleman S Arrested DUI Pulled over in Irving, Texas, accused of drunken driving. Resolution undetermined.
2006-11-10 JAC Khalif Barnes OT Arrested DUI After being pulled over, he accused police officer of racism and called Jacksonville a hick town. Accused of drunken driving, he later apologized. Pleaded no contest, six months probation, 50 hours community service, $650 fines and costs.
2006-11-05 BUF Donte Whitner S Arrested Domestic dispute Accused of harrassment in a dispute at his residence involving girlfriend. Charge dropped.
2006-10-26 TEN Adam Jones CB Cited Assault Accused of spitting in a woman’s face at Nashville nightclub. Charge dropped because of inconsistent testimony.
2006-10-26 TEN Robert Reynolds LB Arrested Domestic violence Charged with domestic violence and criminal damaging in a dispute with his wife, whom he was divorcing. Pleaded guilty to smashing cell phone and punching hole in a wall, $300 fine.
2006-10-22 JAC Bobby McCray DE Arrested Drugs Pulled over, accused of reckless driving and possession of a ydrocodone, a painkiller. Pleaded no contest to reckless driving, fined $1,000.
2006-10-09 SD Markus Curry CB Arrested Domestic violence Pulled over, accused of injuring the mother of his child in the Gaslamp District of San Diego. Charge dropped after witnesses failed cooperate. Team released him hours later.
2006-10-06 DET Kenoy Kennedy S Arrested DUI Pulled over in suburban Detroit, accused of drunken driving. Blood-alcohol content measured at .16. Pleaded guilty, 18 months probation, alcohol treatment, five days community service.
2006-10-03 BAL B.J. Sams WR Arrested DUI Pulled over by police, who said they smelled alcohol, charged with drunken driving, lane violation. Acquitted on DUI charge, found guilty of lane violation, $90 fine.
2006-09-27 DEN Sam Brandon S Surrendered Violating court order Warrant issued for alleged violatoin of restraining order and bond conditions stemming from arrest. Suspended two games for previous arrests.
2006-09-26 KC Jared Allen DE Arrested DUI Accused of second drunken-driving incident in five months. Also charged with speeding Pleaded no contest. NFL suspended him two games.
2006-09-26 SD Terrance Kiel S Arrested Drugs Federal drug authorities arrested him at Chargers facility, accused him of possessing and shipping codeine cough syrup. Pleaded guilty to felony and misdemeanor charges, 100 hours volunteer work. Died in 2008 car crash.
2006-09-25 CIN Odell Thurman LB Arrested DUI Pulled over, accused of drunk driving. Pleaded no contest, $250 fine, license suspended, 90-day suspended jail sentence.
2006-09-03 SD Steve Foley LB Arrested DUI Shot by off-duty cop who followed him home and suspected him of driving drunk. Blood-alcohol level measured at .16. Pleaded guilty to misdemeanor, five years probation, alcohol testing, $1,756 fine. Never played again.
2006-09-02 JAC Brian Williams CB Arrested DUI After partying, he was pulled over and accused of drunken driving. Police said he smelled of alcohol. Acquitted at trial after first pleading no contest.
2006-08-26 MIN Dwight Smith S Arrested Sex Accused of indecent conduct after being found with woman in a hotel stairwell in Minneapolis. Pleaded guilty, $1075 in fines and costs, 16 hours of community service.
2006-08-25 TEN Adam Jones CB Arrested Public intoxication Accused of being drunk, shouting profanities and arguing with a woman outside club in Tennessee. Charges dropped on the condition he stays out trouble for six months.
2006-08-15 MIN Koren Robinson WR Arrested DUI Accused of fleeing police and drunk driving after leading police on a high-speed chase in Minnesota. Pleaded no contest to felony in plea deal, 90-day jail sentence for probation violation stemming form previous DUI.
2006-08-12 TEN Randy Starks DT Surrendered Domestic violence Accused of beating fiancee, who lost some fingernails in the scuffle. Diversion program. Charge dropped if he undergoes counseling.
2006-08-06 PIT Barrett Brooks OT Arrested Evading police Police said he recklessly drove his motorcycle, drove through stop signals and led them on a chase. Resolution undetermined.
2006-08-05 CIN Eric Steinbach OG Arrested DUI Accused of drunken boating in Cincinnati, refusing breath test. Diversion program, 10 hours community service, safe boating class.
2006-07-22 CHI John Gilmore TE Arrested Drugs Accused of refusing to leave bar in Chicago. After his arrest, police said they discovered marijuana. Resolution undetermined.
2006-07-22 CIN Matthias Askew DT Arrested Resisting arrest Accused of refusing police orders, parking violations, resisting arrest and obstruction of police business in Cincinnati. He was subdued by Taser. Acquitted, he also won $500,000 award in civil lawsuit over incident. Cut by team three weeks after incident.
2006-06-25 NE Johnathan Sullivan DT Arrested Drugs, gun Pulled over after police said he ran stop signs, accused of marijuana possessions. Sullivan gave police his gun during arrest and had permit for it. Charge dropped.
2006-06-23 TEN Cortland Finnegan CB Arrested DUI Pulled over, refused breath test and accused of drunk driving. Pleaded guilty to reckless driving, six-month suspended sentence, 20 hours of community service.
2006-06-22 NO Jammal Brown OT Arrested Domestic violence Accused of domestic battery in Louisiana after his wife called 911. Charge dropped.
2006-06-21 CIN Frostee Rucker DE Charged Domestic violence Accused of fighting girlfriend at party in Los Angeles. Pleaded no contest to vandalism and false imprisonment, three years of probation, 750 hours of community service.
2006-06-20 PHI Jabar Gaffney WR Charged Gun Pulled over for driving erratically in New Jersey, charged with unlawful possession of a gun. Diversion program.
2006-06-19 PIT Santonio Holmes WR Arrested Domestic violence Mother of his children called 911 and said Holmes choked her and slammed her into a door in Ohio. Charge dropped after woman was reluctant to testify.
2006-06-14 CIN Chris Henry WR Surrendered Alcohol Accused of providing alcohol to minors in hotel room he rented in Covington, Ky. Pleaded guilty, two days in jail, with rest of 90-day jail sentence suspended.
2006-06-13 IND Cato June LB Arrested Failure to appear Accused of failing to appear in court on charge of driving with a suspended license. Resolution undetermined.
2006-06-12 SD Vincent Jackson WR Arrested DUI Pulled over in San Diego, charged with drunk driving. Blood-alcohol measured at .13. Pleaded guilty, $1,750, five years of probation.
2006-06-03 CIN Chris Henry WR Arrested DUI Pulled over in Cincinnati for speeding, accused of drunk driving. Blood-alcohol measured at .09. Pleaded guilty to reckless operation of a vehicle, $250 fine, 30-day suspended sentence.
2006-06-01 CIN A.J. Nicholson LB Charged Theft Accused of stealing electronic equipment from former Florida State teammate. Pleaded no contest to burglary and theft, two months in a work program, two years of probation
2006-05-27 PIT Santonio Holmes WR Arrested Disorderly conduct One of hundreds of partiers arrested and accused of disorderly conduct in Miami Beach over Memorial Day weekend. Fined $250 and charge dropped.
2006-05-26 GB Cory Rodgers WR Arrested Gun Accused of firing a gun outside a nightclub in Fort Worth, Texas. Pleaded guilty to reduced charge in plea deal, 80 hours community service, 15 months of probation.
2006-05-26 DEN Karl Paymah CB Arrested DUI Police said they found him asleep behind the wheel of his Land Rover off the road near Denver while vehicle was still running. Found guilty of driving under the influence, 24 hours of community service, $542 fine, alcohol treatment.
2006-05-18 WAS Ataveus Cash WR Arrested License Pulled over in Washington, D.C., he was accused of driving without a valid license. Fined an undiclosed amount and released.
2006-05-16 MIA Keith Traylor DT Arrested DUI, drugs Pulled over in Oklahoma, accused of drunk driving, possession of a controlled substance and breaking smoke detector at jail. Sentenced to one year of probation, one year deferred sentence, paid $100 to replace smoke detector.
2006-05-13 SEA Wayne Hunter OT Arrested Assasult Police said Hunter and his brother got into a scuffle at a sports bar, knocked over a table and slammed a man down. Resolution undetermined. Released by team later that week.
2006-05-12 TEN Albert Haynesworth DT Surrendered Reckless driving Warrant issued after anoter motorist said Haynesworth tried to run him off the road with his truck. Charge dropped.
2006-05-12 CLE Reuben Droughns RB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of shoving his wife to the ground and locking her outside at his home near Denver. Charge dropped.
2006-05-11 KC Jared Allen DE Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding, accused of drunk driving in Overland Park, Kansas. Diversion program that barred him from drinking, but he later got arrested again in 2006.
2006-04-23 CHI Ricky Manning CB Arrested Assault Accused of beating man at a Denny’s restaurant near the UCLA campus. Pleaded no contest, 100 hours of community service, three years of probation. NFL one-game suspension.
2006-04-21 SD Steve Foley LB Arrested Battery, alcohol Officers approached his car and accused him of resisting arrest, public intoxication and battery on officer in scuffle with police. Charge dropped.
2006-04-14 SD Shaun Phillips LB Arrested Resisting arrest Accused of obstructing police after an officer said he saw him pull a woman’s head back by her hair in downtown San Diego. Charge dropped.
2006-04-11 SEA Bryce Fisher DE Arrested Domestic violence Accused of twisting his wife’s arm behind her back in a dispute. Charge dropped.
2006-03-26 PHI Dhani Jones LB Charged Disorderly conduct Accused of not obeying a command to stop dancing in the street outside a Miami nightclub. Pleaded no contest, paid court costs and sentenced to withheld adjudictation.
2006-03-23 TEN Adam Jones CB Charged Drugs Accused of smoking marijuana after he emerged from Corvette reeking of marijuana. Officers were serving a warrant on his home in Georgia. Charge dropped.
2006-02-18 PIT Trai Essex OT Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of resisting an officer and disorderly conduct outside club in Miami. Charge dropped.
2006-02-17 GB Ahmad Carroll CB Arrested Assault Accused of slapping the hand of an officer and disorderly conduct at a bar. Pleaded no contest to misdemeanor, $700 fine.
2006-02-15 MIA Damion McIntosh OT Arrested Domestic violence Accused of pushing his wife at their home and causing her to hit her head. Charge dropped for lack of evidence.
2006-02-12 CHI Terry Johnson DT Arrested Assault Accused of aggravated assault, threatening police and resisting arrest at nightclub in Chicago. Charges dropped.
2006-02-06 TEN Adam Jones CB Arrested Drugs Accused of throwing a punch at an officer and marijuana possession in Fayetteville, Ga. He had been in his parked Bentley. Pleaded no contest to obstructing police, three years of probation, $500 fine.
2006-01-28 CIN Chris Henry WR Arrested Gun Accused of raising a gun in a fight outside of a club in Orlando, Fla. The gun had been listed as stolen. Pleaded guilty to concealed weapons charge, 100 hours of community service, two years of probation.
2006-01-19 KC Greg Wesley S Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of threating to hit a bouncer at bar in Kansas City. Charge dropped after bouncer failed to testify.
2006-01-15 SEA Sean Locklear OT Arrested Domestic violence Accused of grabbing his girlfriend in dispute after getting upset with her for dancing with another man at a club. Diversion program, community service.
2006-01-09 JAC Reggie Williams WR Arrested Drugs Pulled over for running a red light, accused of marijuana possession, driving with a suspended license. Diversion program, community service.
2005-12-30 DAL Terry Glenn WR Cited Disorderly conduct, alcohol Accused of public intoxication and urinating behind dumpster at fast-food restaurant. Resolution undetermined.
2005-12-15 MIN Bryant McKinnie OT Charged Disorderly conduct, sex One of four Vikings accused of taking part in “love boat” ride on Lake Minnetonka with naked dancers and sex acts, disorderly and lewd conduct. Pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct and being a public nuisance, 48 hours community service, $1,000 fine.
2005-12-15 CIN Chris Henry WR Arrested Drugs Pulled over for speeding in Covington, Ky., accused of marijuana possession. Pleaded guilty, $250 fine, a month in drug rehab.
2005-12-15 MIN Daunte Culpepper QB Charged Disorderly conduct, sex One of four Vikings accused of taking part in “love boat” ride on Lake Minnetonka with naked dancers and sex acts, disorderly and lewd conduct. Charge dropped.
2005-12-15 MIN Fred Smoot CB Charged Disorderly conduct, sex One of four Vikings accused of taking part in “love boat” ride on Lake Minnetonka with naked dancers and sex acts, disorderly and lewd conduct. Pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct and being a public nuisance, 48 hours community service, $1,000 fine.
2005-12-15 MIN Moe Williams RB Charged Disorderly conduct, sex One of four Vikings accused of taking part in “love boat” ride on Lake Minnetonka with naked dancers and sex acts, disorderly and lewd conduct. Found guilty of disorderly conduct, 30 hours community service, $300 fine.
2005-11-25 KC Lionel Dalton DT Arrested Domestic violence Accused of domestic battery in incident with his wife on Thanksgiving. Charged dropped when she did not testify.
2005-11-09 NO Fakhir Brown CB Arrested DUI Pulled over in San Antonio, accused of driving while intoxicated. Charge dropped.
2005-11-01 CLE Reuben Droughns RB Arrested DUI Pulled over in Ohio, accused of speeding, failing breath test and drunk driving. Blood-alcohol measured at .08. Acquitted at trial.
2005-10-31 SD Derreck Robinson DE Arrested DUI Accused of drunken driving after police heard single-car crash into center divider on interstate highway near La Mesa, Calif. Guilty, six-month suspended sentence, five years of probation, $1,850 fine.
2005-10-26 NO Courtney Watson LB Arrested DUI Pulled over in San Antonio, accused of driving while intoxicated and having an open alcohol container. Pleaded no contest, probation, $1,365 fines and costs.
2005-09-26 MIN Bryant McKinnie OT Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of getting into a scuffle and refusing to leave a gas station and deli in Minneapolis. Charge dropped.
2005-09-26 MIN Marcus Johnson OG Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of getting into a scuffle and refusing to leave a gas station and deli in Minneapolis. Charge dropped.
2005-09-23 DEN D.J. Williams LB Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving in Douglas County, Colo. Pleaded guilty to impaired driving, probation, 24 hours of community service.
2005-09-13 TB Torrie Cox CB Arrested DUI Pulled over after police said his 2005 Dodge Magnum was drifting. Police said they smelled alcohol and accused him of drunk driving. Pleaded no contest, community service, alcohol treatment.
2005-09-12 KC Larry Johnson RB Charged Domestic violence Accused of domestic abuse in scuffle with his girlfriend at a bar. Police said he shoved her to the floor. Charge dropped after woman declined to testify.
2005-08-28 MIN Kevin Williams DT Arrested Domestic violence Accused of domestic assault in dispute with his wife at his home. Pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct, $1,000 fine, one year of probation.
2005-08-17 KC Lawrence Tynes K Arrested Battery Accused of breaking a bouncer’s nose in a fight in a bar in River Falls, Wis. Pleaded to a reduced charge, fined $397.
2005-08-15 BAL B.J. Sams WR Arrested DUI Pulled over, accused of drunk driving in Maryland. Pleaded to charge of driving while impaired, probation.
2005-08-14 KC Greg Wesley S Arrested Disorderly conduct, alcohol Accused of getting into drunken confrontation with police at Minneapolis hotel along with teammate Junior Siavii. Diversion program, $500 in costs.
2005-08-14 KC Junior Siavii DT Arrested Disorderly conduct, alcohol Accused of throwing objects, getting into drunken confrontation with police at Minneapolis hotel along with teammate Greg Wesley. Pleaded guilty to causing “assault fear,” 80 hours of community service.
2005-07-15 ATL Rod Coleman DT Arrested Disorderly conduct Pulled over for speeding in DeKalb, Ga., accused of getting irritated at police and asking, “Do you know who I am? I play for the Falcons.” Pleaded no contest to disorderly conduct, $1,000 fine, six months of probation.
2005-07-13 TEN Adam Jones CB Surrendered Assault Accused of assault and vandalism after being asked to leave club in Nashville. Charges dropped after nightclub manager said he didn’t want to pursue it.
2005-07-10 MIA Randy McMichael TE Arrested Domestic violence, alcohol Witnesses said he gave his wife a bloody nose in Georgia. He acknowledged drinking and was accused of battery and criminal trespass. Pleaded guilty to criminal trespass, three months of probation, $500 fine.
2005-07-04 DEN Sam Brandon S Arrested Domestic violence Accused of third-degree assault and causing property damage in domestic incident in Douglas County, Colo. NFL suspended him two games in 2007.
2005-06-25 DET David Kircus WR Arrested DUI Pulled over in Ottawa County, Mich., for driving erratically, accused of drunk driving. Blood-alcohol at .15. Pleaded guilty to misdemeanor, $850 in fines and costs, one day in jail with credit for time served.
2005-06-23 MIA Quintin Williams S Arrested DUI Pulled over near team practice facilility after being clocked at 111 mph, accused of drunk driving and drag racing. Pleaded guilty to reckless driving, six months of probation and cut by the team a day later.
2005-06-11 CHI Terry Johnson DT Arrested Gun Police found a loaded 9mm gun in his car he was driving outside a nightclub. Pleaded guilty to gun charge, $2,500 fine, 18 months of probation, 40 hours of community service.
2005-06-04 IND Nick Harper CB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of hitting his wife several times. Diversion program.
2005-06-04 WAS Sean Taylor S Arrested Gun, assault Accused of assault and pointing a gun in a confrontation over his all-terrain vehicles. Pleaded no contest to two misdemeanors, 18 months of probation, $1,000 to schools.
2005-05-29 DET Kalimba Edwards DE Arrested Resisting arrest Pulled over my Michigan state police, accused of resisting arrest and failing to produce a driver’s license. Police pepper-sprayed him. Pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct, $820 in fines and costs, one year of probation.
2005-05-29 IND Mike Doss S Arrested Gun Accused of firing a gun outside a restaurant in Akron, Ohio. Pleaded guilty to carrying a concealed weapon and discharging a gun in city limits, 40 hours community service.
2005-05-20 CLE Kellen Winslow Jr. TE Cited Reckless driving Accused of disregarding safety in motorcycle accident near his home. He tore up his knee in the accident, causing him to miss the season. Pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor charge, fined.
2005-05-12 TEN Tyrone Calico WR Cited Sex Accused of having sex with a woman in the back seat of his Escalade. Charge dropped.
2005-05-06 SEA Koren Robinson WR Arrested DUI Pulled over in Seattle suburb, accused of drunk driving. Blood-alcohol of .191 Pleaded guilty, two years probation, one day in jail, fined $2, 137.
2005-04-25 GB Ahman Green RB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of domestic abuse in argument with his wife, who called the authorities on him. Diversion program, 100 hours community service, violence counseling.
2005-03-18 JAC Tommy Hendricks LB Arrested Violating court order Accused of violating restraining order by calling his ex-wife. Team released him a week later.
2005-03-14 TEN Brad Hopkins OT Arrested Domestic violence Accused of assaulting his wife. Pleaded guilty, one year probation, $10,000 donation to charity, anger management course, one-game suspension.
2005-03-04 ARI Larry Ned RB Arrested Theft Accused of stealing another traveler’s computer at an airport security checkpoint. Released by team immediately.
2005-03-01 TB Dwight Smith S Arrested Gun Accused of pulling a pellet gun on fans who approached him in the drive-thru line at a McDonald’s. Charged with aggravated assault. Charge dropped.
2005-02-24 MIN Kelly Campbell WR Arrested Gun, drugs Pulled over and accused of marijuana possession and a gun that was reported stolen. Pleaded to charge in deal with prosecutors.
2005-02-17 TEN Tank Williams S Arrested DUI Pulled over in Nashville after police said he failed to fully stop at stop sign, accused of drunken driving. Pleaded guilty to reckless endangerment, required to complete alcohol safety program.
2005-02-14 TEN Samari Rolle CB Arrested Domestic violence In Valentine’s Day dispute with his wife, he was accused of assaulting here. She was treated for a cut above her eye. Diversion program, $10,000 donation to battered women, counseling and probation.
2005-02-04 NYG Frank Walker CB Arrested Gun, stolen possession Accused of possesing a stolen vehicle in Atlanta, where police said they also found a gun for which he had a permit. Charges dropped, described as a misunderstanding by Walker.
2005-01-21 CHI David Terrell WR Arrested Violating court order Accused of showing up four hours later to his court date on license and traffic violations. Pleaded guilty to driving on a suspended license, six months of probation, $1,050 fine.
2005-01-01 IND Montae Reagor DT Surrendered Harassment Accused of harassing and threatening the life of telephone to former girlfriend in Colorado. Resolution undetermined.
2005-01-01 DEN Willie Middlebrooks CB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of beating up his girlfriend after his girlfriend called police and said he struck her and choked her at home near Denver. Pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault, nine months of domestic violence classes, 18-month deferred sentence.
2004-12-20 OAK Charles Woodson S Arrested Alcohol Briefly jailed in downtown Oakland after allegedly refusing to leave a woman’s car around 4 a.m., accused of being drunk in public. Charges dropped.
2004-12-20 OAK Marques Anderson S Arrested Alcohol Briefly jailed in downtown Oakland after allegedly refusing to leave a woman’s car around 4 a.m., accused of being drunk in public. Charges dropped.
2004-12-15 CAR Todd Sauerbrun P Arrested DUI Pulled over in Charlotte, accused of speeding and drunk driving. Pleaded guilty to driving while impaired, $100 fine, one year of probation, 30-day driving ban in state.
2004-12-04 TB Torrie Cox CB Arrested DUI Pulled over in Tampa about 3 a.m., accused of drunk driving. Pleaded guilty to reckless driving, probation, benched.
2004-12-03 HOU Bryan Pittman C Arrested DUI Accused of driving while intoxicated. Acquitted.
2004-11-16 CHI David Terrell WR Arrested Reckless driving Pulled over in Chicago, accused of reckless driving, driving with a suspended license and failure to yield. Pleaded guilty to driving on a suspended license, six months of probation, $1,050 fine.
2004-11-16 CLE Paul Zukauskas OG Arrested DUI Pulled over in Ohio, accused of drunk driving and failing sobriety tests. Acquitted. NFL suspended him one game.
2004-11-06 ATL Matt Schaub QB Surrendered Assault Accused of being one of three men to assault a man in Virginia outside a campus restaurant. Acquitted by judge.
2004-10-28 WAS Sean Taylor S Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding, accused of drunk driving and refusing to take a breath test in Virginia. Acquitted.
2004-10-22 CAR Jarrod Cooper S Arrested False information Pulled over in North Carolina, accused of providing false information to police. Resolution undetermined. Team released him within a week.
2004-10-19 MIA David Boston WR Arrested Assault Accused of punching an airline ticket agent who wouldn’t let him board a plane at an airport in Burlington, Vt. Pleaded no contest, fined $500 and $211 in restitution.
2004-10-05 CIN Justin Smith DE Arrested DUI Pulled over for weaving near Dayton, Ohio, accused of drunk driving. Blood-alcohol content measured at .152. Pleaded guilty, three-day weekend intervention, $300 fine, $94 in court costs.
2004-09-20 KC Eric Warfield CB Arrested DUI Pulled over in Overland Park, Kan., accused of drunk driving, his third DUI arrest. Blood-alcohol measured at .189. T Pleaded no contest to felony, 80 days of house arrest, 10 days in jail, $1,500 fine, suspended four games.
2004-07-18 NE Marquise Walker WR Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving in Tampa, Fla., after rear-ending another car. Blood-alcohol measured at .179. Team released him within a week.
2004-06-29 MIA Randy McMichael TE Arrested Domestic violence In Fort Lauderdale, Fla., he was accused of hitting his wife, who was six months pregnant. Charge dropped.
2004-06-27 JAC Chris Naeole OG Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of getting into a shoving match with employees at a bar in Jacksonville Beach, he was subdued by police using a Taser. Charge dropped.
2004-06-27 ARI Wendell Bryant DT Arrested DUI Pulled over in Madison, Wis., accused of several traffic violations and drunk driving. Pleaded no contest, $660 in fines and court costs, driver’s license suspended for six months, suspended four games.
2004-06-06 MIN E.J. Henderson LB Arrested Assault Accused of assaulting a man outside a nightclub in the Minneapolis Warehouse District along with two teammates. Charge dropped.
2004-06-06 MIN Mike Nattiel LB Arrested Assault Accused of assaulting a man outside a nightclub in the Minneapolis Warehouse District along with two teammates. Charge dropped.
2004-06-06 MIN Steve Farmer TE Arrested Assault Accused of assaulting a man outside a nightclub in the Minneapolis Warehouse District along with two teammates. Charge dropped.
2004-06-03 KC Cliff Crosby CB Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of screaming and swearing at police in Erie, Pa., after being stuck in traffic. Pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct, $125.50 in costs, 25 hours of community service.
2004-06-02 DEN Sam Brandon S Arrested Domestic violence Accused of misdemeanor child abuse and criminal mischief in domestic dispute. Charges dropped.
2004-05-25 DET Brock Marion S Charged Theft Accused of bilking his car insurance company out of $54,000 by falsely claiming his car was stolen in 2003. Pleaded no contest, four years probation, $54,000 in restitution, $10,000 to the American Red Cross.
2004-05-06 HOU Marcus Coleman S Arrested DUI Accused of hitting a curb with his Mercedes, failing a sobriety test and drunk driving in Houston. Found guilty by jury, three days in jail, $2,000 fine and a one-year suspension of his driver’s license.
2004-04-27 NO Jay Bellamy S Arrested DUI Pulled over about 12:50 a.m., accused of drunk driving in his 2002 Cadillac. Resolution undetermined.
2004-04-24 STL Leonard Little DE Arrested DUI Pulled over about 3:45 a.m. near St. Louis, accused of speeding and drunk driving. He previously drove drunk in 1998 accident that killed a woman. Acquitted on drunk-driving charge by jury, convicted of speeding.
2004-04-20 BAL Corey Fuller CB Arrested Gambling, gun Accused of hosting lucrative card games at his house, where police raid found him carrying a holstered gun. Acquitted by jury. He had a permit for the gun.
2004-04-17 NE Ty Law CB Arrested Resisting arrest Police tried to stop his Rolls-Royce for a lance violation in Miami before he sped away. Charge dropped.
2004-04-10 MIN E.J. Henderson LB Arrested DUI Pulled over in Interstate 95 in Maryland, accused of drunk driving. Convicted, two years of probation, $1,020 in fines and costs, ordered to attend shock trauma tour at hospital.
2004-04-03 IND Joseph Jefferson CB Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving after driving his Chevrolet Impala into a ditch in Indiana. Blood-alcohol measured at .15. Pleaded guilty, sentenced to 30 days in jail before he sought a new attorney and new trial.
2004-03-15 GB Joe Johnson DE Arrested Violating court order Accused of contempt of court after not showing up for a hearing on marijuana charge from May 2003. Resolution undetermined. Bond doubled to $3,375 after hearing with the judge.
2004-03-02 NYG David Tyree WR Arrested Drugs Pulled over for speeding in New Jersey, accused of having a half pound of marijuana in his car with intent to distribute. Pleaded to a reduced charge, probation, treatment, night in jail.
2004-02-25 BAL Jamal Lewis RB Indicted Drugs Federal indictment accused him of drug dealing and cocaine possession in Atlanta. Pleaded guilty to using a cell phone to set up a drug deal, sentenced to four months in prison, suspended two games.
2004-02-15 TEN Jason Gesser QB Arrested DUI Pulled over in Honululu for running a red light, accused of drunk driving. Pleaded guilty, 14 hours of alcohol abuse classes, $150 fine, $307 in court fees, 30-day license suspension.
2004-02-02 CIN Levi Jones OT Arrested Obstruction Accused of trying to take a baton from a police officer in a melee outside a club in Houston. Charge dropped.
2004-01-14 SF Jeff Garcia QB Arrested DUI Pulled over in San Jose, accused of drunk driving. Blood-alcohol measured at .219. Pleaded guilty, three years of probation, $1,491 fine, eight days of community service.
2003-12-05 KC Larry Johnson RB Charged Domestic violence, gun Accused of brandishing a gun during a dispute with his girlfriend, felony aggravated assault. Diversion program, 120 hours of community service in exchange for dropping the case. Anger-management class.
2003-12-02 CIN James Lynch FB Arrested Public intoxication Accused of public urination, resisting arrest, eluding police and driving with a suspended license. Police used chemical irritant to subdue him. Pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct, two years of probation, 10 days in jail.
2003-11-18 MIN Kenny Mixon DE Arrested DUI Pulled over in Deephaven, Min., accused of drunken driving. It was his third drunken driving arrest in the county in 16 months. Found guilty, 216 hours of community service, 30 days in the county workhouse, 60 days house arrest.
2003-11-17 IND Joseph Jefferson CB Arrested DUI, gun Accused of drunken driving in Bowling Green, Ky., after police saw him driving in a parking lot. He also had a gun on the passenger seat. Pleaded guilty to driving with a suspended license.
2003-11-17 MIN Kevin Williams DT Arrested DUI Pulled over in Edina, Min., accused of drunk driving. Blood-alcohol measured at .14. Pleaded guilty to careless driving, $300 fine, 30-day suspended sentence.
2003-10-27 CLE William Green RB Arrested DUI, drugs Pulled over, accused of drunk driving and having a bag of marijuana in his car. Blood-alcohol measured at .165. Convicted, sentenced to three days in jail in February. NFL suspension of four games.
2003-10-26 JAX T.J. Slaughter LB Arrested Assault, gun Accused of aggravated assault after two teens said he pointed a gun at them on a highway in verbal dispute. Police found the gun in his car. Diversion program. Released by team a day later.
2003-10-21 NE Kenyatta Jones OT Arrested Assault Accused of throwing a cup of hot water on his house guest. Pleaded no contest, one year of probation. Team released him five days later.
2003-10-11 ATL Juran Bolden CB Arrested Theft, drugs Accused of driving stoken 2000 GMC Denali vehicle, possession of marijuana in Atlanta. Pleaded no contest to felony possession of stolen vehicle, misdemeanor stolen tags, three years probation, $3,000.
2003-10-07 CHI Rabih Abdullah RB Arrested DUI Police said his SUV rolled over and gave him a concussion, accused him of drunk driving. Pleaded guilty to DUI, sentenced to one year of probation, #1,344 fines and costs.
2003-10-01 NYJ John Abraham DE Arrested DUI Accused of refusing a sobriety test, drunk driving after crashing Hummer into fire hydrant in Baldwin, N.Y. Pleaded guilty to reduced charge of driving while impaired, fined $330, benched by team for one game.
2003-09-20 OAK Sebastian Janikowski K Arrested Assault, alcohol Accused of misdemeanor assault, vandalism and public drunkenness after fight at supper club in Walnut Creek, Calif. Charges dropped for lack of evidence.
2003-09-16 CAR Jarrod Cooper S Arrested DUI, drugs Pulled over for speeding, accused of drunk driving, possession of a controlled substance (Xanax) without a prescription. Pleaded guilty to driving while impaired, one year deferred sentence, one year probation, four-game NFL suspension.
2003-09-14 SD Matt Wilhelm LB Arrested DUI Police suspected him of drunk driving in San Diego. He acknowledged making a mistake. Found guilty, five years probation, $1,700 fine, 180-day suspended jail sentence.
2003-09-10 BUF Rodney Wright WR Arrested DUI Accused of refusing breath test, drunk driving, driving without a license and unsafe lane changes after three-car accident in which three were hurt. Resolution undetermined. Released by team within hours.
2003-08-21 SD Leonardo Carson DT Arrested Burglary, assault On leave from team to attend his grandfather’s funeral, he was accused of breaking into a woman’s apartment and assaulting her in Mobile, Ala. Pleaded guilty, sentenced to 30 days in jail.
2003-08-18 BAL Chris McAlister CB Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving in Northern Virginia, forcing him to miss team practice. Charge dropped for lack of evidence.
2003-07-25 MIN Mike Nattiel LB Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving in Minnesota just hours before he was to report to the start of training camp in Mankato. Pleaded guilty to careless driving, 30-day suspended sentence, one year of probation.
2003-07-15 SEA Wayne Hunter OT Arrested Domestic violence Accused of assaulting his pregnant girlfriend, who had been carrying for eight months. Diversion program. Domestic-violence counseling.
2003-07-12 MIN Bryant McKinnie OT Arrested Obstruction Accused of interfering with police in Miami, where he played college football. Charge dropped.
2003-07-04 DEN Dwayne Carswell TE Arrested Domestic violence Accused of choking and biting his girlfriend outside a nightclub in Atlanta and also obstructing police. Pleaded guilty to batter, one year of probation, one-game NFL suspension.
2003-05-31 TB Michael Pittman RB Arrested Domestic violence Police said he rammed his Hummer into his wife’s Mercedes, which was carrying his 2-year-old child and a babysitter in Phoenix. Pleaded guilty to felony endangerment, 14 days in jail.
2003-05-25 WAS Jermaine Haley DT Arrested DUI Pulled over in Miami, accused of drunk driving and property damage after hitting another car with his Land Rover. Pleaded no contest to reduced charge of reckless driving, one year probation, ordered to donate $3,000.
2003-05-22 GB Joe Johnson DE Arrested Drugs Pulled over in Georgia after police saw his hazard lights flashing in a turn lane, accused of marijuana possession. Resolution undetermined. He later failed to show up for court on the charge.
2003-05-22 NYG Keith Hamilton DT Arrested Drugs Pulled over for window-tint violation, accused of cocaine and marijuana possession. Pleaded guilty to cocaine possession, three years of probation, 1,000 community service, retired from NFL.
2003-05-22 TEN Steve McNair QB Arrested DUI, gun Pulled over in Nashville, accused of drunk driving. Police also found pistol in his Lincoln Navigator. Charges dropped after the judge said police didn’t have sufficient reason to stop him.
2003-05-03 HOU Ramon Walker S Arrested Alcohol Accused of public intoxication and trespassing at a nightclub in Houston after he and a friend denied entry around midnight. Resolution undetermined.
2003-04-27 WAS Bruce Smith DE Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding in Virginia Beach, accused of drunk driving and failing a sobriety test. Blood-alcohol measured at .07. Acquitted by judge.
2003-04-16 TB Dwight Smith S Arrested Gun Accused of flashing a gun at another motorist in Clearwater, Fla., during traffic dispute. Pleaded guilty to brandishing gun, 25 hours of community service, one year of probation, $225 fine.
2003-04-03 SEA Jerramy Stevens TE Arrested DUI Pulled over in Medina, Wash., for rolling through a stop sign, accused of drunk driving. Blood-alcohol measured at .14. Pleaded guilty to reckless driving, two days in jail, 25 hours of community service, $1,000 fine.
2003-03-29 BAL Terrell Suggs LB Charged Assault Accused of felony aggravated assault after a fight near Phoenix stadium. Suggs claimed he was hit over the head with an iron rod. Acquitted by jury. He had a permit for the gun.
2003-03-13 KC Eric Warfield CB Arrested DUI Accused of failing to maintain a single lane and drunk driving in Overland Park, Kan. Pleaded no contest, 175 days of parole, two days in jail, three days under house arrest.
2003-02-14 DAL Peppi Zellner DE Arrested Drugs Accused of cocaine possession, intent to distribute, after police in Georgia said they saw a package thrown from his car. Charge dropped after his brother took responsibility.
2003-02-01 SEA Koren Robinson WR Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of being unruly and failing to disperse after being told to leave the street outside a crowded nightclub in Durham, N.C. Resolution undetermined.
2003-01-14 DAL Dwayne Goodrich CB Charged Manslaughter Accused killing two people in hit-and-run accident while speeding in BMW. The victims had been trying to help pull another driver from a burning car. Convicted, sentenced to 7.5 years in prison, released on parole in 2011.
2003-01-04 CHI Damon Moore S Arrested DUI Accused of driving wrong way on highway ramp in Columbus, Ohio, drunk driving, causing minor accident. Blood-alcohol measured at .18. Found guilty, community service, released from team in April 2003.
2003-01-03 MIN Kenny Mixon DE Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding shortly after 3 a.m., accused of drunken driving, refusing sobriety test. Acquitted by jury.
2002-12-28 DEN John Mobley LB Arrested DUI Accused of speeding and driving drunk south of Denver. He failed a sobriety test. Convicted, sentenced to seven days in jail, 100 hours of public service, two years probation.
2002-11-28 CAR Lamar Smith RB Arrested DUI Pulled over by a state trooper in Mecklenburg County, accused of driving while impaired, speeding and reckless driving. Resolution undetermined. Team placed him on paid leave the next day and released him in March 2003.
2002-11-22 CAR Steve Smith WR Arrested Assault Accused of striking teammate Anthony Bright in a team film meeting. Bright ended up on the hospital and required facial surgery. Diversion program, anger counseling, one-game suspension by team.
2002-11-20 CAR Chris Terry OT Arrested Failure to appear Accused of failing to appear in court as scheduled on domestic violence charge from July 2002. Guilty. Team released him within hours.
2002-11-18 NO Victor Riley OT Arrested DUI Pulled over in New Orleans, accused of disobeying traffic signals and driving while intoxicated. Taken to jail at 2:25 a.m. Resolution undetermined.
2002-10-26 NO Deuce McAllister RB Arrested License Pulled over for allegedly driving 70 mph in a 40-mph zone on the way to team practice facility, accused of driving with a suspended license. Pleaded guilty on license charge, fined.
2002-10-18 CHI Bryan Robinson DE Arrested DUI Pulled over at 2:30 a.m., accused of driving with a suspended license, drunk driving and refusing a breath test, his second DUI arrest since June. Pleaded guilty, 360 hours of community service, alochol treatment, 18 months probation.
2002-10-07 CLE Darren Hambrick LB Arrested Theft Accused of felony grand theft after he cashed a $5,682 check from the Carolina Panthers, then said he never received it and cashed the reissued check. Pleaded no contest, 20 hours of community service, one year of probation.
2002-10-02 OAK Sebastian Janikowski K Arrested DUI Pulled over in Oakland, accused of drunk driving. Blood-alcohol measured at .20. Pleaded no contest to misdemeanor DUI, three years of probation, $1,292 fine, DUI school.
2002-09-25 KC Lew Bush LB Arrested DUI Pulled over and ticketed for straddling a lane, accused of drunk driving, refusing sobriety test. Guilty, driver’s license suspended.
2002-09-24 MIN Randy Moss WR Arrested Reckless driving, drugs Accused of careless driving after the officer stepped in front of his car to prevent illegal turn. Moss pushed cop with car, where marijuana was found. Pleaded guilty to misdemeanor careless driving, 40 hours of community service, 30-day jail sentence stayed.
2002-08-31 KC Willie Roaf OT Arrested DUI Pulled over, accused of drunk driving in Wyandotte County, Kan. Diversion program.
2002-08-25 OAK Darrell Russell DT Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding in Nevada, accused of drunk driving and failing a sobriety test after visiting a brothel. Pleaded guilty, ordered to attend DUI school, 48 hours of community service.
2002-07-25 CAR Chris Terry OT Arrested Domestic violence Accused of assault by his wife, who told police he pushed her up against a wall. Diversion program, counseling and community service in exchange for deferred prosecution.
2002-07-23 MIN Kenny Mixon DE Arrested DUI Pulled over in Deephaven, Min., accused of drunken driving, refusing sobriety test. Pleaded guilty, 30 days in the county workhouse or 16 days of community service within three months.
2002-07-18 MIA Derrick Rodgers LB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of attacking his wife and another man at a Miami restaurant after suspecting they were involved in an affair. Pleaded no contest, 26 domestic violence classes, 100 hours of community service, one-game suspension.
2002-07-13 BUF Charlie Rogers RB Arrested Assault Accused of punching a cop and resisting arrest in brawl at a go-go bar in New Jersey. Acquitted.
2002-07-12 PIT Marvel Smith OT Arrested Drugs Accused of marijuana possession at a hotel room in Tempe, Ariz., after police were called about the smell. Charge dropped.
2002-07-08 GB Najeh Davenport RB Arrested Burglary Accused of breaking into a woman’s dorm room at Barry University in Miami and defecating in her laundry basket. Diversion program. Charge dropped in exchange for community service.
2002-07-06 NYJ Aaron Beasley CB Charged Battery Accused of simple battery in bar fight in Jacksonville. Dropped.
2002-07-06 SF Mike Rumph CB Arrested DUI Pulled over after police said he ran stop signs in his Escalade, accused of drunk driving in Miami. Acquitted.
2002-07-02 BUF Rodney Wright WR Arrested Reckless driving Accused of hit-and-run after he crashed his SUV into a van in Fresno, Calif. Pleaded no contest to leaving the scene of an accident, three years of probation.
2002-06-26 BUF Sheldon Jackson TE Arrested Drugs, license Pulled over in Illinois, accused of possessing 2.5 grams of marijuana and driving with a suspended license . Guilty, paid fines.
2002-06-23 CHI Bryan Robinson DE Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving in Lake County, Ill. Pleaded guilty, driver’s license suspended.
2002-06-18 MIA Ricky Williams RB Cited License Pulled over in Fort Lauderdale, accused of acting incoherently and driving his Hummer with expired tags, no license or proof of insurance. Handcuffed and ticketed. Guilty on traffic tickets.
2002-06-13 CHI David Terrell WR Arrested Battery Accused of getting into an altercation with a parking valet at a Chicago nightclub. He believed his car was stolen. Charge dropped.
2002-06-12 IND Joseph Jefferson CB Arrested Gun Police spotted a gun in his car and accused of him carrying a firearm without a license. Resolution undetermined.
2002-05-24 SF Jeremy Newberry OC Arrested Assault Accused of hitting a woman several times in the face on a boat in Lake Berryessa. His sister was also accused of joining in. Charge dropped.
2002-05-18 SF Vinny Sutherland WR Arrested DUI Accused of a hit-and-run accident and drunk driving in Saratoga. Two teammates suffered minor injuries in the wreck. Pleaded no contest, sentenced to 20 days in Santa Clara County jail. It was his second DUI in 10 months.
2002-05-11 PIT Plaxico Burress WR Arrested Public intoxication Accused of being drunk in public and causing disturbances in Virginia Beach. Deferred disposition. Charged dropped if he stays clean for a year.
2002-03-27 IND Dominic Rhodes RB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of hitting and shoving his live-in girlfriend in Indiana. Diversion program, $150 fee, counseling and treatment.
2002-03-13 ARI David Boston WR Arrested DUI, drugs Accused of driving under the influence of cocaine and marijuana after testing positive for those drugs. He was arrested at his home after two people called 911. Pleaded no contest to misdemeanors, suspended sentence.
2002-02-24 MIA Ricky Williams RB Arrested Reckless driving Pulled over, arrested and accused of driving 126 mph on Interstate 10 in Louisiana. Pleaded to a reduced charge of speeding, $500 fine.
2002-02-08 CAR Jarrod Cooper S Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving, losing control of his car in a single-car accident in North Carolina. Blood-alcohol measured at .18. Pleaded no contest, one year of probation, 90-day suspended sentence, $800 fine.
2002-02-04 SD Leonardo Carson DT Arrested Assault, gun Accused of pulling a gun at a car repair shop in Mobile, Ala. Shop employee said Carson threatened him in argument over repairs. Charge dropped.
2002-02-01 OAK Darrell Russell DT Arrested Sexual assault Accused of drugging a woman and filming her rape by two associates in Alameda, Calif. Charges dropped for lack of evidence.
2002-01-20 CAR Muhsin Muhammad WR Arrested Drugs, gun Pulled over for speeding in North Carolina, accused of marijuana possession and carrying a concealed weapon. Pleaded guilty, 30-day suspended sentence, $150 fine, one year of probation.
2002-01-19 SD Jeff Graham WR Arrested Gun Accused of carrying a concealed weapon in Dayton, Ohio, after police searched his truck. He was parked and talking on the phone when police approached. Charge dropped.
2001-12-28 NO Albert Connell WR Surrendered Theft Accused of taking $3,500 from car of teammate Deuce McAllister and $863 from his locker. He claimed it was a prank. Charge dropped after he returend the money, and McAllister declined to press charges. Team released him Feb. 28
2001-12-27 NE Bobby Hamilton DE Arrested Domestic violence Accused of domestic assault in dispute with his wife, who showed no sign of injury, according to police. Charge dropped.
2001-12-24 PIT Plaxico Burress WR Cited Alcohol Cited for carrying an open container of alcohol (beer) in the Cleveland warehouse district. Pleaded no contest, $50 fine, $100 court costs.
2001-12-18 KC Eric Warfield CB Arrested DUI Pulled over after police saw him weaving in traffic, accused of drunk driving in Lenexa, Kan. Diversion program, later revoked when he was arrested again in 2003.
2001-12-09 CIN Neil Rackers K Charged Assault Accused of choking man at a sports bar in Covington, Ky., after the man allegedly insulted Rackers’ wife and mother. Diversion program. Charge dropped in exchange for confidential settlement with victim.
2001-12-07 CLE O.J. Santiago TE Summoned Drugs Police searched teammate Gerard Warren’s car and found marijuana, which they said belonged to Santiago. Guilty of disorderly conduct, $366 fine.
2001-11-20 PHI Damon Moore S Charged Animal abuse Accused of abandoning Rottweiler puppy in a New Jersey field three days after buying it. He found the dog to be too much trouble. Pleaded guilty, 15 hours of community service and animal center, $2,000 fine.
2001-11-20 CLE Gerard Warren DT Arrested Gun Accused of carrying an unlicensed gun after police spotted a holster in his Suburban parked outside a nightclub party for Plaxico Burress. Pleaded guilty to misdemeanor gun charge, one year of probation.
2001-11-19 CLE Lamar Chapman CB Arrested Drugs Pulled over as passenger in Mike Sellers’ car, accused of marijuana and cocaine possession. Pleaded guilty to possession of drug paraphernalia.
2001-11-19 CLE Mike Sellers FB Arrested DUI, drugs Pulled over in Cleveland with teammate Lamar Champan, accused of speeding, drunk driving and marijuana and cocaine possesssion. Pleaded guilty to drunk driving. Team cut him a week after arrest.
2001-11-16 PHI Terrence Carroll S Arrested Drugs Police caught him smoking marijuana in the back of a car, accused of misdemeanor drug possession. Diversion program, one month of probation, 10 hours of community service, substance-abuse class.
2001-11-11 JAX Jimmy Smith WR Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeing in Jacksonville, accused of drunk driving. Tests later showed cocained in his system. Blood-alcohol measured below limit at .05. Charge dropped.
2001-10-26 BUF Travis Henry RB Charged Sex Accused of attempting to have sex with a 15-year-old girl, who claimed she was almost 18. Pleaded guilty to misdemeanor sexual misconduct, 100 hours of community service.
2001-10-14 NYJ Damien Robinson NYJ Arrested Gun Pulled over outside Giants stadium, where bomb-sniffing dog helped lead police to an assault rifle in his trunk. He had permit for the gun in New York. Charge dropped. Team fined him $30,000.
2001-09-14 SF Vinny Sutherland WR Arrested DUI Pulled over on Highway 101 in Bay Area , accused of drunk driving. Pleaded guilty to reduced charge of reckless driving, rehab, two years of probation.
2001-09-04 BAL Cornell Brown LB Arrested Drugs Complaints from neighbors led police to find marijuana and drug paraphernalia at his home. Charge dropped. Team cut him the next day but later re-signed him.
2001-09-02 DEN Eddie Kennison WR Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of inciting a riot at Louisiana nightclub after dispute with bouncer who denied him entry to club because he wasn’t properly dressed. Charges dropped.
2001-08-31 CIN Vaughn Booker DE Arrested Domestic violence Accused of pushing wife in argument at the couple’s home near Cincinnati. Charge dropped.
2001-08-26 CIN Tom Barndt DT Arrested DUI Pulled over in Covington, Ky., accused of drunk driving. Resolution undetermined. Team released him the next week.
2001-08-12 CLE Corey Fuller CB Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of impeding traffic at crowded intersection, refusing to move car when asked to by police in Cleveland. Pleaded no contest to disorderly conduct, fined $75.
2001-07-21 JAX
  1. Jay Soward
WR Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of being intoxicated at theme park in Orlando, swearing at security guards. Pleaded no contest, $361 in fines and costs.
2001-07-17 JAX Stacey Mack RB Arrested Solicitation Accused of offering $15 to undercover police officer for oral sex. Pleaded no contest, $300 fine.
2001-07-14 CHI Paul Edinger K Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving and crashing into mailboxes in Punta Gorda, Fla. Pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of reckless driving.
2001-07-13 DET Aaron Gibson OT Charged Assault Accused of hitting a woman in the buttocks and spitting in her face outside a club in Pontiac, Mich. Pleaded guilty.
2001-07-05 NO Michael Hawthorne CB Arrested Drugs, reckless driving Pulled over for weaving in New Orleans, accused of reckless driving and marijuana possession after police smelled dope. Resolution undetermined.
2001-07-04 MIA Ben Kelly CB Arrested DUI Accused of bumping into a parked police car, drunk driving and refusing breath test in Miami. Acquitted by jury.
2001-06-23 ARI Michael Pittman RB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of breaking sliding glass door and criminal trespass in dispute with his wife in Tempe, Ariz. It was the second domestic incident for him in two weeks. Pleaded guilty, three years of probation, five days in jail, suspended one game.
2001-06-16 TB Alex Ardley CB Charged DUI Accused of drunk driving and crashing Deuce McAllister’s SUV into a house in Tallahassee, Fla. Pleaded guilty to a reduced charge, 150 hours of community service, released by team the next day.
2001-06-15 BAL Chris McAlister CB Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of disturbing the peace, verbal abuse and pushing a flight attendant in dispute over seating arrangments at Las Vegas airport. Resolution undetermined.
2001-06-10 ARI Michael Pittman RB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of getting into a heated argument with his wife, who locked herself in a car to get away from him. Diversion program, anger management.
2001-05-23 KC Victor Riley OT Arrested Domestic violence Accused of ramming his vehicle into another vehicle occupied by his wife and baby daughter, leaving the scene of an accident in Overland Park, Kan. Diversion program, suspended one game.
2001-05-16 NE Terry Glenn WR Arrested Domestic violence Accused of assaulting the mother of his child in Walpole, Mass. Charge dropped after the mother recanted.
2001-05-14 NYG Jeremiah Parker DE Charged Manslaughter, child abuse Accused of child abuse in the case of the 4-year-old son of his girlfriend. The boy went unconscious and died after being shaken. The mother also was accused. Convicted of endangering a child, acquitted of manslaughter, sentenced to 10 years in prison.
2001-05-04 BAL Leon Searcy OT Arrested Domestic violence Accused of kicking his wife in the leg during an argument. Diversion program, anger management.
2001-05-01 CLE Jeremiah Pharms LB Arrested Theft, gun Accused of stealing $1,500 worth of marijuana and shooting a drug dealer in Seattle in 2000. He was charged with the crime two weeks after getting drafted. Pleaded no contest, 41 months in prison.
2001-04-04 PHI Thomas Hamner RB Charged Animal abuse Accused of beating his pit pull in New Jersey, the second time since November 2000. Pleaded guilty, put the dog up for adoption, fined $1,000.
2001-03-07 NE Adrian Klemm OT Charged Assault Accused of property destruction and punching the windshield of another motorist in a road-rage incident. He didn’t like how the other motorist was driving. Convicted, ordered to pay $455 in restitution, 50 hours of community service, one-year probation.
2001-03-03 MIA Jermaine Haley DT Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving in Miami Beach, bottle of vodka found in his SUV. Blood-alcohol measured at .22. Pleaded no contest, 50 hours of community service, $500 fine, six months of probation.
2001-03-02 DEN Dwayne Carswell TE Arrested Domestic violence Accused of pulling a woman’s hair and bruising her arm’s in altercation in Pueblo, Colo. Diversion program, community service.
2001-02-14 SD Leonardo Carson DT Charged Assault Accused of third-degree assault and criminal mischief in Alabama. Charge dropped.
2001-02-08 CIN Akili Smith QB Arrested DUI Pulled over for driving the wrong way down a one-way street in San Diego, accused of drunk driving. Acquitted.
2001-01-09 CIN Tremain Mack S Jailed Probation violation Sentenced to a month in jail for probation violation stemming from previous drunk-driving conviction. A TV station filmed him driving, which violated probation. Guilty, one month in jail.
2000-11-20 MIN John Davis TE Arrested DUI Police said they found his vehicle stopped in the road with him sleeping behind wheel, accused of drunk driving in Wayzata, Minn. Pleaded guilty to careless driving, fined $700, but $500 of it stayed along with 40-day jail sentence.
2000-11-12 PHI Thomas Hamner RB Charged Animal abuse Investigated for animal cruelty involving his pit bull in New Jersey. Pleaded guilty, $300 fine.
2000-10-28 DEN Brian Griese QB Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding near Denver, accused of drunk driving, failing sobriety tests. Pleaded guilty, one year of probation.
2000-09-21 DAL Joey Galloway WR Charged Asssault Accused of assaulting a police officer at a hotel party in Wheeling, W. Va., in May 2000. Charge dropped.
2000-09-20 WAS Dana Stubblefield DT Arrested Domestic violence Accused of assaulting his wife at their homoe in Virginia during an argument about luggage. Police said there were no signs of physical injury. Charge dropped.
2000-09-12 TB Damien Robinson S Arrested Theft Police pulled him over for a traffic violation and found warrant for his arrest on charge of writing a bad $80 check to the tax collector. Guilty, paid back funds.
2000-09-07 JAX Stacey Mack RB Charged Theft Accused of writing a worthless check for property less than $150, according to county records. Offense date was April 18, 2000. Pleaded no contest, $100 fine.
2000-08-26 CIN Corey Dillon RB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of striking his wife in Washington, fourth-degree assault. Diversion program, $750 donation to women’s shelter, treatment.
2000-08-24 KC Andre Rison WR Charged Theft Accused of writing a bad check for $78,800 to a jewelry store while he was playing for the Chiefs. Pleaded guilty, two years of probation, paid back in full.
2000-08-13 NO Darren Perry S Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving, hit-and-run and rear-ending another car near New Orleans. Police pursued him after seeing him swerving in traffic. Resolution undetermined.
2000-08-09 DEN Bill Romanowski LB Indicted Drugs Accused of illegaly obtaining prescription diet pills to boost his performance on the field. Acquitted by jury.
2000-08-07 KC Andre Rison WR Cited False information Accused of lying to police about his name after a bar fight in River Falls, Wis. He told the police his name was Brock Middlebrook. Guilty, fined $219.50. Team cut him a few days later.
2000-07-28 TB Darnell McDonald WR Arrested Burglary, battery Accused of aggravated battery with great bodily harm and burglary stemming from incident on July 14 in Tampa. Pleaded out, two years probation, 150 hours of community service, anger management program, released by team.
2000-07-20 CIN Darnay Scott WR Arrested Theft Accused of writing a back check for more than $5,100 to a motorcycle shop in Florence, Ky. Charge dropped, but he spent a night in jail and had to pay back the money.
2000-07-18 MIA Patrick Surtain CB Arrested DUI Pulled over in Miami for speeding, accused of drunk driving, refusing breath test. Pleaded no contest to reckless driving, 50 hours of community service, $25,000 donation to MADD.
2000-07-07 SD Leonardo Carson DT Charged Assault Accused of third-degree assault, one of string of incidents for him in his hometown of Mobile, Ala. Charge dropped.
2000-06-21 OAK Sebastian Janikowski K Arrested Drugs Accused of possession of a controlled substance, the designer drug GHB, after police approached his car and found suspicious substance. Acquitted by jury.
2000-06-11 CHI Bryan Robinson DE Charged Battery Accused of spitting on a woman’s face at a bar in Chicago. Resolution undetermined.
2000-05-24 OAK Charles Woodson CB Arrested DUI Accused of drunk driving and driving with a suspended license in Ann Arbor, Mich. Blood-alcohol measured at .24. Pleaded guilty to driving while impaired, 60 hours of community service.
2000-05-20 BAL Chris McAlister CB Charged Drugs Accused of marijuana possession after authorities found small amounts in his house while investigating a burglary. Charge dropped for lack of evidence.
2000-05-19 GB Marco Rivera OG Arrested DUI Pulled over for speeding at 95 mph in Brown County, accused of drunk driving. Blood-alcohol measured at .19. Pleaded no contest, $455 speeding ticket, $675 DUI fine.
2000-05-13 WAS Mike Sellers FB Arrested DUI Pulled over in Arlington, Va., after police said his Mercedes was weaving, accused of drunk driving. Convicted of DUI, 18-month suspended jail sentence, one-year license suspension.
2000-04-17 DAL Tony Hutson OT Arrested Failure to appear, gun Pulled over for speeding in Texas, accused of failing to appear in court for previous incident. Police also found a pistol in his car. Resolution undetermined.
2000-04-10 GB Mark Chmura TE Arrested Sexual assault Accused of encouraging teenagers to drink, sexually assaulting 17-year-old girl in the bathroom at a prom party in Wisconsin. Acquitted by jury.
2000-04-06 CIN Steve Foley LB Arrested Gun Accused of firing gun into the air several times outside nightclub in Monroe, La. Pulled over and arrested, Foley yelled he was being illegal searched. Charge dropped for lack of evidence.
2000-04-01 GB De’Mond Parker RB Arrested Drugs Accused of marijuana possession near Chicago after police investigated loud music coming from his parked car. Diversion program. Charge dropped in exchange for drug program.
2000-03-31 MIN Chris Walsh WR Arrested DUI Pulled over near his home in Scottsdale, Ariz., accused of drunk driving. Blood-alcohol measured at .229. Pleaded guilty to drunk driving, $1,277 fine, 12 days in jail, alcohol treatment.
2000-03-23 DAL Solomon Page OT Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of throwing punches and obstructing police in brawl in Morgantown, W.Va. Handcuffed and pepper-sprayed about 3 a.m. Pleaded no contest to reduced charged, $200 fine.
2000-03-14 ARI Mario Bates RB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of slapping his girlfriend in the face in Scottsdale, Ariz. Pleaded guilty, $364 fine, two years of probation.
2000-02-22 KC Tamarick Vanover WR Charged Theft Accused of assisting in the sale of a stolen vehicle, arranging to have it moved from Kansas City to Florida in exchange for $10,000. Pleaded guilty, $10,000 fine, $6,241 to the insurance company, two months each in jail and home detention.
2000-02-21 NO Ricky Williams RB Arrested Failure to appear Pulled over in Austin, Texas, accused of improperly signaling lane change, failure to appear in court for previous traffic incidents. Guilty, pleaded $429 in fines.
2000-02-19 TEN Benji Olson OG Arrested DUI Pulled over at a shopping center in Hopkinsville, Ky., accused of drunk driving. Blood-alcohol measured at .97. Pleaded to a reduced charge of failing to operate vehicle carefully. Fined $100, plus costs.
2000-02-16 KC Andre Rison WR Arrested Theft Accused of renting but not returning a $1,100 audio recorder from Guitar World in Overland Park, Kan. Pleaded no contest, sentenced to one year of probation.
2000-02-06 IND Keith Elias RB Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of resisting arrest and disorderly conduct in incident outside Bamboo Bar in New Jersey, along with Wayne Chrebet of the Jets. Pleaded guilty to nuisance violation, fined $230.
2000-02-06 NYJ Wayne Chrebet WR Arrested Disorderly conduct Accused of disorderly conduct in altercation outside the Bamboo Bar in New Jersey. Pleaded guilty to nuisance violation, fined $230.
2000-02-05 CIN Steve Foley LB Arrested Domestic violence Accused of kicking in the door of his son’s mother and grabbing her by the throat. Charge dropped after woman declined to cooperate.
2000-02-03 CAR Fred Lane RB Arrested Drugs, gun Police pulled him over in Jackson, Tenn., for moving slowly and said they found an assault rifle in the trunk of his Mercedes and marijuana on the men n the car. Indicted but shot and killed by his wife in July 2000.
2000-01-31 BAL Ray Lewis LB Charged Murder Accused of murder in the stabbing deaths of two men outside a nightclub in Atlanta on the night of the Super Bowl. Pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice, one year of probation, fined $250,000 by NFL. Crime unsolved.
2000-01-24 DEN Rod Smith WR Arrested Domestic violence Accused of choking, beating and shoving his common-law wife at home near Denver. Pleaded guilty to misdemeanor count of verbal abuse, two years probation, counseling.
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Try this! “PRONUNCIATION OF “S” Vocabulary of the Day

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Pronunciation of S
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Pronunciation of S